Tag Archives: Violence against women

[Press Release] Commission on Human Rights Issues Resolution on ‘Rape-Joke’ Case -CHR

Commission on Human Rights Issues Resolution on ‘Rape-Joke’ Case

chito duterte copy

CHR logoThe Commission on Human Rights (CHR) today released its resolution on Case No.
2016-078 involving the complaint filed by women leaders against Mayor Rodrigo Duterte
for Violation of the Magna Carta of Women for words & acts by him during the Presidential
campaign.

The CHR, in the dispositive part of the resolution, found the words & actions of
Mayor Duterte to be discriminatory of women that is enjoined by the Magna Carta of
Women. The CHR has asked the Civil Service Commission (CSC) and the Department of
Interior and Local Government (DILG) to consider taking appropriate measures for the
violation of the Magna Carta by Mayor Duterte.

Chairperson Chito Gascon said that, “The CHR has the sacred constitutional duty to
protect human rights and to call out persons when these rights are violated no matter what
their position in society may be. The Commission beheves that this mandate does not
exculpate Mayor Duterte from acts committed or words uttered in the course of the
electoral campaign when it involves breaches to fundamental rights, in this case, the
prohibition of gender-based discrimination and violence,”

The same resolution had also made further recommendations to other government
agencies to take positive steps to prevent similar incidents from further happening, to wit:

1. For the Congress to revisit the Magna Carta of Women and to include other
punitive sanctions for direct violations by individuals of the rights
enumerated therein; and to amend Republic Act No. 7877, otherwise known
as the Anti-Sexual Harassment Act, in order to require all employers to
conduct yearly gender sensitivity seminars for all its employees;
2. For the Commission on Elections to ordain and institute a code of conduct for
candidates for public office and political parties to adhere to gender-sensitive
language and conduct during campaigns, and to promote the rights of
women;
3. For the Department of Education and the Commission on Higher Education,
and other educational institutions, to incorporate gender mainstreaming and
gender sensitivity education in their curricula in order to foster a culture of
respect for the rights of women; and

4. For the Civil Service Commission to study the passage of a resolution
requiring all government officials to undergo yearly gender sensitivity
seminars pursuant to Philippine obligations under the Magna Carta of
Women and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of
Discrimination against Women, and to adopt measures to eliminate
prejudices and customary practices that are anchored on the idea of the
inferiority of either of the sexes or their stereotypical roles.

CHR expressed hope that because this complaint had been given due course and
that after serious consideration a resolution on the matter has been issued involving the
conduct of Mayor Duterte, that all stakeholders and in particular public officials would
at all times deport themselves in fully respecting the rights of women guaranteed by the
Magna Carta of Women.

CONTACT PERSON:
ATTY. KRISSI SHAFINNA TWYLA RUBIN
Gender Equality and Women’s Human Rights Center
09175874660 / 294-8640
Karapatang Pantao: Likas Sa Atin, Tungkulin Natin
Commonwealth Avenue, UP, Complex, Diliman, 1101, Quezon City, Philippines
Tel. Nos, 927-0172 • 928^2018

Republika ng Pilipinas
Komisyon ng Karapatang Pantao ng Pilipinas
(Commission on Human Rights of the Philippines)
OFFICIAL RELEASE
25 May 2016
Ref. Case No. 2016-078

[Event] Women’s Access to Justice in the Age of Technology: corporate and domestic legal remedies for cases of ICT-related violence against women -FMA/WLB

Women’s Access to Justice in the Age of Technology: corporate and domestic legal remedies for cases of ICT-related violence against women

Information and Communications Technology (ICT)-related violence against women (VAW) is increasingly becoming part of women’s experience of violence and their online interactions. The harms and violations against women perpetrated through and within ICTs have been, for the most part, seen as trivial, receiving inadequate and inappropriate response from the different actors such as the state, the private sector, the civil society and even women themselves.

FMA
It is in this context that Foundation for Media Alternatives and Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau worked together on a research funded by the Association for Progressive Communications that examined the availability and effectiveness of existing domestic legal remedies for victim-survivors of ICT-related VAW and to prevent such violence. The research explored ICT-related VAW by mapping the existing domestic legal remedies and conducting case studies. Using access to justice framework, the research looked at ICT-related VAW as a product of a hierarchical system of oppression. It interrogated the intersectionality of discrimination women face whilst mindful of the continuum of violence experienced by women, and the continuum of agency and empowerment that women, both individually and collectively, exercised.

In line with this, we would like to invite you in the forum entitled, “Women’s Access to Justice in the Age of Technology: corporate and domestic legal remedies for cases of ICT-related violence against women” to present the result of the study. This will be held on 18 September 2014, from 1:00 – 4:00 pm at Fersal Hotel, Kalayaan Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City. We hope you can attend and engage in a meaningful discussion in relation to the findings of the study.

For more information call Tel. 435-6684.

ALAN ALEGRE
Executive Director
Foundation for Media Alternatives

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[Event] One Billion Rising for Justice -V-Day

Photo extracted from V-Day FB page

Photo extracted from V-Day FB page

On 14 February 2013, one billion people in 207 countries rose and danced to demand an end to violence against women and girls.

