Category Archives: Off the shelf

[Off-the-shelf] Activists and Journalists Targeted as Draconian Anti-Terror Law Challenged in the Philippines -CIVICUS Monitor

#HumanRights #TerrorLaw

Activists and Journalists Targeted as Draconian Anti-Terror Law Challenged in the Philippines

Screen grabbed from CIVICUS Monitor website

Philippines’ civic space rating was downgraded by the CIVICUS Monitor in early December 2020 from ‘obstructed’ to ‘repressed’. The rating change was driven by attacks on human rights defenders and journalists, the vilification and criminalisation of activists, the assault on press freedom, and the passage of new draconian anti-terror law.

On 15th December 2020, the office of the International Criminal Court’s (ICC) prosecutor said there was a “reasonable basis” to believe that crimes against humanity were committed during Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs.

In January 2021, Investigate PH, a group of individuals and civil society groups, formally launched an independent international probe into the human rights situation in the Philippines. Organised by US-based International Coalition for Human Rights in the Philippines (ICHRP), the group is composed of representatives from various lawyers’ and faith-based groups, as well as trade unions in the United States, Canada and Australia. It said it would release three reports to be submitted to the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC). The first two reports will be released for upcoming UNHRC sessions in March and July 2021. The group will also submit findings to the International Criminal Court (ICC).

In recent months, human rights defenders, trade unions and journalists have been arrested on fabricated charges or killed. The Department of National Defence terminated a decades-old agreement that prohibits state forces from entering University of the Philippines’ campuses without prior notice to school officials while security forces raided an indigenous Lumad school in Cebu City. Civil society groups are challenging the draconian anti-terror law in the Supreme Court.

Read full report @https://monitor.civicus.org

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[Off-the-shelf] “A Well-Being Workbook for Youth Activists” Volume 2 -AIph

#HumanRights #MentalHealth

Happiness and your activism can co-exist.

You deserve to be as nice to yourself as you are to other people.
Amnesty’s “A Well-Being Workbook for Youth Activists” Volume 2 to support you on your journey to care for yourself and others while defending human rights.

Follow @amnesty
Read Volume 1 of the FanZine here: http://bit.ly/AmnestyFanZineVol1

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[Off-the-shelf] 𝗔 𝗥𝗲𝗽𝗼𝗿𝘁 𝗼𝗻 𝗦𝗼𝘂𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗔𝘀𝗶𝗮𝗻 𝗖𝗼𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗥𝗲𝘀𝗽𝗼𝗻𝘀𝗲𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝗖𝗢𝗩𝗜𝗗-𝟭𝟵 𝗧𝗶𝗺𝗲𝘀 -UPCIDS

#HumanRights #COVID19ph

CASES OF ALTERNATIVES | 𝗔 𝗥𝗲𝗽𝗼𝗿𝘁 𝗼𝗻 𝗦𝗼𝘂𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗔𝘀𝗶𝗮𝗻 𝗖𝗼𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗥𝗲𝘀𝗽𝗼𝗻𝘀𝗲𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝗖𝗢𝗩𝗜𝗗-𝟭𝟵 𝗧𝗶𝗺𝗲𝘀

This year, marginalized and grassroots communities across Southeast Asia faced the unique, uneven, and long-lasting impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in their localities. Despite all, we persisted, trusting in practices, frameworks, and movements as alternatives to an anti-people system.

This report documents these responses from the ground. It bears witness to the power of the people to define development in their own terms.

As we approach the end of 2020 and the start of a new decade, let these cases of community responses by marginalized sectors, communities, and grassroots of Southeast Asian societies remind us of the possibilities of social solidarity and collective action.

Salute to the communities and organizations for braving the crisis of the decade. May their examples be lessons for all communities fighting the pandemic through alternatives.

📖 Read and download the report for free at bit.ly/cidsaltdevrlssea

***

Sponsored by the Rosa-Luxemburg-Stiftung with funds of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development of the Federal Republic of Germany.

This publication or parts of it can be used by others for free as long as they provide a proper reference to the original publication.

The content of the publication is the sole responsibility of UP CIDS AltDev and does not necessarily reflect a position of RLS.

