Tag Archives: Typhoon

[Press Release] Ruby affected communities greet Save the Children with relief as they arrive with essential aid

Ruby affected communities greet Save the Children with relief as they arrive with essential aid

Families who were hit hard by Typhoon ruby over the weekend greeted Save the Children with relief as they arrived to distribute life-saving aid to 2000 people in Sorsogon.

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Save the children response teams rushed to reach  areas impacted by the storm across  Northern Samar, Dolores, Eastern Samar and Calbayog with clean water, materials to fix their houses and essential household items.

It’s estimated that 2 million people were affected as Ruby marched across the country, making landfall around 6 times before leaving the country on Wednesday morning.

Ned Olney Country Director of Save the Children says, “We are here to save lives, and alleviate suffering caused by the typhoon. Ruby was destructive and has caused extensive damage wherever it landed, to homes, communities and livelihoods. Save the Children is in communities distributing life-saving supplies and assessing the extent of the damage as we speak“

On Sunday evening, while Ruby hit their community, Amelita Ngoho, 31 and husband Remy, celebrated the birth of their first baby boy, born during the storm. The baby was born in a town near Ormoc that was badly hit by ‘Yolanda’. The couple were assisted during the birth by experienced midwife Criselda Gluva, 46,  who said she wouldn’t have done it without Save the Children’s ‘BEACON’ box, a storm-proof box that contains clean birthing supplies such as sterile blades, alcohol, flashlight and even a birth certificate, to help a pregnant woman deliver safely during and immediately after a disaster.

Criselda says, “When I found out about ‘Ruby’, I knew there were pregnant women in the village due to give birth that time. I took the BEACON box to our village so that we were prepared”

“It was difficult because there was no electricity but I had everything I needed in the BEACON box to help her deliver safely. I even used the flashlight that was inside.  I thank Save the Children for providing us with the clean birthing kits.”, the midwife added.

Days before landfall, Save the Children staff have been going out communities to tell people to heed evacuation recommendations, providing preparedness messages in child-friendly terms and setting up child-friendly spaces at evacuation centers

“Save the Children has response teams that are ready to go when disasters strike. We have opened new warehouses and had them fully stocked for an emergency such as this. Save the Children had emergency materials ready so we can respond quickly to children and families who need them the most.”, Olney added.

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[Statement] Adopt a human rights-based rehabilitation plan for ‘Yolanda’ victims -NFC

Adopt a human rights-based rehabilitation plan for ‘Yolanda’ victims

We urge the Philippine Government to place the people’s basic human rights up front and center in its rehabilitation plan for those affected by the devastation of Super Typhoon Yolanda (also known by its international name, ‘Haiyan’). Included in these basic rights is the right to adequate food. Indeed, Super Typhoon Yolanda has interrupted the people’s enjoyment of this basic human right, taking its toll especially on the most vulnerable in our midst.

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Any rehabilitation plan must adopt a human rights-based approach, and should ensure the right to adequate food. This is the right of the people to have regular, permanent and unrestricted access, either directly or through purchases, to quantitatively and qualitatively adequate and sufficient food. Such food should correspond to their cultural traditions, and ensure a physical and mental, individual and collective, fulfilling and dignified life that is free of fear.

In this regard, Aurea Miclat-Teves, convenor of the National Food Coalition, suggests that the Philippine Government explore, as possible elements of a rehabilitation plan, the following:
1)sustainable agriculture, which is farming that observes sound ecological principles;
2) resilient cropping, which is farming that anticipates and prepares for adversity, such as extreme weather events, fuel cost spikes, and restricted access to irrigation; and
3) organic farming, which employs crop rotation, green manure, compost,and biological pest control.

These practices are consistent with disaster risk reduction that aims to protect people’s livelihoods from shocks, and to strengthen their capacity to recover from disasters, such as super typhoons. These practices are also in keeping with a human rights-based approach to climate change. As we have stated before, it is essential to align climate policies with the right to adequate food. Climate change-induced super typhoons and other similar events compromise food production and interfere with the right to adequate food.

