Tag Archives: children and violence

[People] Torture and Abuse of Children in Jails | by Fr. Shay Cullen

#HumanRights #Torture #Children

Torture and Abuse of Children in Jails
Shay Cullen
24 September 2021

The unpleasant truths about the torture and abuse of children behind bars are the truths that may not set us free from guilt, apathy, and indifference. It is not only in the Philippines’ Bahay Pag-Asa, youth detention jails, that children and youth are maltreated and abused in detention but also in many countries. Treating youth as criminals has a life-long traumatic impact on them. One thing for sure is the loss of trust and respect for the adult world of authority that allows them to be abused. As the saying goes, “Abuse a child and you make an enemy.”

In Cambodia, last June, Kak Sovann Chhay, an autistic 16-year old Cambodian teenager following the human rights activism of his jailed father, was jailed. Kak Sovann Chhay sent a message on Telegram to government supporters that were considered insulting to government officials. The police broke into his house without a warrant. He was handcuffed, arrested, beaten and jailed in the adult jail of the Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh. His mother is not allowed to visit him. A lawyer has and reports squalid conditions not fit for an animal. UN officials have been alerted and expressed urgent concern for violations of his human rights. He is facing two years in jail in the notorious sub-human conditions of a Cambodian prison. https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-58588022

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[Event] The Anti-Terror Act of 2020 and its impact on children -UATC

#HumanRights #Children UATC LIVESTREAM DISCUSSION/ WEBINAR
In celebration of the National Children’s Month 2020

“The Anti-Terror Act of 2020 and its impact on children”
November 26, 2020 (Thursday)
4PM to 6PM

DISCUSSANTS:
The Anti-Terror Act of 2020: Background and Salient Features
Atty. Gian Arabejo, Alternative Law Groups (ALG)

Impact of the Anti-Terror Act to Children
Atty. Pamela Camacho, Children’s Legal Rights and Development Center (CLRDC)

Impact to Human Rights Work
Ernesto Anasarias, BALAY Rehabilitation Center

Updates on the Supreme Court Petition
Atty. Tin Sevilla, PAHRA/ OMCT

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[Right-Up] BATANG BILANGGO, EDAD SIYAM? -ni Greg Bituin Jr.

BATANG BILANGGO, EDAD SIYAM?

tama bang sa edad siyam, ang bata na’y mapiit?
hustisya na ba sa bansa’y ganito na kalupit?
sa murang gulang, karapatan niya’y pinagkait
kinulong dahil sindikato sa kanya’y gumamit

batang edad siyam ay dapat na raw maikulong
panukalang ito sa Kongreso’y isinusulong
pag bata’y gumawa ng krimen at agad sinuplong
kulong agad habang laya ang nag-atas na buhong!

ano nang nangyari sa ating mga mambabatas?
krimen ba’y di na kaya ng kapulisang malutas?
di na mapigil ng maykapangyarihan ang dahas?
mga sakit ba ng lipunan ay wala nang lunas?

mga magulang ba ng batang bilanggo’y pabaya?
bakit magulang ay kayod ng kayod ngunit dukha?
mga bata ba’y inabandona na’t isinumpa?
o problema’y ang sistemang nagdulot ng dalita?

bakit nais makulong ang bata, ano ang sanhi?
halina’t pag-isipan, patuloy tayong magsuri
dulot kaya ito ng pagkakaiba sa uri?
o baka mambabatas ay hungkag ang mga budhi?

– gregbituinjr.

Follow Greg sa Fb (Mga tula’t akda ni Gregorio V. Bituin Jr.)

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[In the news] LOOK: Child rights groups stage protest at Senate to oppose lowering MACR -INQUIRER.net

LOOK: Child rights groups stage protest at Senate to oppose lowering MACR

Different child rights groups have staged a protest outside the Senate complex on Monday to oppose the proposed law that would lower the minimum age of criminal responsibility (MACR) for minors.

Groups such as the Salinlahi Alliance for Children’s Concerns, Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA), In Defense of Human Rights and Dignity Movement (iDefend), the Missionary Benedictine Sisters of the Manila Priory and the Academic Community of St. Scholastica’s College and other organizations flocked to the gates of the Senate complex as they urged lawmakers to halt the lowering of the MACR.