#covid19SEAcommunityresponses
#Lawan
#peopleleddevelopment
#alternativeregionalism

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[Off-the-shelf] Primer: 20 questions on the Anti-Terrorism Act of 2020 -PCIJ

Primer: 20 questions on the Anti-Terrorism Act of 2020

What are the pertinent provisions of the Anti-Terrorism Act of 2020? FLAG and PCIJ put together a primer on the widely denounced new law that prompted 37 Supreme Court petitions to declare it unconstitutional.
BY PHILIPPINE CENTER FOR INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM (PCIJ) AND FREE LEGAL ASSISTANCE GROUP (FLAG)

President Rodrigo Duterte signed on July 3, 2020 Republic Act No. 11479 or the Anti-Terrorism Act of 2020 (ATA). It repealed the Human Security Act (HSA) of 2007 and expanded the powers of the executive department and law enforcement officers in addressing the country’s growing security challenges.

ATA was widely denounced in different parts of the country, however. Thirty-seven petitions have been filed with the Supreme to declare several provisions unconstitutional.

The petitioners raised concerns about the definition of the crime of terrorism, which they said was vague and dangerous. The law also extended the number of days a suspect may be detained without warrant and the number of days that law enforcement agents may conduct surveillance and wiretapping.

The Free Legal Assistance Group (FLAG) and the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ) put together a primer on the ATA to summarize the pertinent provisions of the law.

The Supreme Court was originally scheduled to hold oral arguments on the constitutionality of ATA on Jan. 19. It was reset to Feb. 2 after the staff of Solicitor General Jose Calida tested positive for the novel coronavirus disease.

Read full article @pcij.org

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[Off-the-shelf] YEAR-END REPORT: 𝐒𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐀𝐬𝐢𝐚𝐧 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐂𝐎𝐕𝐈𝐃-𝟏𝟗 𝐓𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬 -UP CIDS

#HumanRights #COVID19ph

YEAR-END REPORT: 𝐒𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐀𝐬𝐢𝐚𝐧 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐂𝐎𝐕𝐈𝐃-𝟏𝟗 𝐓𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬

The Program on Alternative Development of the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) shares its comprehensive account on grassroots experiences during the pandemic entitled: “A Report on Southeast Asian Community Responses in COVID-19 Times”.

This year, marginalized and grassroots communities across Southeast Asia faced the unique, uneven, and long-lasting impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in their localities. Despite all, they persisted, trusting in practices, frameworks, and movements as alternatives to an anti-people system.

The report documents these responses from the ground. It bears witness to the power of the people to define development in their own terms and actualize possibilities for social solidarity and collective action. May their examples be lessons for all communities fighting the pandemic through alternatives.

Read and download the report for free: https://bit.ly/cidsaltdevrlssea

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All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc.

[Off-the-shelf] Tuligsa at iba pang mga Tula ni Rene Boy E. Abiva

#HumanRights #FreedomOfExpression

Tuligsa at iba pang mga Tula ni Rene Boy E. Abiva

Image from Popular Bookstore FB page

Pagmasdan mo aking Bayan ang aking
naging kapalaran nang ika’y aming pilit
ibangon sa bangis ng mabangis at malalim
na bangin.

Ang hininga’y samyo ng nabubulok na
waling-waling habang mahigpit sa
pagkakasiping ang paghihirap at
kalungkutan,dagdag pa ang animo’y latigo
sa bagsik na gubat ng kalawanging bakal
na krus at alambreng koronang tinik…

“Sa kulungan nahubog ang kanyang malikhaing pagtatala sa kanyang naging buhay. Mahusay niyang nagamit ang sining ng talinhaga at paggagap sa mga imahe’t simbolismo ng pakikibaka.Nabigo niya ang estado’t di maikakaila na malaking ambag ang kanyang akda sa pagpapatuloy na pag-usbong at pag-unlad ng panitikang progresibo at rebolusyunaryong marapat mabasa ng mamamayang Pilipino.”

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[Off-the-shelf] KILUSAN – Opisyal na Pahayagan ng Kilusan para sa Pambansang Demokrasya

KILUSAN – Opisyal na Pahayagan ng Kilusan para sa Pambansang Demokrasya (Kilusan)

Click the link below to read more:

https://bit.ly/3nQrqIq

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[Off-the-shelf] Human Rights in Southeast Asia in Times of Pandemic -Forum-Asia

Human Rights in Southeast Asia in Times of Pandemic

ASEAN Member States have responded to COVID-19 with a wide number of measures, including the introduction of new laws, policies and practices. The authorities in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and the Philippines passed or invoked state emergency laws which gave governments sweeping powers. Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia, while not declaring a state of emergency, utilised existing laws and/or introduced specific, non-emergency legislation. Countries such as Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand have utilised contact tracing apps that act as surveillance over people’s movement. Most countries deployed military and police forces to implement movement restrictions and combat what they described as online falsehood or fake news under the pretext of safeguarding national security and countering COVID-19.