By way of emphasis, clear and comprehensive polices that promote the right to adequate food are urgently needed. In this regard, we reiterate our call for the immediate adoption by the Philippines of a right to adequate food framework law.

PRESS STATEMENT
13 December 2013

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[Statement] Promoting the Interests of the Few; Trampling on the Rights of the Majority -Kaisa Ka

Promoting the Interests of the Few;
Trampling on the Rights of the Majority

In the wake of super typhoon Yolandas’ devastations and the urgent and long term need of millions of affected people to recover and be rehabilitated, observing Human Rights day should focus on critiquing what the government has done and is doing in the interest of the many who are more vulnerable to disasters.

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The Kilusan sa Pambansang Demokrasya (Kilusan) believes that it is a grave insult on the rights of the Filipino people to have a government that is irresponsible and not responsive to the needs and interests of the overwhelming majority of the people.

After the super typhoon has made millions more of the people several times more vulnerable to impacts of disasters, the government has not even considered suspending laws that promote and safeguard the interests of very few monopoly capitalists only and have proved to be detrimental to the majority.

Even as electric power services have not been restored in the typhoon-ravaged areas, the government allowed MERALCO to increase charges on its electricity consumers/users, which are undoubtedly mostly residential. The commercial consumers on the other hand can simply increase the prices of their goods or costs of their services thus passing on to consumers the burden of paying high electricity costs.

Power rate hikes and continued oil price hikes, including staggering increases in the price of LPG, are disastrous to the people several times over than the immediate impacts of calamities. The government has placed the whole country under a state of calamity but this is to no avail. The price controls imposed in storm-ravaged areas are rendered useless by existing laws especially—Oil deregulation, EPIRA and the EVAT.

By promoting privatization and deregulation laws and policies, the government is abdicating its sworn duty of serving and protecting public interests. At the present stage of pursuing privatization of hospitals and other social services through the PPP scheme, the government has concretely abandoned its duty to the people.

The Philippines lies within a typhoon belt and the Pacific Ring of Fire but the present and past governments have not drawn any long-term, comprehensive disaster preparedness and response plan. Annual government expenditures are not really aligned with the concrete problems and needs of the people for decently earning jobs and livelihoods; for a national land use policy that prioritizes lands for food production, industries and residential areas; for properly guided housing assistance instead of merely giving housing loans; for proper community planning; for health and medical services; and for correct and timely information and systematic and pre-planned evacuation not solely dependent on using public school buildings.

The Philippines has a number of environmentally protective laws but these are not being implemented. They are always compromised in the interest, especially, of foreign capitalists as in the Mining Act, Water Code, Clean Air Act, etc. Evidently, the many mining permits, the reclamation of foreshore areas and tourism obliterate the inland and mangrove forests.

It is ironical that even as the two chambers of Congress passed the supplemental budget to augment the recovery and rehabilitation fund for the victims and survivors of Yolanda’s wrath, this government of political patrons has besmirched record in budget use. New cases of pork barrel scam, SARO scam and misuse of other public funds have just been recently un-earthed.

The PNoy government could perhaps have passing grade for anti-forced disappearance law, compensation for Matial Law victims and the still unimplemented reproductive health law. But this grade will be entombed in the landslide of laws that amount to the whole sale surrender of people’s rights to a few private monopoly interests.

PRESS STATEMENT
December 10, 2013

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[Video] We are the World (COVER by Filipino Artists) -YouTube

We are the World (COVER by Filipino Artists) 

Published on YouTube, Nov 22, 2013, by Chamberlain P. Guevarra
Tatsuo Productions (http://www.tatsuoproductions.com/)
Sapphire Productions
Evolution [Jerry Catarata] (https://www.facebook.com/EVolution.Du…)

For Donations:
http://www.gk1world.com/

In light of the calamity of typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda that left our fellowmen in Southern Visayas helpless.Artists of different ages,genres and backgrounds gather together for one common goal. To make this video as an encouragement to people to open their hearts, lend a helping hand and to thank the nations that offered aid to our country. WE ARE FOREVER GRATEFUL.To our fellow Filipinos, STAY STRONG! United we stand! BANGON VISAYAS! WALANG IWANAN!