On 14 February 2014, we are escalating our efforts, calling on women and men everywhere to RISE, RELEASE, DANCE and demand JUSTICE!

ONE BILLION RISING FOR JUSTICE is a global call to women survivors of violence and those who love them to gather safely in community outside places where they are entitled to justice – courts, police stations, government offices, colleges, work places, places of worship, homes. It is a call to survivors to break the silence and release their stories – politically, spiritually, outrageously – through art, dance, marches, ritual, song, spoken word, testimonies and whatever way feels right.

V day

Our stories have been buried, denied, erased, altered and minimized by patriarchal systems that allow impunity to reign. Justice begins when we speak, release and acknowledge the truth in solidarity and community. ONE BILLION RISING FOR JUSTICE is an invitation to break free from confinement, obligation, shame, guilt, grief, pain, humiliation, rage, and bondage.

It is a call to bring on revolutionary justice.

Begin to imagine what Rising for Justice looks like for you, your community, your city, your country.

Our website will expand in September with more features and we look forward to highlighting your ideas.

In 2013 We Shook The Earth, See What One Billion People Rising Looks Like click links below…

About

https://www.facebook.com/vday

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[Press Release] Health advocates push for the allocation of funds for women andchildren-friendly safety spaces in disaster and conflict areas – ABI HEALTH

On the week of the 18-Day Campaign to End Violence Against Women (VAW)
Health advocates push for the allocation of funds for women andchildren-friendly safety spaces in disaster and conflict areas
December 13, 2013
ALTERNATIVE BUDGET INITIATIVE (ABI) – HEALTH

Press Release
10 December 2013

On the day of the open Bicameral Conference (BICAM) and on the week of the18-Day Campaign to End VAW, health and women rights advocates pushedlegislators to allocate funds, sourced from the approved PhP100-billionCalamity and Rehabilitation Fund and PhP14.6-billion Supplemental budget, forthe establishment of women and children-friendly safety spaces in disasterand conflict-affected areas.

ABI Health Cluster copy

According to Mercy Fabros of the Alternative Budget Initiative HealthCluster (ABI-Health), “our call today is very timely. As we commemorate the18-Day Campaign to End VAW, our society especially our government shouldvow to protect its women and children against violence and abuse. Sincefunds are available for calamity and rehabilitation, let us allocate a goodportion to build safety spaces for women, children and other vulnerablesectors in disaster-ravaged communities.”

Women and children-friendly spaces are places where these sectors cansafely do their everyday routine, move around, sleep, breastfeed, play andwatch over their children anytime of the day especially at night. It is anaccessible space for the internally-displaced women and girls where theirwelfare is promoted and organized, gender-responsive services are provided.

“This early, we have been hearing stories of sexual abuse and exploitationfrom the ground being experienced by both survivors and caregivers. This isunacceptable! For us, even in emergency situations like this, order,security and protection should never be compromised. In fact, it should bea standard operating procedure integrated in the government’s immediateresponse to disasters and conflicts,” Fabros stressed.

In the lined-up amendments of the Senate for the 2014 National GovernmentBudget, almost a total of PhP144-billion has been identified to be spentfor disaster-related expenses such quick response, disaster risk reductionmanagement (DRRM), relief and reconstruction. “We just hope that there is aplace for women and children in the allocation of these identified funds,not only for infrastructure but also for the protective mechanisms thatcome along with it,” Fabros added.

Lessons and reports from international disasters such as Hurricane Katrina,Haiti earthquake and the Indian Ocean tsunami have shown that rape andsexual violence are not isolated incidents, but are part of a pattern ofbehaviour in disaster situations. While major relief agencies nowacknowledge this, gender-based violence is still generally a marginal issueand remains invisible in the public mind and under-reported by media.

Reports from the ground show that the same trend is happening now inYolanda-stricken areas where almost 75-80% of women and children survivorshave increased vulnerability to sexual exploitation and abuse. If this isnot prevented, about two percent or 61,000 women and girls (15-49 yearsold) will most likely experience such in humanitarian setting.

“At this time when there is a seeming quieting after the chaos, thegovernment might be able to listen well enough to the voices from theground especially that of the vulnerable women and children about theirneeds and plans for the future. To end VAW is everybody’s duty as what thisyear’s theme of the 18-day campaign says. However, the government shouldspearhead this. The allocation of funds for the protection of women andchildren including their long-term preparedness is one big step in theright direction,” Fabros said.