At the ASEAN regional level, the first official response to the COVID-19 Pandemic was on 15 February 2020, with the Chairman’s Statement titled ASEAN’s Collective Response to the Outbreak of the 2019 Coronavirus, on behalf of ASEAN’s heads of states and governments. The statement highlights the need to strengthen coordination of national and regional efforts in ensuring ASEAN’s readiness and responsive measures to mitigate and subsequently eliminate the threat of COVID-19. In addition, the statement provides that the people should be “rightly and thoroughly informed on the COVID-19 situation.”

Since then, several commitments were undertaken at the regional level, among them the adoption of the Hanoi Plan of Action on Strengthening ASEAN Economic Cooperation and Supply Chain Connectivity in Response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the statement made by the ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) issued in early May to highlight the need to integrate “human rights values” within the response to the pandemic. However, questions have been posed by civil society organisations and the public on whether these commitments have been implemented in practice and in particular whether ASEAN is able to address the human rights situation on the ground.

Participants in the webinars and subsequent research have pointed to several trends in the ASEAN Member States policy on COVID-19. These include resort to a security-approaches as well as wide-scale use of surveillance, which have brought detrimental impact on civic space violations of human rights, including the right to liberty, freedom of expression and peaceful assembly and association.

Based on observations from webinar participants and FORUM-ASIA’s research, it is evidential that the ASEAN governments’ response to COVID-19 has accelerated the rise of authoritarianism and increased the use of military in further repressing democracy, human rights and civic space. Discriminatory treatment and at times violence towards has marginalised groups, including women, the homeless, people living in poverty, indigenous groups, and LGBTIQ further exacerbate public health risks of members of these groups.

Read more @www.forum-asia.org

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[Off-the-shelf] Report on the Situation of Human Rights Defenders in the Philippines -CHR

Report on the Situation of Human Rights Defenders in the Philippines

JULY, 2020

“Human rights defender (HRD) is a term used to describe people who, individually or with others, act to promote or protect human rights.”1 HRDs include all those who “seek the promotion and protection of civil and political rights as well as the promotion, protection and realization of economic, social and cultural rights.”

The Declaration on Human Rights Defenders,3 in characterizing HRDs, refer to all “individuals, groups and associations… contributing to… the effective elimination of all violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms of peoples and individuals.”

Proposed domestic legislation defines HRDs in a similar manner, further expanding it to state that the “main or substantial work and advocacy [of HRDs] is to promote the respect for, foster knowledge of, and protect any forms of human rights and freedoms”5 at the “local, national, regional, and international levels.”

There are thus no specific guidelines that identify who HRDs are, rather, they are defined by the work that they do. HRDs engage in duties, whether for profit or pro bono, that aim to, among others, investigate and report on violations of human rights; provide support to ensure the fulfillment of international treaty obligations; lobby for legislative or judicial reforms; mobilize and shape public opinion on human rights; or secure accountability for human rights violations. HRDs include members of civic organizations, journalists, lawyers, representatives of marginalized sectors, members of the academe, government officials, and all others who engage in activities for the fulfillment of basic human rights.

Due to the nature of their work, HRDs worldwide are frequent victims of human rights violations themselves. Many are subjected to extrajudicial killings, enforced disappearances, arbitrary detention, threats, harassment, and restrictions on their freedoms of expression, association and assembly.7 In the Philippines, there are similar allegations that HRDs are targeted and subjected to abuses, particularly by government agents.

This Inquiry was launched by the Commission on Human Rights (Commission) to ascertain the current situation impacting the work, safety, and security of HRDs in the country. The decision to launch this Inquiry was prompted by letters received from individuals and organizations containing allegations of human rights violations attributed to State officials.8 The Commission also took cognizance of reports coming out in various media concerning attacks against the civil, political, economic, social, and cultural rights of certain groups and individuals and those who defend them. These allegations were similarly echoed in complaints received by the Commission’s regional offices.