Artists:
Antonette Maria Bajamunde,Noreen Isabel Quinamot,Kyle Lemuel Juliano,Tiffany Mae Valdegamo,Enrico Ricardo Nolan,Wilholm Ho,Joel Aba
Jeva Villamil,Lee Abapo,Charyn Ong,Hanna Nicole Tesado,Michael Kent Jugador, Vinz Villarosa,Dezirhyl Genn Ramirez,Rakhim Salatan Tahir,Giancarlo Benguechea and Reymark Seblero of The Robbee Talents Club
Earl Neil Kho and Andy Canlas of Midnasty
Onna rhea Quizo, Ian Gue, Kyra Aguilar, Hanz Vallehermoza, Earnest Hope Tinambacan, Dave Trasmonte, Von Cathlene Panot,Carla Mongado,Arnold Munez. aka Bassunni,Carla Mongado and Jerry Catarata

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[Press Release] End Hunger in the Philippines, adopt a Right to Adequate Food Framework Law -FIAN

End Hunger in the Philippines, adopt a Right to Adequate Food Framework Law

Quezon City -Super Typhoon Yolanda (also known by its international name as ‘Haiyan’) has caused unprecedented devastation in the Philippines.

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“It is therefore necessary for the Philippine Government to consider climate change from a human rights-based perspective, and, in the process, to align its climate policies, with the right to adequate food. Climate change-induced super typhoons and other similar events, compromise food production and supply, and interfere with the enjoyment of the right to adequate food”, the National Food Coalition said in a statement.

The NFC, a group calling for the adoption of a right to adequate food framework law in the Philippines, has also expressed solidarity with the victims of the typhoon. “We express our deepest sympathies for those who have lost relatives and friends. We likewise express our heartfelt gratitude to the local and global community, which have provided humanitarian aid, accompanied by words of encouragement in our time of need. This has given us much reason to hope. Everyday, with the ongoing search and rescue operations, as we sift through the debris, and the death toll mounts, we realize more and more the extent to which we are subject to Mother Nature’s power, and being at the mercy of her fury.”

The NFC is composed of over 50 organizations and federations with more than 10,000 members from the urban poor, peasants, indigenous peoples, fisherfolk and the middle class. The NFC has highlighted the main drivers of hunger in the country like poverty, inequality and the resulting failure of the poor to access available resources.

“We appreciate the Philippine Government’s ongoing disaster and relief efforts. Certainly, fulfilling the right to adequate food of those affected is central to these efforts. Super Typhoon Yolanda has interrupted the people’s enjoyment of this basic human right, taking its toll especially on the most vulnerable in our midst,” the NFC statement.

But the group also stressed that “the time for the Philippine Government to act could have been sooner. For the Philippine Government, disaster risk reduction is essential. It includes protecting people’s livelihoods from shocks, and strengthening their capacity to recover from disasters, such as super typhoons.”

“Concrete and meaningful steps must be taken early on to prevent a crisis from happening, or at least, to mitigate its effects, to save precious life. There is an urgent need for the Philippine Government, in embarking on disaster risk reduction, and in considering climate change from a human rights-based perspective, to ensure the right to adequate food. This is the right of the people to have regular, permanent and unrestricted access, either directly or through purchases, to quantitatively and qualitatively adequate and sufficient food, which corresponds to their cultural traditions, and which ensures a physically and mentally, individually and collectively, fulfilling and dignified life that
is free of fear” said Aurea Miclat-Teves NFC Convenor.