The ABI-Health Cluster is composed of 62 member organizations advocatingfor Universal Health Care. It is one of the clusters of ABI along withEducation, Agriculture, Social Protection, Environment and Persons withDisabilities Clusters. It is attached to Social Watch Philippines (SWP), anetwork of a hundred nongovernment organizations that, for eight years, hasbeen successfully pushing for increases in the national budgets for socialdevelopment, called for the realignment of P25 Billion allotted to theunconstitutional Priority Development Assistance Funds (PDAF) to nationalgovernment agencies’ programs to help victims of disasters and prevent moretragedies caused by super typhoons and other calamities. #30#

Quotes from this PR were used for the Dec 12 Editorial of the Manila Standard Today
<http://manilastandardtoday.com/2013/12/12/help-for-the-vulnerable/&gt;

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[Event] 18-Day Campaign to End Violence Against Women (VAW) 2013 -www.pcw.gov.ph

18-Day Campaign to End Violence Against Women (VAW) 2013

Theme:
End VAW Now! It’s Our Duty!
Monday, November 25, 2013 to Thursday, December 12, 2013

Since 2002, the Philippines has been actively joining the 16 days of activism against gender-based violence that is being observed globally from November 25 to December 10. Said campaign calls for the elimination of all forms of violence against women through awareness-raising about gender-based violence, strengthening local work and establishing a clear link between local and international work to end VAW, among other undertakings.

18-day-campaign-logo_0

In 2006, through Presidential Proclamation 1172, the Philippine campaign was extended to 18 days, to include December 12 which is known as the Anti-Trafficking in Persons Day.

This year, the country’s commitment to the observance was strengthened as President Benigno S. Aquino III signed the Republic Act 10398 declaring November 25 of every year as the “National Consciousness Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and Children.” The law also raises the standard by which this campaign is observed by mandating key agencies to undertake activities designed to raise public awareness on VAW.

With the theme: “End VAW Now! It’s Our Duty!” the call will emphasize the importance of having a functional mechanism, operated by competent and capable duty-bearers with a sense of responsibility and accountability originating from a deep understanding of the fundamental principles of gender-based violence and the provisions of VAW laws.

Read full article @www.pcw.gov.ph

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[Featured video] March 8, 2013 International Women’s Day by ClydieCandy

March 8, 2013 International Women’s Day
by clydiecandy

A feminist flashmob organized by World March of Women-Philippines, participated by Women Human Rights Defenders from different NGOs in the Philippines.

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[Statement] Enforced Disappearance: a State-perpetrated violence against women -AFAD

AFAD Statement
In Solidarity with the One Billion Rising Global Call to Stop Violence Against Women
February 14, 2013

 

Enforced Disappearance: a State-perpetrated violence against women

AFADThe women victims and families of victims of enforced disappearances join the global call to STOP VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN.

Violence against women is pervasive. The increasing incidence of rape, domestic violence, discrimination and other forms of violence among women in both peace and war times must be stopped.

The families of victims and survivors of enforced disappearance, majority of them being women, share the deep emotional toll felt by women victims of violence. They are the wives, daughters, sisters, mothers, mothers-in-law,grandmothers and aunties, who continue to search for their loved ones without certainty of finding them. Some of theaging others died without seeing their sons and daughters alive, or at least their remains if they were killed. Most victims remain disappeared [L1] while some were found dead. Very few were fortunate to be found alive and later on freed. Women disappeared who surfaced or were found alive told their stories of sexual assaults and other forms of violence.

In most situations, the disappeared victims were the primary, if not, sole breadwinners. With their disappearance, the burden of providing for the needs of the family who are left behind rests on women. They are mostly left alone to carry on the responsibility of nurturing the family, especially for those who have small children to take care of.

The disappearance deeply affects the emotional, psychological, economic, political and social well-being of women. With limited or absence of professional help to cope with the trauma of disappearance and the sheer responsibility and expectations of society, women have no other choice but to bravely confront these challenges mostly by themselves or with some support of immediate families..

Enforced disappearance is a State-perpetrated violence against women

Enforced disappearance is one of the worst forms of human rights violation. It is a continuing crime that starts when “a person is arrested, detained or his/her liberty deprived and his whereabouts undisclosed. It is perpetrated by agents of the State or persons or groups acting with the authorization, support and consent of the State.It is followed by the refusal of the State “to acknowledge the deprivation of liberty or by concealment of the fate or whereabouts of the disappeared person, which places such a person outside the protection of the law.”[1]

Most disappearances happened in armed conflict situations or in countries with ongoing struggles for freedom and democracy. Majority of the disappeared victims are men.Women victims are vulnerable to more abuses, such as rape among others. Their bodies became instruments of war.

Survivors of enforced disappearance and their families receive little attention and assistance from government to address its psycho-emotional, economic, social and political impacts. They have to struggle for it.

In the Philippines, families of the disappeared, many of whom are women lobbied for more than 16 years for the Philippine government to enact a law against enforced disappearance that was finally approved and signed on 21 December 2012. In Thailand, their campaign for reparation gained some inroads. The government provided THB 100,000.00 (US$ 3,355.70) to some victims from Southern Thailand. They now have a Committee for Compensation of People Affected by Unrest in the Southern Border Provinces, which recommended that Government pay reparation to several cases of enforced disappearances from January 2004 to 30 September 2011.[2]

In Nepal, relatives of more than 1,300 disappeared have been pressuring their government to enact into a law the bill on enforced disappearance.In Indonesia, lobby efforts are being intensified for the administration to make good its promise of ratifying the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons Against Enforced Disappearance.