Click the link for the complete report “CHRP-2020-Report-on-the-Situation-of-Human-Rights-Defenders

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[Off-the-shelf] Philippines: New report reveals deliberate killings of children during “war on drugs”- by OMCT and CLRDC, Philippines

Philippines: New report reveals deliberate killings of children during “war on drugs”

Geneva (OMCT) – A new report, published today, documents 122 killings of children, from 1 to 17 years old, throughout the Philippines, between July 2016 and December 2019. The report, titled “How could they do this to my child?”, jointly published by the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT) and the Children’s Legal Rights and Development Center (CLRDC, Philippines), shows that the majority of the killings were carried out by police forces or affiliates.

The report is based on information directly collected from the locations where the children were killed, including interviews with local authorities, families and witnesses, and the examination of official documents related to each case. It identifies clear patterns for the killings, including the direct targeting of victims; killings of children as proxies when the real targets could not be found; as a result of mistaken identities; and as so-called “collateral damage”. The report details six cases, with the youngest victim a 20-month old girl.

In one particularly horrific case, a 7-year old boy was killed in cold blood because he had witnessed the murder of an adult by a member of the local authorities. The killings continue, with at least seven children killed from January to March 2020.

“These revelations must be a wake-up call for the international community, who has been largely absent as the Philippine government has kept trampling human rights”, said Gerald Staberock, OMCT Secretary-General. “Over the past four years, we have hardly seen any meaningful reaction to the wanton killing of thousands of people under the pretext of the “war on drugs”, the targeting of the poorest and most marginalized citizens of the Philippines, and the persecution of human rights defenders, many of whom are in prison for their legitimate work. It is the total lack of accountability that feeds the cycle of violence, including the war on children we are witnessing.”

It is estimated that the total number of extrajudicial killings in the framework of the Philippine government’s anti-drug campaign may run as high as 27,000. Only in one case did the policemen involved get convicted.

This impunity, and the fact that most victims are poor and vulnerable, further increase a climate of terror created by the “war on drugs”. Practically all the families and witnesses interviewed for this report have asked to remain anonymous. Many of them did not file a case for the murder of their child, fearing retaliation. With parents often too afraid to testify, even anonymously, it is likely that the actual numbers of children killed are higher than the 122 documented in the report.

As the United Nations Human Rights Council is about to examine the record of the Philippines, the report sets out detailed recommendations, including for the creation of an independent commission of inquiry into human rights violations in the Philippines, with a special focus on children.

Full access to the report.

The World Organization Against Torture (OMCT) is the main global coalition of NGOs fighting torture and ill-treatment, with 200 members in more than 90 countries. Its international secretariat is based in Geneva, Switzerland.

The Children’s Legal Rights and Development Center (CLRDC) is the leading child rights organisation in the Philippines.

Media Contact: Iolanda Jaquemet, ij@omct.org, mobile +41 79 539 41 06

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[Off-the-shelf] Booklet: Psychosocial Well-being for Human Rights Defenders in the Philippines -Forum Asia

Booklet: Psychosocial Well-being for Human Rights Defenders in the Philippines

The well-being of human rights defenders is a critical – but still often neglected – issue. Human rights defenders (HRDs) are particularly exposed to a number of different stressors. Unlike others, HRDs will generally have a higher exposure to stress and trauma, either directly or indirectly.

‘Psychosocial Well-being for Human Rights Defenders in the Philippines’ aims to provide HRDs with the basic knowledge to address their well-being individually, organisationally and as a movement.

The booklet also aims to serve as an advocacy tool to demonstrate the importance of well-being to decision makers – whether it be the heads of their organisations or donors – and call for well-being to be prioritised.

Safeguarding the psychosocial well-being of HRDs is critical for their health, and is essential for ensuring they are able to continue their work in the long term and build their resilience against the threats they face.

This booklet is an output document from the Psychosocial Well-being Workshop for HRDs held in the Philippines in 2019. The event was organised based on the recognition of the mounting threats and harassment HRDs endure and that take a toll on their psychosocial well-being.

Booklet: Psychosocial Well-being for Human Rights Defenders in the Philippines

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[Off-the-shelf] NOSTALGIYA  Antolohiya ng mga Tula -Ni Rene Boy Abiva

NOSTAGIYA

Antolohiya ng mga tula

Ni Rene Boy Abiva

https://www.academia.edu/43211090/NOSTALGIYA

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[Off-the-shelf] Prisons and COVID-19: the real lockdown -APT

Prisons and COVID-19: the real lockdown

A third of the world’s population are facing some level of restriction on their movement as governments attempt to contain the novel coronavirus. Limits on ‘normal’ life range from mass gatherings to complete ‘lockdowns’ with penalties for leaving home without the required paperwork.