Read full article @newsinfo.inquirer.net

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[Statement] IDEALS, Inc.’s Statement on the Lowering of the Minimum Age of Criminal Responsibility

IDEALS, Inc.’s Statement on the Lowering of the Minimum Age of Criminal Responsibility

This administration is failing an entire generation of Filipino children. Thousands are already orphaned from the bloody anti-drug campaign. Now, under a proposed legislation, they will be jailed and tried as hardened criminals.

On January 28, Congress passed on third and final reading House Bill 8858, which lowers the minimum age of criminal responsibility (MACR) from 15 to 12 years old. In an effort to soften public backlash against it, the bill “raised” its initial proposal of setting the age to merely nine years old, and reworded “criminal responsibility” to “social responsibility.” This, however, is just a ruse to sugarcoat the cruel backwardness catalyzed by the Duterte administration.

Based on data from the Philippine National Police (PNP), only 1.72% of total crimes are committed by children and youths. Majority are petty crimes such as theft of cash and food items— crimes that are often rooted into deeper social and economic issues.

We decry the halting of young lives by a criminal justice system that will be made even more cruel if such a legislation is enacted, especially when convicted politicians enjoy their liberties and run free. Passing this bill will effectively whip scapegoats instead of cracking down on the big fish that manipulate the children, further promoting marginalization among the people.

IDEALS Inc. is one with the broad alliance of child rights advocates in fiercely condemning the lowering of the MACR to 12 years old. Article 40 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child clearly states that children in conflict with the law must be treated “in a manner consistent with the promotion of the child’s sense of dignity and worth… and which takes into account the child’s age and the desirability of promoting the child’s reintegration” in society.

We challenge the Duterte Administration to stop making criminals out of its citizens and abandon its fixation on punitive justice and dangerous shortcuts. The State is duty-bound ‘to ensure that children grow up in a safe environment protected from crime and violence,” not rob them of their lives and the opportunity to reintegrate and become future contributors to the development of society.

#JailNoChild #ChildrenNotCriminals #Not12Not9
Sign this petition to show your support: bit.ly/childrennotcriminals

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[In the news] Karen Gallman: 12 ‘still too young’ as minimum age of criminal liability -RAPPLER.com

Karen Gallman: 12 ‘still too young’ as minimum age of criminal liability

Miss Intercontinental 2018 Karen Gallman started her media blitz this week after winning the country’s first ever title in the pageant. The questions weren’t easy – she was asked her view on a number of hot issues in the Philippines.

In an interview with Karen Davila on ANC Wednesday, January 30, the 26-year-old Filipino-Australian titleholder said she didn’t agree with legislation that would lower the minimum age of criminal liability to 12 years old. The House of Representatives recently passed the measure on final reading. The Senate may soon pass a similar measure.

Karen also said she doesn’t see anything wrong with marijuana for medical use.

“I think there’s a few benefits to marijuana if it’s used health wise. But then for me, I think it’s such a bad habit if you’re just smoking it for the sake of smoking it.

“For medical purposes, then yes. But to be available to anyone just for the sake of smoking it, I don’t think it’s a good idea,” she said. The House of Representatives also recently passed a medical marijuana bill.

Read full article @www.rappler.com

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[In the news] Doctors unite to oppose bill lowering age of criminal liability -GMAnews

Doctors unite to oppose bill lowering age of criminal liability

The country’s leading alliances of pediatricians, child psychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, and medical specialists have united to express their strong opposition to the bill seeking to lower the minimum age of criminal responsibility.

Before the press on Thursday, the following medical organizations declared they are backing child rights advocates in the fight against House Bill 8858, which would lower the minimum age of criminal responsibility from 15 years old to 12:

 

  • Philippine Pediatric Society
  • Child Neurology Society Philippines
  • Philippine Society for Development and Behavioral Pediatrics
  • Philippine Society of Adolescent Medicine Specialists
  • Philippine Psychiatric Association
  • Philippine Society for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
  • Child Protection Network
  • Child Rights Network of the Philippines
  • Philippine Medical Association

Read full article @www.gmanetwork.com

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[Statement] Duterte’s MACR not about children, but Dictatorship -iDefend

Duterte’s MACR not about children, but Dictatorship

Legislators aim to lower the minimum age of criminal responsibility (MACR) to below fifteen (15) years old in such a rushed manner, seemingly ignoring all scientific evidence and expert warnings, as if the country is being run down by children rampaging in the streets causing public mayhem and mass pandemonium. Neither the House of Representatives nor the Senate provide evidence that lowering the MACR will substantially contribute to solving criminality or drug trafficking.