Enforced disappearance renders women more vulnerable to exploitation and marginalization

“In societies where gender-based discrimination in laws and policies hinders the full realization of the human rights of women and limits their autonomy and participation in aspects of public and political life, the social and economic impact of disappearances is felt more strongly,it renders women and their children more vulnerable to exploitation and marginalization”.(Deputy Commissioner for Human Rights Kyung-wha Kang).[3]

In South Asia for instance, there are women who are considered “half-widows” and could not claim the benefits and pieces of property left behind by their disappeared husbands due to absence of necessary legal documents such as death certificates.

Some of the women who have been brave enough to continue their search experience harassments and other forms of marginalization. SandyaEknelygoda of Sri Lanka has to endure threatening calls in her search for her journalist-husband, Prageeth. She eventually lost her employment but persists on her demand for justice, despite the economic difficulties and responsibility of raising her two sons.

Majority of the women in Asian countries with repressive governments such as in Sri Lanka, in Indian-administered Jammu and Kashmir, are in more difficult situations. Enforced disappearance is continually happening and their governments continue to defy local as well as international pressures. In these countries, too, discrimination of women is deeply embedded.The Indian caste system is an example.

The struggle for justice, reparation, memory and guarantees for non-recurrence is still a long way for majority of the relatives and families of victims of enforced disappearance. But it gets inspiration from the strength of other women victims of violence.

Today, they join the One Billion Women Rising in their global call to STRIKE, DANCE and RISE! DEMAND STATE ACCOUNTABILITY for the increasing violence against women!

Signed and authenticated by:

MUGIYANTO                                                                    MARY AILEEN BACALSO
Chairperson                                                                         Secretary-General

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[Event] Love is…Freedom from Violence!

Love is…Freedom from Violence!
On the 14th of February 2013, we join a global strike to demand an end to violence against women or VAW.

1BILLION RISING photo by Ging Cristobal

1BILLION RISING photo by Ging Cristobal

This is our independent contribution to the campaign, led by the World March of Women – Pilipinas and organizations who participated in the first flashmob (Dec. 10, 2012) – Alliance of Progressive Labor – Women, Bagong Kamalayan, Batis-AWARE, Buklod, CATW-AP, Center for Migrant Advocacy (CMA), Kaisa Ka, Sarilaya, Pambansang Koalisyon ng Kababaihan sa Kanayunan (PKKK), WomanHealth, Focus on the Global South, Foundation for Media Alternatives, KAISA – Nagkakaisang Iskolar para sa Pamantasan at Sambayanan – UP Diliman, Partido ng Manggagawa (PM), Tigra, UP Manila students, Women’s Crisis Center (WCC), and Youth and Students Advancing Gender Equality (YSAGE).

The first flashmob video can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANvbHoc2GyM

The international call was received by the lead organizations from the European Women’s Lobby. We have decided that this is a critical moment to contribute to the widening and deepening resistance to violence against women, in the wake of epidemic of rapes in India. This becomes urgent as in the Philippines, one in 10 women aged 15-49 experienced sexual violence, and for deaf women, it is 1 in every 3 women raped. There has been increase in violence against indigenous women especially in mining communities, including the recent murder of a pregnant woman in Tampakan. We see the rise in hate crimes against lesbians. There has been steady growth in the prostitution of women and children as the climate and capitalist crises continue.

Flashmob was held last Feb. 14 at 9am, the ‘characters’ were lesbian lovers, flowers and lollipop sellers, dvd vendor, and to blend with the crowd in the area, wearing costumes as fast food worker, street sweeper, cook, waitress, MMDA, etc. The first to enter was the traffic enforcer in the middle of this intersection. LBT dancers from a colored beetle, and one or two danced on top of one vehicle, ala-“Step Up Revolution.” Towards the end, a streamer was unfurled, which bears this text: “BABAE – hindi pag-aari, hindi kalakal, hindi laruan… May sariling katauhan!”

Here is the video of the latest flashmob rehearsal: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a10KZ_GGe-E.

Additonal participating groups are Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau (WLB), Amnesty International – Pilipinas (AI), BATIS, Kasibulan, WAGI, WEDPRO, and numerous individuals who joined through the event’s facebook page.

Let’s continue uniting to end all forms of violence against women!

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[Event] Global campaign targeting violence against women -One Billion Rising

Global campaign targeting violence against women
February 05, 2013

one-billion-logo-square-640x550The US-based One Billion Rising campaign is calling for 1 billion women and men around the world to raise awareness of violence against women by walking out and dancing on the streets on Feb. 14, said the Garden of Hope Foundation, which is heading the campaign in Taiwan.

Janelle Chung (鍾曉慧), a Singaporean who is in Taiwan for a 63-day cycling tour around the nation to celebrate her 30th birthday, said she hopes to recruit at least 1,000 Taiwanese to join the movement.

Chung said that before coming to Taiwan she read about the internationally reported case of an Indian woman who died following a gang rape in New Delhi, prompting her to join the foundation’s initiative.

