Tag Archives: internet freedom

[Statement] RA 10175 is an Anti-Cybercrime Law that criminalizes internet freedom an assault to human rights! -HRonlinePH.com

RA 10175 is an Anti-Cybercrime Law that criminalizes internet freedom an assault to human rights!

Human Rights Online Philippines (HRonlinePH.com), a group of human rights defenders online, stands against the present state of the Anti-Cyber Crime Law and we demand that such law must be consistent with human rights standards and perpetrators behind this spiteful law be held accountable.

RA 10175 or Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012 is a State crime and an assault against the human rights of the people. HRonlinePH.com is one with the Filipino netizens in condemning its intention to deliberately go against our right to defend human rights online.

Under the law, activists and human rights defenders will be the obvious and primary target of attacks by guilty politicians and government officials. The intentional inclusion/insertion of treacherous provisions poses great danger to defenders utilizing the internet in its work to promote, defend and assert human rights against violators from the government.

The law is an obvious assault to many of the peoples’ rights both activists and ordinary citizens like free speech, freedom of expression, due process and among others. It is inconsistent with government’s obligation to respect, protect and fulfill human rights as provided in the Bill of Rights under the Philippine constitution and international Bill of Rights.

The law is also a blatant breach of the Government’s obligation and commitment to the United Nation International Covenant on Civil Political Rights (ICCPR) which states that;

Article 19
1. Everyone shall have the right to hold opinions without interference.
2. Everyone shall have the right to freedom of expression; this right shall include freedom to seek, receive and impart information and ideas of all kinds, regardless of frontiers, either orally, in writing or in print, in the form of art, or through any other media of his choice.

Certainly we need a law that would protect the people from cyber criminals and it’s our elected officials’ obligation to provide us one. But we cannot allow a law that would be used to suppress any of our democratic rights and freedom may it be on the internet or on the grounds. We must not allow any law that violates standards and protection of our rights.

We challenge and demand that PNoy government fulfill its duty and obligation to protect us. Protect the people from cyber criminals and from any form of attacks of human rights violators from the government.

We reiterate and assert that it is our right to defend human rights offline and online and any law that would violate these rights must be junked and perpetrator must be held accountable!

It is obviously the intention of the malicious provisions of the law for guilty politicians to protect themselves by depriving the people of venues for airing demands and remedy for their issues.

It is not a crime to criticize government inaction and irresponsibility, it is our right!
It is not a crime to expose government violations, it is our right!
It is not a crime to assert and defend our rights, it is our right!
But it is a CRIME by the Government to violate our internet freedom because it is our human rights!

 

[From the web] An appeal to the SC to stop Cybercrime law by Ellen Tordesillas

An appeal to the SC to stop Cybercrime law
by Ellen Tordesillas

October 1, 2012

Last Friday, I joined five other persons in asking the Supreme Court to issue a temporary restraining order against the implementation of Republic Act 10175 or the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012.

We asked the High Court to declare Sections 4 (c) [4], 5, 6, 7 and 19 of the Act unconstitutional.

My fellow petitioners are Davao-based radio broadcaster radio broadcaster Alexander Adonis, my VERA Files colleague Ma. Gisela Ordenes-Cascolan, lawyers/bloggers Harry Roque, Romel Bagares, and Gilbert Andres, legal officer of Media Defense Southeast Asia.

Named respondents because they are the ones who will be implementing the law which President Aquino signed last Sept. 12 and took effect Sept. 27 are: Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa Jr., Budget Secretary Florencio Abad, Justice Secretary Leila de Lima, Interior Secretary Manuel Roxas III, National Bureau of Investigation director Nonnatus Caesar Rojas, Philippine National Police chief Nicanor Bartolome, and acting Director-General Denis Villorente of the Information and Communications Technology Office-Department of Science and Technology.

Our primary argument against the law is that it is in violation of the Constitution which states that “No law shall be passed abridging the freedom of speech, of expression, or of the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and petition the government for redress of grievances.”