But before they were children in conflict with the law (CICL) they were children living in poverty (CLIP), vulnerable to abuse, neglect and exploitation. Many of them have become the President’s “collateral damage” in his anti-drug operations; thousands have witnessed extreme violence, became traumatized orphans bereft of adult supervision and social guidance. They will never trust the government again.

In lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility, our children are sacrificed as an excuse for lousy law enforcement, inept crime prevention and failed development policies. Instead of enacting national protective and rehabilitation mechanisms for poor minors affected by the multiple impact of deepening poverty, organized crime and extrajudicial killings, government wants to punish them for these social maladies.

This is typical of government’s quick-fix, trigger-happy, corruption-bred policies that are solely focused on terrorizing the population in the guise of addressing crime. House Bill 8858 is not about protecting children, but a political deal between House Speaker GMA and President Duterte that must be accomplished before the election period starts.

Lowering the MACR is yet another brick laid in the foundation of Duterte’s authoritarian project. It is railroaded on the people while extrajudicial killings continue to victimize drug suspects, political critics, peace activists and human rights defenders. It is pushed to demonstrate Duterte’s drive for dictatorship. And dictatorship must be established if Duterte’s cronies and allies are to continue to dominate and profit from the country’s political and economic life with impunity.

Thus resisting dictatorship is to resist the lowering of the MACR, and all other proposed “death bills” that Congress enact which have nothing to do with crime prevention, national reconciliation, poverty alleviation, peace and security or social justice.

[People] Children are Treated as Criminals

Children are Treated as Criminals
Fr. Shay Cullen
25 January 2019

The lower chamber of the Philippine Congress is going to approve the lowering of the minimum age of criminal liability of a child from the present 15 years-of-age to 12-years-of-age. They really want to reduce it to 9 but public outcry forced the politicians to change. Yet, 12 year old is too young to impute criminal liability. What knowledge and discernment do uneducated, impoverished hungry street children at 12 years old know and understand?

The Juvenile Justice and Welfare Act is a good law if it were to be implemented. But it is not. Out of more than a hundred highly-urbanized cities and provinces that are supposed to build homes for the children, only 40 have done it. Unfortunately, some of these supposedly homes for children called Bahay Pag-asa are in reality jails for children where thousands now languish hungry, underfed and abused.

At present, these are cruel detention centers where the children are mostly treated as criminals held for weeks and months behind steel bars. Practically no activities, exercise, entertainment or education is provided in most places. Many of the children suffer bullying, sexual and physical abuse by the older detainees. If the minimum age of criminal liability is lowered to nine or 12, even more will be added to these numbers.

This we know since our work at the Preda Foundation for the past 45 years has been to rescue them and give them a happy home in an open center without guards, gates or fences .We give the freedom of choice to decide to stay and get educated and 95 percent choose to stay. They are not criminals in the power of criminal syndicates as congress people assert.

This is the present reality of child detention centers with only a few encouraging exceptions. Thousands of small children are in fact behind bars in sub-human conditions, their rights violated day and night. It is a horrific disgrace for the proud Filipino people.
(See https://www.dropbox.com/sh/5jvt2o2y7pc06le/AABUYknPy7PrjM2q0gZXu7ata?dl=0)

This law is not being implemented to this day. The small children, some as young as ten, are in fact locked up in these overcrowded cells in stinking, sub-human conditions. The Philippine Congress, in its lack of understanding and knowledge about this reality, will condemn many children as young as 12 to rot in jails where they will be sexually and physically abused. That will be on their conscience.

They should make it mandatory for each local government to build a real home for children under the direction of the Juvenile Justice and Welfare Council (JJWC) and to mandatorily fund its operation every year. Local governments must not put children behind bars. The congressmen and senators will not call child victims of these horrid cells to testify before them. They might hear the truth. They have never visited the child detention centers and they know nothing about human suffering.

These child detention centers have a small cell with a dozen teenagers and small children crammed inside in some of them. There is a dirty stinky toilet clogged with human waste. They sleep on the concrete floor in most of these child detention centers.

It is untrue and a wild fantasy of congress people to think the children will have recovery, therapy, values formation, medical care, education in nice children’s homes run by a caring, benevolent local government. It is the opposite: the children are treated as criminals and suffered hardship, hunger and are devastated as human beings that do not even have hope of anything better.