She also hoped that people will buy the foundation’s Hakka flower-pattern headscarf, the proceeds of which will be donated to female victims of violence and child welfare activities, she said.

The name of the One Billion Rising campaign is based on statistics indicating that one in three women on the planet will be beaten or raped during their lifetime, the foundation said.

With the world population at 7 billion, this adds up to more than 1 billion women and girls who are living under such risk, it said.

The campaign was initiated by the US-based nonprofit V-Day organization, which was founded 15 years ago by playwright Eve Ensler, whose play The Vagina Monologues grabbed the world’s attention.

The One Billion Rising campaign is V-Day’s most ambitions project, with more than 5,000 organizations and 161 countries having signed up to participate, the foundation said.

Following stops last year in countries including Australia, the US, the UK and the Philippines, Ensler will visit India and Bangladesh this month.

Source: http://onebillionrising.org/

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[Campaign] V-MEN -Even the men are rising against poverty and violence

V Men

V-MEN are the men who rise with the women in advocating for women’s rights and an end to all forms of violence against women. STRIKE! DANCE! RISE!

Visit and like V-MEN @https://www.facebook.com/vmen.philippines

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[Event] Call to #TakeBacktheTech to Promote and Protect Women’s Human Rights in the Philippines

Sign up for 16 days of blogging on your thoughts around violence against women. Start a debate, share an idea, document your experience, pass on information, exercise your right to expression to end violence against women. Blog with us!

Call to #TakeBacktheTech to Promote and Protect Women’s Human Rights in the Philippines

We have seen how thousands of Filipinos mobilize to protect Internet Freedom against the Philippine CyberMartialLaw. For the 16 days of activism against gender-based violence let us be proactive and once again make use of information and communication technology – ICT-to create an online culture that protect women and girls from violence. Let us create an online space that is safe and secure; that provide women and girls venue for empowerment. Let us mobilize to make the abuse heard. Let us collectively provide alternative mechanisms to address women’s rights violations through ICTs and on ICT platforms. We have to stand together and take control of technology to make sure that we strengthen our freedoms. Let us amplify our united voice and demand what we all want – FREEDOMS not FEARS.

Read more @ https://www.takebackthetech.net

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[In the news] Statistics on various crimes against women alarming – CWR – Bulatlat

Statistics on various crimes against women alarming – CWR – Bulatlat.

By INA ALLECO R. SILVERIO
Bulatlat.com
March 9, 2012

On the occasion of International Women’s Day, March 8, the Center for Women’s Resources (CWR) said that despite the existence and supposed enforcement of 37 Philippine laws, executive orders, resolutions that are supposed to protect and serve the welfare and development of women, violence against them continues.

The group defines violence against women as “an act or series of acts that involves coercion, intimidation, threat, and/or deception. It causes physical, sexual or psychological harm. The CWR also explained that violence against women also includes the neglect of women’s interests, needs, and welfare.

Victims of political repression

Listing what it said were “sins” being committed against Filipino women on a daily basis, the CWR said the Benigno Aquino III administration has yet to prove that it is genuinely pro-women. It also said the armed forces of the government are using violence against women as a means of political repression.

From July 2010 to December 2011, six women fell victim to extra-judicial killings that were politically-motivated. There are currently 35 women political prisoners in different jails in the country. Detained women are more vulnerable to sexual abuse and torture as seen in the cases of former political detainee and now Selda secretary general Angie Ipong and the women belonging to the Morong 43.

Out of the government’s 23 women detainees, 16 reported being subjected to torture.

Apart from the serious implications of political repression, counted among the more serious violations being perpetrated against women is the act of rape. Based on data from the Philippine National Police (PNP) and the Women’s Crisis and Child Protection Center (WCCPC) , there were 14,201 recorded cases of rape (76.56 percent of all crimes committed against women of a sexual nature), attempted rape (18.68 percent) and incestuous rape (5.74 percent) from January 2000 to August 2011.

From January 2011 to June that same year, there were 28 recorded cases of gang rape.

Another shocking statistic is that one child is raped every two hours and 30 minutes.

In the meantime, based from CWR’s 2012 monitoring records, the youngest victim of rape is three years old while the oldest is 86 years old. Majority or 54 percent of the victims are within the ages of 11 to 20 years old.

The CWR also recorded that from January to June 2011, there were 13 recorded cases of rape perpetrated by elements of the police, military, and paramilitary institutions of the Aquino government.

Only last month, the activist women’s group Gabriela launched a campaign demanding the arrest of six soldiers accused of raping a civilian in Masbate. The 21-year old victim charged the six soldiers, at the Masbate prosecutor’s office, of gang raping her on January 30 and again on February 2 inside the Bravo Company of the Army 9th Infantry Battalion camp in the town of Milagros.

Sexual harassment also remains a serious offense against Filipino women.

From January 2000 to August 2011, there were 757 recorded cases of sexual harassment or five (5) cases per month. In the meantime, the PNP-WCPC also said that one child becomes a victim of sexual harassment every seven hours.

On the home front, women are not spared from violence from their partners and spouses.