Lockdowns have also been seen in national prison systems the world over with fears of the disease ‘rampaging through places of detention’. There is a reason to be fearful. Prisons are notoriously hotbeds for infectious diseases. People live and sleep on top of each other – in the literal sense in some countries – and there is little fresh air, lack of nutritious food, and shortages in healthcare provision as documented in our recent report, Global Prison Trends 2020. To date there have been almost 40,000 cases of infection among people in prison reported and tracked across 60 countries and around 750 deaths in 28 countries – although the numbers will in fact be much higher.

When we look at the lockdowns people in prison are facing, we can see that like with many things, what is happening in the community is not only mirrored in prisons but magnified.

Read full story @www.apt.ch

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[Off-the-shelf] Narito ang mga dapat mong gawin kung nagkaroon ng paglabag ng karapatang pantao sa panahon ng COVID-19 -CHR

[HR101] Narito ang mga dapat mong gawin kung nagkaroon ng paglabag ng karapatang pantao sa panahon ng COVID-19:

Please click the link fo more:

 

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[Off-the-shelf] COVID-19 in detention: prevention, protection and information for visitors -ICRC

COVID-19 in detention: prevention, protection and information for visitors
International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

During such a public health crisis, it is crucial to have good communication with detainees, staff and visitors and ensure measures are taken to prevent the virus’ spread in places of detention.

This is one of three training and awareness videos produced for detaining authorities and the wider public who may be affected by detention.

Further COVID-19 and Detention resources can be found here: https://bit.ly/2xoATBI

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[Off-the-shelf] COVID-19 in detention: prevention, protection and information for detainees -ICRC

COVID-19 in detention: prevention, protection and information for detainees
International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

During such a public health crisis, it is crucial to have good communication with detainees, staff and visitors and ensure measures are taken to prevent the virus’ spread in places of detention.

This is one of three training and awareness videos produced for detaining authorities and the wider public who may be affected by detention.

Further COVID-19 and Detention resources can be found here: https://bit.ly/2xoATBI

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All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc.

 

[Off-the-shelf] COVID-19 in detention: prevention, protection and information for staff -ICRC

COVID-19 in detention: prevention, protection and information for staff -ICRC

During such a public health crisis, it is crucial to have good communication with detainees, staff, and visitors and ensure measures are taken to prevent the virus’ spread in places of detention.

This is one of three training and awareness videos produced for detaining authorities and the wider public who may be affected by detention.

Further COVID-19 and Detention resources can be found here: https://bit.ly/2xoATBI

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Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

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[Off-the-shelf] SOLIDAGRO Anto sa yugto ng pandemiko – Tinipon ni RB Abiva

Magandang araw!

Batid ng lahat na malaganap ngayon sa buong daigdig ang COVID-19.

Hindi na ito bago sa kasaysayan ng daigdig. Noong 1340, sa Europa’y kumalat ang tinatawag na Black Death o Bubonic Plague. Ayon sa mga historyador, halos 400 na taon nanalasa ang nasabing sakit. At hindi rito nagtatapos. Taong 1918, pagkatapos ng Unang Digmaang Mundiyal, ay muling lumaganap ang isang pandemiya na higit na malakas sa Black Death. Ito ang Spanish Plague. Tinatayang noong 1920 ay umabot sa 50-100 milyon katao ang nasawi.
Sa kabilang banda, habang tayo’y nasa yugto ng Enhanced Community Quarantine, minabuti naming tipunin ang aming mga akda. Ang pangkalahatang layo’y maipakita, sa anyo ng tula, ang aming simpatya sa sambayanang Pilipino, sa santinakpan, at sa mga may mabubuting budhi na lingkod-bayan.

Ito ang ibig sabihin ng solidágro, solidaridad, pagbibigkis, o fraternidad.

Isa pang layunin ng kalipunang ito ay mapanatiling buhay ang pagiging malikhain ng mamamayan. Maisasalba lamang ito sa kumunoy ng buryong kung mapapanatili natin ang tradisyon ng pagbabasa, pagsusulat, at pakikisangkot. Kitang-kita naman ang maraming manipestasyon sa social media. Tandaan na mamamayan ang wika nga’y tagapaglikha ng kasaysayan.

