Finalists for 4TH HR PINDUTEROS CHOICE for HR WEBSITES

NOMINADO SA 4TH HR PINDUTEROS CHOICE PARA SA HR WEBSITES
This recognition goes to Human Rights websites that generated the most number of clicks from pinduteros in the HRonlinePH.com’s “HR websites tub” where the list of HR websites can be found.

Ang mga nominado sa 4TH HR PINDUTEROS CHOICE PARA SA HR WEBSITES

 

ATM

ALYANSA TIGIL MINA (ATM)
alyansatigilmina.net

The Alyansa Tigil Mina (ATM) is a coalition of organizations and groups who have decided to collectively challenge the aggressive promotion of large-scale mining in the Philippines. Composed of Non-Government Organizations, People’s Organizations, Church groups and academic institutions, the ATM is both an advocacy group and a people’s movement, working in solidarity to protect Filipino communities and natural resources that are threatened by large-scale mining operations.
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CLRD

CHILDREN’S LEGAL RIGHTS AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER, INC.
clrdc.wordpress.com

Children’s Legal Rights and Development Center, Inc. is a non-stock, non-profit legal resource human rights organization for children committed to advancing children’s rights and welfare through the provision of its services based on human rights developmental framework approach and methodologies.
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PHILRIGHTS

PHILIPPINE HUMAN RIGHTS INFORMATION CENTER (PHILRIGHTS)
philrights.org

The Philippine Human Rights Information Center (PhilRights) is a non-stock, non-profit organization duly registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) since October 10, 1994. It is an associated NGO of the United Nations Department of Public Information (UN DPI) and has a special consultative status with the UN Economic and Social Council (UN ECOSOC).

The Philippine Human Rights Information Center (PhilRights) has been part of the human rights movement and has been doing advocacy work through its research and information activities since its formation. Established through a resolution passed during the 7th National Congress of the Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA) and formally constituted in July 1991, PhilRights serves as the research and information center of the alliance.
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PAHRA

PHILIPPINE ALLIANCE OF HUMAN RIGHTS ADVOCATES (PAHRA)
philippinehumanrights.org

The Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA) is a non-stock, non-profit alliance duly registered under the laws of the Philippines, with SEC No. ANO92-03505. It was established on August 9, 1986 in a Congress that was participated in by more than a hundred organizations from all over the Philippines. It was formed as an alliance of individuals, institutions and organizations committed to the promotion, protection and realization of human rights in the Philippines.
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CTUHR

CENTER FOR TRADE AND HUMAN RIGHTS (CTUHR)
ctuhr.org

In the spirit of solidarity to fight state repression and to restore workers’ inherent right to life and dignity, the Center for Trade and Human Rights (CTUHR) was conceived by a group of religious people, labour rights advocates and trade unionists in 1984.

CTUHR’s purpose is to confront state and capitalist’s human rights violations not with an equally evil force but with an awareness that strength and emancipation lies in the hands of the workers’ themselves and in solidarity with the poor and the oppressed.

CTUHR is committed to the cause of advancing genuine, democratic, nationalist and militant trade unionism. It is against all forms of deception and coercion that seeks to derail this cause. The Center believes that repression can and has taken on different and subtle forms like labour legislations, and flexible employment schemes, amongst others and therefore devotes herself to exposing these devious moves.
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SALIGAN

SENTRO NG ALTERNATIBONG LINGAP PANLIGAL (SALIGAN)
saligan.org

SALIGAN is a legal resource non-governmental organization doing developmental legal work with women, farmers, workers, the urban poor, the indigenous peoples and local communities. SALIGAN seeks to effect societal change by working towards the empowerment of women, the basic sectors, and local communities through the creative use of the law and legal resources.

SALIGAN’s partnerships with the marginalized sectors and local communities are vast and deep. It has more than one hundred (100) partner-organizations all over the country, from Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao. Founded in 1987, SALIGAN is one of the oldest member of the Alternative Law Groups, Inc. (ALG), a coalition of law groups in the Philippines engaged in the practice of alternative or developmental law.

SALIGAN operates in different areas throughout the Philippines. It has two branches – one branch operates in the Bicol Region (Naga City), one of the biggest and poorest regions in the country, and the other branch operates in Mindanao (Davao City).
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AIPH

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL PILIPINAS (AI-Ph)
amnesty.org.ph

Amnesty International is a global movement of more than 3 million supporters, members and activists in over 150 countries and territories who campaign to end grave abuses of human rights.

Our vision is for every person to enjoy all the rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international human rights standards.
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TFDP

TASK FORCE DETAINEES OF THE PHILIPPINES (TFDP)
tfdp.net

It was in 1974 that the Association of Major Religious Superiors of the Philippines (AMRSP) established the Task Force Detainees of the Philippines (TFDP) to assist political prisoners, at a time when most organizations were banned. The AMRSP reflected on a survey which showed the presence of political prisoners in all regions of the country. The political detainees, most of whom where subjected to torture, had families who were placed under surveillance anf from whom money was extorted purportedly to facilitate better treatment and/or their release from detention.

TFDP then provided moral and spiritual support to the political prisoners, assisted them in their material needs, documented their situation as well as worked for theirm just trial and speedy release. Prisoners, on various occasions, conducted hunger strikes to push for better jail conditions and immediate actions for their release. TFDP was almost always there to help. Relatives were eager to have sisters or nuns with them when visiting the detainees in the jails, since it seemed that some respect to the habit still prevailed in the military ranks.
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AMRSP

ASSOCIATION OF MAJOR RELIGIOUS SUPERIORS IN THE PHILIPPINES (AMRSP)
amrsp.org

We, the Major Religious Superiors of the Philippines, chosen by the Creator-God to be witnesses and sharers of Christ’s mission, though distinct in our charisms because of the individual heritage of our religious congregations, yet one in our calling to proclaim the Good News in the context of the local Church in the Philippines, inspired by the Holy Spirit, have bound ourselves as servant-leaders of our congregations to this common VISION: The transformation of the Filipino nation into a people, who enjoy the fullness of life, thereby reflecting the coming of the Reign of God.
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FDC

FREEDOM FROM DEBT COALITION (FDC)
fdc.ph

The Freedom from Debt Coalition (FDC) – Philippines is a nationwide multi-sectoral, non-sectarian and pluralist coalition conducting policy advocacy work and campaigns to realize a common framework and agenda for economic development.

Formally launched in March 1988 by 90 organizations, FDC has grown over the years to more than 250 organizations and individual members in the National Capital Region and Luzon, and in seven (7) chapters in Visayas and Mindanao.

The Coalition addresses the economy and economic development. However, we depart from the traditional definition and scope of the economy and economic development.

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