From January 2011 to August 2011, the CWR noted that police institutions recorded 5,989 cases of domestic violence as defined by Republic Act 9262. This translates to 748 cases per month, 25 cases per day or one case every 57 minutes and 36 seconds.

More startling is the report that from 2006 to 2011, a total of 29,737 cases of domestic violence were recorded by the PNP-WCPC from 2004 to August 2011.

The crimes of sex trafficking, prostitution and white slavery also continue to victimize women.

From January 2000 to August 2011, there were 619 recorded cases of trafficking. Some 500,000 women fell victim to prostitution during the same period, and 100,000 of these victims were children.

One recent case is that of eight women, four of them minors, who were rescued from a Korean bar in Baguio City. They came from Davao City and were promised high-paying jobs.

Poor maternal and health care

The other crimes being committed against women come in commonplace but no less outrageous forms.

The CWR said that despite the government’s promises to uplift maternal health and childcare services, most Filipino women still do not have access or have only limited access to the same.

Citing reports from the Department of Health and other sources, the CWR said 60 percent of birth deliveries occur at home where two out of three are delivered by an unskilled attendant. Only 25 percent of poor pregnant women are able to undergo medical checkups and give birth with the assistance of doctors or nurses.

Despite developments in global health care, leading causes of maternal mortality in the Philippines include complications related to pregnancy occurring in the course of labor, delivery and puerperium, hypertension complicating pregnancy, postpartum hemorrhage. All these complications can be easily prevented if the patients have been given proper medical attention.

Read full article @ bulatlat.com

[Press release] Women still in chains of poverty and abuse – Labor NGO -CTUHR

Women still in chains of poverty and abuse – Labor NGO

As the world celebrates 101 years of the historic International Women’s Day, labor NGO Center for Trade Union and Human Rights said that women are still “tied to the chains of poverty and abuse.” Daisy Arago, executive director of CTUHR said, “After more than a century of celebrating the women’s fight for liberation, women all over the world are still tied to the chains of poverty and abuse. Corporate greed for profits and globalization policies have resulted to deeper crises for women especially in the neo-colonies like the Philippines.”

“The state policy of deregulation of oil prices in the Philippines brought about unabated price hikes. In the 2012 alone, oil prices have increased by as much as P5 per liter. And while oil companies squeeze more profits from the people, women together with their families are made to suffer hunger and deteriorating quality of life.”

“The diminishing value of wages due to relentless price hikes adversely affects women and their families. Not only do women resort to
belt-tightening measures to stretch the family’s daily budget, in the banana plantations of Mindanao for example, women are forced to leave their children and accept casual positions that are paid as low as Php 125 a day to augment the family’s income.” Arago also added that despite the so-called ‘equal opportunities’ accorded to women and the growing women’s labor participation rate, women workers remain subject to vulnerable employment. “Within the framework of more flexible production, women are encouraged to work at night and to join the labor force largely as casual employees. Moreover, most women are employed in jobs that lack social protection like domestic work. Previous studies have also shown that women generally have lower wages lower than men in the Philippines.”

Sexual abuse and violence against women are also continuing problems not only at home but in the workplace. Because of increased competition between the employed and unemployed, women become easy victims to various forms of harassment and sexual abuse by their employers only to gain or keep their jobs.”

Challenges

Arago challenged the Aquino administration to put forth programs that will truly end the root causes of abuse and exploitation of women. “Programs
like the CCT, Pantawid Pasada among others are but remedial solutions to poverty. What we need are real programs that can develop our agrarian
economy and our national industries so that our people and our women can be freed from poverty, exploitation and oppression.”

“To the women and people’s movement, the challenge remains to persevere in the struggle not just for political freedom and for gender equality but
ultimately against exploitative and oppressive policies that is driving women into deeper destitution,” Arago added.

RELEASE
07 March 2012
Reference: Daisy Arago, Executive Director, Center for Trade Union and
Human Rights, +6392.411.0256
*A century and a year since the first IWD, *

[From the web] Third Press Release of the ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC)

Third Press Release of the ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC)

Vientiane, Lao PDR, 18 February 2012

The ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) concluded its Fourth Meeting which was convened from 16-18 February 2012 in Vientiane, Lao PDR.

At this Meeting, the ACWC’s work plan for 2012-2016 was concretized to ensure that the Commission’s journey in the next five years would bring impacts to women and children in the region. Among the activities/projects identified are publication of the compilation of good practices in combating violence against women and children in ASEAN and establishment of an ACWC network of social service agencies involved in preventing, protecting and helping victims of violence against women and children in ASEAN.

Projects and activities that were identified at the ACWC’s Consultation Meeting with the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General on Violence against Children (SRSG-VAC) and prominent international experts on elimination of violence against women on 16-17 January 2012, and the ACWC’s Dialogue with civil society on 18 January 2012 in Manila, the Philippines, were taken into consideration in developing ACWC’s 2012-2016 work plan.

Read full article @ www.asean.org

[Statement] Joint Statement of the ACWC and the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General on Violence against Children | SRSG on Violence Against Children

Joint Statement of the ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) and the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General on Violence against Children | SRSG on Violence Against Children.