Read full article @ www.ellentordesillas.com

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[Petition] Call for Petitioners- repealing of the CyberCrime Law (RA 10175) – PIFA

Call for Petitioners

Philippine Internet Freedom Alliance (PIFA) is for the eventual repealing of the CyberCrime Law (RA 10175). One of the strategies we are going to embark on is to file a TRO this coming October 4, 2012. We need to know who (as individual) and what groups want to support the petition given the outline of the petition below:

I. The Law is an unreasonable search and seizure

a. The Law violates the right to privacy.

b. The Law violates the right to privacy of communications.

c. The Law does not meet narrowing tailoring standard for legislation that infringes fundamental rights.

d. The Law creates data harvesting/data mining. Surveillance.

II. The Law violates equal protection. No substantial distinction.

a. Does not distinguish between legitimate and illegitimate use. The Law penalizes legitimate use. (The Law is void for vagueness. It fails overbreadth.)

b. The Law operates as an ex post facto law.

c. The Law does not meet narrow tailoring standard for legislation that infringes fundamental rights.

III. The Law violates the right to free speech.

a. The Law is contrary to Public International Law.

b. Balanced flow of information right.

IV. The Law will clog the dockets and jail.

For individual petitioners, we need you to submit your name, age, address, citizenship and TELCOS (subscription to the internet and description of how are you affected by the law (e.g. because you’re a netizen, blogger, freelance writer; how much you will be affected by the law in your usage of the net for your work in narrative form). Draft petition will be available for your reading and review on October 2 evening before midnight.

For organizational petitioners, your group needs to be SEC-registered. Submit to us your name and TELCOS (how much your business/advocacy will be affected by the law in narrative form).

SUBMISSION OF NAMES/ORGS FOR THE PETITION IS ON OCT 1 (MON) UNTIL 7PM. PLEASE EMAIL TO joftivillena@gmail.com or the form below

THE ACTUAL SIGNING PERIOD IS ON OCT 3 (Wed), 5-10 PM at 11 Matimpiin St., bgy. Pinyahan, Q.C. Look for Jofti. YOU MAY ALSO BRING YOUR FUND DONATIONS TOO.

During the actual signing, the individual petitioners need to bring 25 photocopies of your Internet bill and payment receipt most recent (e.g. wi-tribe, DSL, etc.) and 25 photocopies of one government-issued ID (e.g. passport, SSS, etc.).

For organizations, please bring 25 photocopies of your Corporate Secretary’s Certificate which shows the organization’s board resolution authorizing you to sign/file the petition.

Make sure you are physically present on October 3 to sign up.

Sign petition @ https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?fromEmail=true&formkey=dE9UbVFHYkVLUGIydXpSZ0lWbXdUUUE6MQ

We are the Philippine Internet Freedom Alliance or PIFA (formerly known as Filipino Internet Freedom Alliance of FIFA — we’re keeping both names), a broad coalition of individuals and organizations seeking to amend / remove the provisions which threaten Internet Freedom in Republic Act No. 10175 or the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012. In the long-term, it aims to be the bastion of this freedom.

On October 2, 2012, Tuesday, 10am we will troop to the Supreme Court to let the 3 branches of our government know how we feel about the Cybercrime Prevention Act in its current form. Let’s use the power of social media to spread the word. Long live Internet Freedom!!!

Or connect with PIFA @  https://www.facebook.com/groups/319291631503416/

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[Solidarity] Internet Black Out Day campaign on August 14 by Malaysian NGOs for internet freedom – Forum Asia

Dear friends,

The amendments to the Evidence Act in Malaysia hold all internet users liable for content appearing in their blogs and websites and shift the burden of proof to the owner of the blogs and websites. This severely impacts internet freedom, freedom of expression and the right to be presumed innocent before proven guilty. Now, there is a Internet Black Out Day campaign on August 14 by Malaysian NGOs, including FORUM-ASIA’s member, SUARAM against the Evidence Act and to call for the withdrawal of the amendments.

Please support this campaign in whatever way you can. The campaign is led by Center for Independent Journalists (CIJ) at http://cijmalaysia.org/2012/08/07/cij-to-launch-internet-blackout-day-on-14-august/
For more information about the Internet Blackout Day and to take part in the campaign, please visit:

1. The official blog at stop114a.wordpress.com

2. The Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/evidenceamendmentact.

3. Stop 114A’s Twibbon page for Twitter: http://twibbon.com/join/Stop-114A

4. Stop 114A’s Twibbon page for Facebook: http://twibbon.com/cause/Stop-114A/facebook

For additional information, please contact CIJ via e-mail at cijmalaysia@gmail.com or call us at 03-4023 0772.

in solidarity,

Yap

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

PH 2nd deadliest country for journalists – CPJ -RAPPLER.com

PH 2nd deadliest country for journalists – CPJ.