“Clear and comprehensive polices that promote the right to adequate food are urgently needed. In this context, we reiterate our call for the immediate adoption in the Philippines of a right to adequate food framework law”, the NFC statement added.

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[Petition] The Medical City: Please give back by setting up one mobile hospital in any of the provinces hit by super Typhoon Yolanda -change.org

Pinepetisyon si Administrator
The Medical City: Please give back by setting up one mobile hospital in any of the provinces hit by super Typhoon Yolanda

Petisyon ni Pia Maria Magalona
Antipolo City, Philippines

Many survivors of super typhoon Yolanda are in need of immediate medical care but they have nowhere to go. Almost all hospitals and health centers in the provinces hit by the super typhoon are no longer functional, some of them were even flattened. Local medical and health professionals and medicines are even more scarce than food and water.

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The Department of Health has set up its own medical tents, but their resources and people are too scarce and scattered; they can barely keep up with this massive scale of devastation Yolanda left on our people.

We are calling on The Medical City to set up at least one mobile hospital to any of the super typhoon-hit provinces. And we ask that these hospitals keep these facilities ready for deployment every time disasters strike the country. This is the perfect time for one of the top 5 hospitals in the Philippines to GIVE BACK to society in terms of resources and expertise.

For every day that survivors are not given medical attention, they are becoming more and more vulnerable and at risk of death. And this human catastrophe may become bigger than what we’re seeing in the news.

A mobile hospital in each province can help thousands of survivors who are in need of emergency care or surgery. Instead of patients being airlifted to Manila, why not just bring the hospitals to them? Hundreds of lives may be saved and it could help preempt an outbreak of diseases and infections.

Sign petition @www.change.org

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[Photoblog] Magtulungan tayong harapin ang pinsalang iniwan ni #Yolanda, manalangin at kumilos

The following photos are compiled and posted by Bro. Martin Francisco in his facebook account.

“…lahat ng pics dito (his FB) e mula ito sa ibat-ibang sources na hindi ko nagawang alamin dahil sa kagustuhang mas maipaabot agad sa marami ang kalagayan ng ating mga kababayang napinsala. We have to thank yung maraming unknown owner ng mga pics na ito.” -Bro. Martin Francisco.

Ilalathala po natin ang mga larawan sa layuning makatulong sa pagpapaabot ng impormasyon ng kalagayan ng ating mga kababayang sinalanta ng supertyphoon #Yolanda sa ating mga mambabasa.  Hindi po inaari ng HRonlinePH.com at maging ni Bro. Martin Francisco ang mga larawang ito.  Maraming salamat sa mga “unknown sources/owners”.

Maari ring matagpuan ang iba pang larawan sa FB ni Bro. Martin Francisco https://www.facebook.com/bromartin.francisco

Magtulungan tayong harapin ang Yolanda with prayer

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[Appeal] An urgent demand from a Filipina especially in the light of the recent devastation caused by Yolanda

An urgent demand from a Filipina especially in the light of the recent devastation caused by Yolanda.

An Open Letter to the US and the EU Countries on Climate Justice and the Need for Drastic Emissions Cut:

June 2013

In my country, the Philippines,December marks the onset of rainy season—a welcome departure from the torrid tropical heat of summer and high time for crop production, colder breezes during morning commutes, and indulgent frolics under the rain. That was not the case four years ago as this season unexpectedly brought about the tropical cyclone Ketsana, which devastated my country to an unprecedented state of calamity. This incident took 500 lives, displaced thousands from their homes, submerged upscale and poor communities in mud, and endangered the health of tens of thousands.

The following years were far less promising as the country was successively distraught with uncommonly powerful and destructive typhoons such as Typhoon Bopha in 2010, Tropical Storm Washi in 2011, and the seasonal southwest monsoon (locally known as Habagat) in August 2012. For the past four years, every rainy season produced stronger calamities, which consequently led to weeklong suspension of classes, slippery and damaged roads, and greater exposure to health risks. Not surprisingly, in 2013, the GermanWatch Climate Risk Index identified the Philippines as the fourth most vulnerable country to the damaging effects of climate change.