 Manila, the Philippines -The ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) convened a Consultative Meeting with the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General on Violence against Children (SRSG-VAC) and CEDAW Committee experts on violence against women in Manila, the Philippines, on 16-17 January 2012. The Consultation was supported by UN Women and UNICEF.

Marta Santos Pais, Special Representative of the UN Sec Gen

The Consultation provided an opportunity to exchange views on a rights-based approach to initiatives designed to prevent and address all forms of violence against children (VAC) and violence against women (VAW), in the light of international human rights standards, in particular the Convention on the Rights

of the Child (CRC) and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), both ratified by all ASEAN Member States.

The Consultation helped to highlight good practices and experiences on the implementation of laws, policies and actions aimed at overcoming the invisibility of violence, promoting an integrated agenda for violence prevention and elimination, and improving the availability and quality of data and research on the magnitude and incidence of violence against children and violence against women.

The Commission welcomed the insightful information provided by the SRSGVAC on the process of follow-up to the recommendations of the UN Study on Violence against Children promoted in countries around the globe, and the experience gained from cooperation developed between her mandate and regional organizations and institutions aiming at building a world free from violence.

The Commission recognized the importance and potential of enhancing opportunities for dialogue and cooperation with strategic partners at the national, regional and international levels, including with the United Nations system, to accelerate progress towards the elimination of violence against children and

violence against women.

The Commission and the SRSG-VAC expressed commitment to pursue collaboration in the context of the ACWC’s mandate for the promotion and protection of the rights of women and children and efforts for violence prevention and response including within the framework of the Commission’s five-year workplan in the following activities:

a. Compiling, documenting and disseminating good practices and studies on the implementation of legislations, programmes, services and strategies to address all forms of VAW and VAC in the region;

b. Conducting regional studies of legal frameworks and response strategies towards the elimination of VAW and VAC in ASEAN Member States;

c. Promoting advocacy and policy development for the prevention and elimination of all forms of VAW and VAC;

d. Promoting, in collaboration with relevant government agencies, the availability and quality of data collection and analysis concerning VAW and VAC in ASEAN Member States;

e. Launching a regional public campaign to eliminate all forms of VAW and VAC in collaboration with the relevant ASEAN sectoral bodies, civil society, religious and local leaders, private sector and other stakeholders;

f. Developing minimum standards of delivery of services to the victims and survivors as well as perpetrators of VAW and VAC;

g. Strengthening the capacity of service providers in ASEAN Member States to prevent and address all forms of VAW and VAC; and

h. Promoting dialogues with other relevant government agencies, civil society and other stakeholders aiming at improving awareness of all forms of VAW and VAC in various sectors.

Source: srsg.violenceagainstchildren.org

[Press Release] The Women’s Caucus: Can we still trust ASEAN?

Despite the hype surrounding the ASEAN Summit in Bali, women from the region found no signs in ASEAN towards advancing women’s human rights and gender equality. Instead they alarmed with the body’s support for the 2014 chairship of Burma, where cases of women’s human rights violations are mounting, among others. Moreover there are qualms over the civil society space in Cambodia when it starts the chairship next year.

“Although Indonesia has been quite open to civil society, this is not a nice touch as Indonesia ends its term and passes the baton to the next chair,” Rena Herdiyani of Kalyanamitra, a member of the South East Asia Women’s Caucus on ASEAN (Women’s Caucus) put it.

“The Burmese Army’s widespread attacks against ethnic civilian communities, especially against women, is an egregious violation of international law and blatantly shows the lack of the rule of law in Burma. We know that you understand the security of women is not a minor issue, but a major problem that has to be addressed before a nation can progress,” the Women’s League of Burma said. The organisation documented 81 cases of rape this year alone.

The ASEAN Summit ended just days before the 16 Days of Activism against Violence Against Women international campaign.

With this development, the Women’s Caucus is watchful of the drafting of the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD). “Women’s human rights must never be a point of negotiations. ASEAN must acknowledge what we are born with, as affirmed by the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and other international human rights instruments.” Herdiyani added.

Last month, the Women’s Caucus formally submitted its input to the AHRD, reiterating human rights such as equality and non-disrimination, freedom from violence, sexual and reproductive health and rights, equal rights in marriage and family life, decent work in local and overseas employment and citizenship especially for refugees and women on the move, among many others.

As the AHRD will be deliberated and adopted under Cambodia’s chairship, the Women’s Caucus call for an open and safe space for civil society next year. “We are not just feminists and activists but we are stakeholders of ASEAN, we have to critically engage with the process, especially as ASEAN is increasingly become a part of our daily lives. There is no way we could do this if ASEAN only wants to hear good things,” Kunthea Chan of Cambodian women’s organisation, Silaka asserted.

The South East Asia Women’s Caucus on ASEAN or the Women’s Caucus is a network of women’s organisations from 11 countries, engaging ASEAN to advance women’s human rights in the region.