Sa koleksiyong ito’y nagsama-sama ang mga makatang mula o nagmula sa magkakaibang istilo, tradisyon, lente, tensiyon, at intensiyon upang bigyan, kahit papaano, ng mukha ang kasalukuyang personal at indibidwal na danas ng bayan at lipunan. Halu-halong kalamay wika nga. Pero ganito naman dapat. Sa yugtong tila nasa harapan na natin ang pintuan ng langit at impiyerno’y wala tayong aasahan kundi ang lakas ng bawat isa.
Mahalagang makita at mabatid sa malikhaing pagtatala na ito hinggil sa kung paano tinugunan o tinutugunan (ng makata) ang tugon ng pamahaalan, ng pribadong sektor, at ng mamamayan ang pandemya.

Nawa’y hindi tayo malulong sa pantasya ng social distancing. Sa panahon ng krisis, higit nating kailangan ang social solidarity. Ang nauna’y walang ibang ibig sabihin kundi ang magkanya-kanya. Habang ang huli’y higit na pagkakaisa. Magkaibang-magkaiba.

Nais kong magpasalamat sa mga Makata ng Bayan na sina Christobal Alipio, Arlan Camba, Ryan Damaso, Joshua Diokno, Juan Ekis, Andyleen Feje, Jenny Linares, Marvin Lobos, John Christopher Lubag, Renz Rosario, at Domingo Santos sapagkat hindi nila binigo ang tawag ng panahon.

Hindi ko na pahahabain pa ang aking litanya. Kayo na ang humusga sa mga obrang naririto kung natugunan ba nito/nila ang pangangailangan ng panahon.
Muli, isang malaya, ligtas, matatag, at puno ng pag-ibig at pananalig sa kapwa na pagbabasa.

Mabuhay ang Sambayanan!
Mabuhay ang Solidágro!
R.B. Abiva
11 ng Abril, 2020
Bayan ng Magbubukid

Pls click the link to read the collection Solidagro-EBook

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[Off-the-shelf] BUILDING OUR RESPONSE ON COVID-19 AND DETENTION -OMCT Guidance brief to the SOS-Torture Network and partner organizations

BUILDING OUR RESPONSE ON COVID-19 AND DETENTION
OMCT Guidance brief to the SOS-Torture Network and partner organizations

This brief intends to provide evidence-based support and good practices for the protection of one of the most vulnerable groups of individuals affected by the COVID-19 outbreak: those deprived of liberty. It is addressed to members of the global SOS -Torture Network but may be used by any organization acting on people in custody.

It aims to inform advocacy, legal actions, other forms of support or dialogue with authorities, detention or penitentiary services, the media or the public on the protection of detainees in the present crisis. It focuses on the situation of those behind bars, detained and deprived of liberty. It also addresses the emerging issue of ill-treatment and criminalization of those breaking confinement rules.

The document is built on experiences of SOS-Torture Network members and core partner organizations of the OMCT, who act to protect detainees, seek their release, provide
physical and mental protection, legal support or mitigate the impact on the confinement, and who monitor human rights violations in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.
We hope that this information can help and encourage others who are facing similar challenges, as both the virus and confinement response are spreading further from
country to country and from region to region.

The brief is not a collection of legal human rights standards, though it is informed by law. It is focused on those formally deprived of liberty while recognizing that there may
be other situations requiring similar actions, such as those in migration camps. It is in no way an exhaustive list of all relevant detention issues and does not cover all detention realities, which often differ even within the same country. Instead, the note touches on key items that have been at the forefront of SOS-Torture Network advocacy. More detailed policy papers and recommendations by international partners are annexed.

BUILDING OUR RESPONSE ON COVID-19 AND DETENTION
OMCT Guidance brief to the SOS-Torture Network and partner organizations omct_covid19_prisonsresponse_en

https://www.omct.org/monitoring-protection-mechanisms/reports-and-publications/2020/04/d25784/

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Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc.

[Off-the-shelf] States of emergencies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic -CCPR

The following information reflects measures taken by states in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic that may influence the state’s ability to ensure the rights and obligations protected by the ICCPR. The geo-map below serves to visually illustrate whether a state of emergency exists and whether the UN has received a notification on the basis of a simple index that assigns a darker blue hue to states with a declared state of emergency, and a lack of notification to the Committee. It should directly be qualified that this index cannot account for states wherein a de facto state of emergency exists as a result of measures imposed. It is based upon data collected through primary and secondary sources by the CCPR and partners and has been limited to states who have ratified the ICCPR.

Read more @datastudio.google.com

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc.

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