I am Alenz Avril De Torres and I am a Filipino student. I am writing because it is yet again June and I am haunted with the realization that this year and for the coming years, every rainy season will no longer be a pleasant favorite but rather a potentially irreversible nightmare.

The root of climate change and the solution to it is right in front of our faces that it baffles me why you remain unfazed with the adverse consequences of unabated emission of greenhouse gases (GHG). It has been scientifically proven that industrialized countries, comprising mostly of your countries, are the main source GHG over the last century yet poor and developing countries like my country absorb the backlash of your emissions. This unusual accumulation of emissions in the atmosphere has produced global increase in temperature, resulting in erratic and abnormal weather that occurs frequently in third world countries such as the Philippines, which contribute less than 1% to global GHG emission. The obvious and logical solution is to radically cut down GHG emissions and repair countries damaged, and continuously damaged, by the accelerating changes in climate. Simply put, cut and be just.

Just last month, scientific agencies revealed that the carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere have already reached 400 parts per million (ppm), the highest level in human history and 50 ppm higher than the amount our atmosphere can safely absorb. If this will be the state of affairs in the next decade, then humanity is bound to perish. Thus, we call on you to be responsible and accountable for your historical contribution to Earth’s damage. A first, albeit huge, step that you should take is to ratify and adhere to the second commitment period for 2013 to 2020 of the Kyoto Protocol and to divest from band-aid and gibberish solutions such as Clean Development Mechanisms (CDMs) and Reducing Emission from Deforestation and Forest Degradations (REDDs). If we are to stabilize the Earth’s temperature to a threshold of until 1.5 degrees Celsius, a goal set by climate scientists and supported by 112 countries, then there should be no space for your “flexibility” mechanism mumbo jumbos, where carbon credits are traded and bought. Each and every country must play their role for the reversal of climate change and to make the Earth a livable place for all, and your role is to cut GHG emissions.

Most of all, we call on you to be just. We are undoubtedly prejudiced by the socio-political and economic adjustments demanded of us to be able to adapt to climate changes given the minute amount of GHG emissions we have contributed. I think that it is cogent for us to demand that you, wealthy countries, pay your climate debt, and pay reparation to poor countries. As nationals from the Global South, we demand that you no longer put off owning up to your responsibility to take lead in solving the climate problem. We cannot, and most importantly, should not bear the brunt of climate change alone; reduced to being dispensable and second-class citizens of the Earth.

Amid the gloom from looming rain clouds, numerous climate justice campaigns will be launched this month in the Philippines. I hope that in these efforts to raise the issue of climate justice within the discourse of global democracy, you show cooperation and finally share the same activism with us. I invite you to completely leave self-serving interests and to join us in our defense of climate justice and promotion of a livable and sustainable Earth. I know that there are always reasons for hope and none for defeatism. I am optimistic that every June may still be the onset of a beautiful rainy season.

Always hopeful,

A young Filipina

by PMCJ https://www.facebook.com/ClimateJusticePH

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

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[In the news] DSWD to prioritize housing units for ‘Sendong’ victims – PhilStar.com

DSWD to prioritize housing units for ‘Sendong’ victims
By Evelyn Macairan, The Philippine Star
January 08, 2012
 MANILA, Philippines – The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) yesterday said they would prioritize families with children, pregnant women or with those with sick members in the housing program for victims of tropical storm “Sendong.”

In a statement, Social Welfare Secretary Corazon Soliman said that priority would be given to families with small children, pregnant and lactating mothers; surrogate parents of orphaned children living in evacuation centers and damaged houses; families whose houses were damaged and whose heads of household died or were incapacitated as a result of the disaster, and families with members who are seriously ill or with special needs.