27 November 2011
PRESS RELEASE
For immediate release
Contact persons:
Rena Herdiyani, +62 8129820147
Nina Somera, +62 87836563943 and +66 811621073

[Statement] Dakila statement on violence against women

DAKILA STATEMENT ON VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN
November 25, 2011

For many years, women have fought for gender equality and their rightful place in society. And in the past decade or so, it has been said that women have gained leverage from where they stood half a century ago. Today, there are more women presidents leading their countries; CEO’s leading their companies; engineers building infrastructures. As things that were deemed solely for men have now become accessible to women, we cannot deny that indeed, women have come a long way.

But how much equality has really been given to women in this society? Is gender equality really almost achieved as seen by many or are all these just a façade of where women stand in society? How far have women really gone?

We say women have gone far but one thing has not changed over the years – violence against women. This continues to haunt women all over the world. Violence against women such as rape, human trafficking, sexual assault, and domestic violence are still things women have to fear.

When will women feel safe walking home alone at night? When will a woman be able to assert herself without fear that her husband will hit her? When will women stop being violated? Violence against women only shows how much women are being valued – and it’s not that high. Women continue to be objectified and assaulted. Only if and when the fear of violence against women has ceased can we say that women have gained respect and that we have come close to gender equality.

Time and again, women have proven their importance in every aspect of society – from building the family to building the nation. Dakila calls the end to violence against women. We call for our society to allow women to live without fear for it is only when they live fearlessly can they truly grow. And only when women have grown can we truly move forward and develop as a nation.

DAKILA – Philippine Collective for Modern Heroism
Unit 3A, VS1 Bldg., 34 Kalayaan Avenue, Quezon City
Cellular: (0905) 4292539
Tel. No.:(02) 4354309
E-mail:   mabuhay@dakila.org.ph
Website: http://www.dakila.org.ph
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dakila.philippines
Follow us on Twitter: dakila_ph

[From the web] Top UN officials highlight youth leadership in ending violence against women- www.un.org

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon speaks at event to mark International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women

Source: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=40494&Cr=violence+against+women&Cr1=

23 November 2011 –
Top United Nations officials today called for engaging all of society, and especially young people, to end violence against women, a scourge that spans the globe and takes many forms, including rape, domestic violence and harassment at work.

“Whether in developing or developed countries, the pervasiveness of this unacceptable violence should shock us all,” Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said at an event in New York to mark the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.

“Violence – and in many cases the mere threat of it – is one of the most significant barriers to women’s full equality,” he added.

This year’s Day, observed annually on 25 November, focuses on youth leadership in preventing and ending gender-based violence.

“Our challenge,” said Mr. Ban, “is to ensure that the message of ‘zero tolerance’ is heard far and wide. To do that, we must engage all of society – and especially young people – and in particular young men and boys.”

He highlighted the need to promote “healthy models of masculinity,” and in particular encourage young men and boys to become advocates for change.

“I urge governments and partners around the world to harness the energy, ideas and leadership of young people to help us to end this pandemic. Only then will we have a more just, peaceful and equitable world.”

In a separate message for the Day, Mr. Ban said the right of women and girls to live free of violence is “inalienable and fundamental” and enshrined in international human rights and humanitarian law.

It also lies at the heart of the “UNiTE to End Violence against Women” campaign that the Secretary-General launched in 2008 that has galvanized governments, civil society, the corporate sector, athletes, artists, women, men and young people around the world to end the pandemic.

Mr. Ban also urged governments and the private sector to increase their support to the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women, which is marking 15 years of giving grants to support innovative regional, local and national projects.

The fund has delivered grants worth $77 million to 339 initiatives in 126 countries and territories since it was established in 1997. However, demand for support continues to outstrip resources, the Secretary-General said, noting that this year alone, the fund has received more than 2,500 applications requesting nearly $1.2 billion. Mr. Ban said an additional $100 million in annual donations is needed.

The Executive Director of UN Women, Michelle Bachelet, for her part, called on world leaders to mobilize political will and investment to ensure that women can live a life without violence.

“Violence against women is not solely a women’s issue,” she stated in her message for the Day. “It diminishes each and every one of us. We need to come together to end it. By coming together, by standing up against violence against women, we will come closer to peace, justice and equality.”

According to UN Women, 125 countries have specific laws that penalize domestic violence, and equality between women and men is guaranteed in 139 countries and territories. But women continue to be subjected to violence, with estimates indicating that up to six in 10 women have suffered physical and/or sexual violence in their lifetime, a majority from their husbands or partners.

Ms. Bachelet outlined 16 concrete policy actions to end violence against women, including revising laws, providing universal access to emergency services for survivors, engaging men and boys, and bringing perpetrators to justice.

In a related development, the UN released a report today stating that Afghanistan has a long way to go before its women are fully protected from violence and their equality is properly upheld through the landmark Elimination of Violence against Women (EVAW) law enacted two years ago.

The report, produced by the UN human rights office (OHCHR) and the UN mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA), makes 32 recommendations to the Government and its international partners to improve implementation of the law, including raising greater awareness of the law among Afghan women and men and within all levels of the Government.