PH 2nd deadliest country for journalists – CPJ
by KD Suarez, rappler.com
February 21, 2012

MANILA, Philippines – With at least 72 journalists killed since 1992, the Philippines is the 2nd deadliest country for journalists in 2011, international organization Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) said in its annual report.

The 2011 CPJ ranking was due to the “persistent violence” that journalists, particularly those working in the provinces, face as they do their work, the annual “Attacks on the Press” report said.

The country also ranks 3rd in the Impunity Index, a ranking of countries based on unsolved cases of journalist murders.

Iraq still tops the 2011 list, with 151 unsolved cases as of that year. The Philippines is followed by Algeria (60 cases), Russia (53), Colombia (43), Pakistan (41), Somalia (36), India (27), Mexico (27), and Afghanistan (24).

“Despite high levels of press and Internet freedom, provincial journalists worked under constant threat of reprisal,” the report, released Tuesday, February 21, said.

It cited the murders of journalists Gerry Ortega and Romeo Olea, who were both shot and killed for their reporting in the past year. Both cases are still unsolved.

Read full article @ www.rappler.com

[From the web] Join Our Censorship Protest!

Join Our Censorship Protest!.

by Jane Wells

 Have you been paying attention to all the hubbub online about the proposed U.S. legislation (SOPA/PIPA) that threatens internet freedom? I wrote about it last week over on WordPress.org, but the gist is this: there’s a bill in the U.S. Senate that if passed would put publishing freedom severely at risk, and could shut down entire sites at the whim of media companies. Fight for the Future created this nifty video to sum it up better than I can.

On January 18, 2012, sites all over the internet will be blacking out to protest and try to mobilize more people to speak out against this bill coming up in the Senate next week — S. 968: the Protect IP Act (PIPA) — in an attempt to let U.S. lawmakers know how much opposition there is. WordPress.org, Wikipedia, and even WordPress.com VIP I Can Has Cheezburger? will be participating in the blackout to raise awareness and spur you to action.

Here on WordPress.com, we want to participate as well. Freshly Pressed will be blacked out during the strike.

Read full article @ http://en.blog.wordpress.com/2012/01/18/join-our-censorship-protest/

[Statement] Stand for Human Rights, Defend Internet Freedom! – DAKILA

Stand for Human Rights, Defend Internet Freedom!
by DAKILA

January 19, 2012

 We cannot deny the power internet has brought upon every individual – suddenly we all have a say; suddenly we can influence many; suddenly, earning knowledge is a click away. As Dakila pointed out in its Digital Activism Program, the extensive reach of social media and digital applications have facilitated the spread of social advocacies by exponential numbers in ways we have never imagined before.

Civil society has no doubt been empowered through the internet. We see this evidently in the latest uprisings and revolutions that have been happening around the world. And the internet has been instrumental in communication and knowledge sharing which has eventually lead to the success of many of these revolutions.

As an organization composed of artists, Dakila understands the need for a law to stop piracy and copyright infringement and to protect intellectual property rights but not at the expense of free speech and integrity of the internet. Simply put, the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA) are poorly constructed bills that threaten free speech on the internet more than it protects intellectual property rights.

Although SOPA and PIPA are American legislations, its effects will not stop at American borders. The internet is a global village, where physical geographical borders are blurred and where people share information and knowledge among each other regardless of geographical location. With SOPA and PIPA, information and knowledge sharing not only threatens America, but threatens the world as a whole.

Dakila opposes SOPA and PIPA. The internet has been one of the keys to the democratization of several countries, has helped the fight of the 99%, has aided in bringing human rights violations to light. Now more than ever we see its importance in the role to uphold human rights and people’s dignity. The internet, an activist’s tool for revolution and social change, should not be bound by laws that harm more than they benefit.

We have been more empowered and have done things which, ten years ago, we would not have thought we were capable of doing. Let’s us not let an ill-conceived bill take these away from us.

Dakila – Philippine Collective for Modern Heroism
19 January 2012

https://www.facebook.com/notes/dakila/stand-for-human-rights-defend-internet-freedom/10150541261749344

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