Under the program, the beneficiaries will be provided with structurally strong shelters constructed in the relocation site. These houses can withstand wind with a velocity of up to 220 kilometers per hour and an intensity four earthquake.

Social workers from the local governments validated the beneficiaries for the core shelter program.

In Cagayan de Oro, eight temporary relocation sites for typhoon victims have been set up. These are located in Calaanan, Lumbia, Agusan Elementary School, Mandumol basketball court, Buena Oro covered court, Camaman-an Covered Court, Fatima Parish Hall and Mt. Carmel Church.

Two permanent relocation sites were also set up in 9.5 hectares of land in Calaanan and five hectares in Lumbia.

In Iligan City, three permanent relocation sites were identified. These are in eight hectares of the property of the National Steel Corporation, three hectares in Sta. Filomena, 14.4 hectares in Sta. Elena.

A temporary relocation site was put up in the Integrated Bus Terminal in Barangay Tambo.

Read full article @ www.philstar.com

[In the news] Farmers press for NFA rice allocation – www.manilatimes.net

Farmers press for NFA rice allocation
Written by Raadee S. Sausa

MALOLOS CITY: A federation of farmers’ cooperative in Central Luzon is appealing to the National Food Administration (NFA) to implement its 2011 Institutionalized Farmers as Distributors (IFAD) program on Thursday.
Simeon Sioson, Federation of Central Luzon Farmers Cooperatives chair said that the damages brought by the recent Typhoons Pedring and Quiel have brought untold miseries to their economic lives.

With the damages brought by the two recent typhoons to farm lands, Sioson said their group believes that the current month of December and January are already considered as rice lean months.

Rice traders in Intercity Industrial subdivision in Bocaue, a major rice trading center of the country, have confirmed that commercial trading of locally harvested palay this wet harvest season that are to be milled into rice have drastically decreased compared to previous years, Sioson said.

Commercial prices of palay in Intercity depending on its quality were monitored to range from P15 to P16.50 per kilo for flood affected palay, way above the P7, P9 and P11 buying price of the NFA while commercial prices for Class A palay were monitored to range from P18-P19.50 per kilo, also way above the P17.50 buying price of NFA.

The price range of commercial palay only shows that there are only small stocks of commodities to be traded and that government intervention is needed to prevent prices of the staple crop to increase particularly this Christmas time, Sioson noted.

Read full article @ www.manilatimes.net

[Appeal] Appeal for support for the typhoon victims in Ifugao

Appeal for support for the typhoon victims in Ifugao

Dear CGIP Friends,

We would also like to appeal for any help you can extend to our kababayans who were affected by the recent typhoons. Here are the updates as of 10 am today: affected barangays-110, families – 2,195, Persons – 10,430 (M- 5,130 and F-5,300). totally damaged houses – 139. partially damaged houses- 2,120. 4 dead and 21 injured. there are now 7 evacuation centers (located in Banaue, Lamut and Hungduan). majority of the roads are still impassable due to landslides and collapsed bridges. Food, medicines, fuel and basic necessities are very much needed.  We have drop off sites for donations in kind which are as follows:

Manila: office of the Phil. Assoc. for Intercultural Development (PAFID) at 71 Malakas Street, Central District, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines, 1101. Tel. (632) 927-4580; (632) 928-6267. Please look for Ms. Marge or Jay-R.

**collection of donations will be until Sunday, Oct 9

Baguio: Human Resource Development Office, UP Baguio, Governor Pack Road, Baguio City. Kindly look for Ma’am Maan Diaz.

**collection of donations will be until Saturday, Oct. 8

Thanks to PAFID and UP Baguio for joining us in this initiative.

Cordillera Conservation Trust (CCT) is also temporarily converting their GCash Donor account into a Relief Donation venue for Ifugao. Text: DONATE (amount) MPIN CORDI and send to 2882.

For other cash donations, we will be sending the details by tomorrow at the latest.

Thanks and we’ll keep you posted.

From: Robeliza Halip [robieleeza@gmail.com]