Millions of pesos have been provided to the Juvenile Justice Welfare Council established to oversee the implementation of the Republic Act 9344 or the Juvenile Justice and Welfare Act but much of the money has gone unused. Local mayors do not listen or follow the advice of the Council. The JJWC has no power to compel compliance with the law.

The local government officials are not interested in building a nice, clean well-managed home for abandoned children at risk or in dire circumstance or in conflict with the law. The politicians consider the ragged, hungry, homeless abused street children, not as children in need of help, but as vermin, pests, undeserving poor, throwaway creatures, useless and not even human. “They have criminal minds,” one top official said about street children.

If a nation is judged in its reputation as a moral upright dignified nation by the way it treats its poor and its neglected children, then the Philippines is getting a very low score if any at all. The national pride of the Philippine nation is absent when it comes to the plight of its neglected street children. National dignity is sullied and it is nowhere to be found.

The officials and politicians, all uncaring rich elite having never been deprived of anything, unjustly and wrongly call the thousands of hungry children criminals and accuse them of working for crime syndicates and drug delivery boys and girls. But there is no sound, proven information or evidence to back up that unrehearsed assertion and false accusation.

Child detention in the Philippines today is a horrific, unjust, undeserved punishment that is detrimental and destructive of the child. Look at the facts: Out of all recorded crimes, 98 percent are done by adults and only 2 percent by minors.

Out of all alleged wrongdoing done by minors themselves, only 2 percent are allegedly committed by children less than nine years of age. Children nine to 11 years of age are responsible for 7 percent of all wrongdoing by minors. Then minors 12 to 15 years of age are responsible for 43 percent of wrong doing by minors whereas youth 15 to 18 years of age are responsible for 48 percent of alleged wrong doing committed by minors.

It is clear that the 2 percent of crimes committed by minors is miniscule and does not deserve harsh treatment and punishment.

The children see that some of the rich politicians get away with massive crimes of plunder and wallow in putrid corruption creating poverty and homeless children. The children struggle to survive and eat one scant meal a day.

Preda Foundation was founded 45 years ago to help children at risk and in conflict with the law and those falsely accused and abused and jailed without evidence. The many children rescued have the given testimony of what they suffered. They were saved and started a new happier life at the Preda open center of freedom and dignity.

http://www.preda.org

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[Appeal] Open Letter to the Committee on Justice of Senate of the Philippines -OMCT

Open Letter to the Committee on Justice of Senate of the Philippines
Senate President: Senator Vicente C. Sotto III,

Via email: os_sotto@yahoo.com

Geneva, 24 January 2019

Re: Minimum age of criminal responsibility must not be lowered

Dear Senator Vicente C. Sotto III,

The World Organization Against Torture (OMCT), the leading global network of civil society organizations against torture, summary executions, enforced disappearances and all other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment in the world, is writing to express its grave concern about the approval by the House of Representatives of the Philippines on 23 January of the amendment of the current juvenile justice law, which aims at lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility from 15 to 12 years old.

International human rights bodies have repeatedly encouraged the Philippines to not lower the minimum age of criminal responsibility currently set at 15 years old. The United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child specifically urged the Philippines to “take all necessary measures to ensure that the age of criminal responsibility is not lowered”.[1] Commenting on the previous draft Bill No. 922, rejected early 2017, which sought to lower the minimum age of criminal responsibility to nine years, the United Nations Committee against Torture recommended that “the age of criminal responsibility be maintained at the age of 15 years.”[2]

There is ample evidence showing that early contact with the justice system and detention of children, especially young children, leads to serious and life-long negative impacts on their mental, emotional and physical health and development.

Lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility will not reduce crime. On the contrary, research show that children in contact with the law have a higher chance of further involvement with the justice system. In addition, it is often the most disadvantaged and vulnerable children who come in contact with the justice system at a very young age. For instance, in 2018, the monitoring of holding centers of Caloocan City by the OMCT and partners showed that around 20% of children are detained because they have been rescued from the street or abusive parents. Another 30% are accused of having only committed minor offences.[3]

The approval of the proposed bill would also worsen the seriously overcrowded detention facilities throughout the Philippines, conditions which frequently amount to torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment.[4]

During prison visits, the OMCT and its partners have documented several incidents of corporal punishment of children while being apprehended and detained. This included physical and verbal abuse by staff as well as solitary confinement in small windowless cells. Visits also revealed poor sanitary installations, lack of medical services, lack of food and inadequate recreational activities [5]

Accordingly, the World Organization Against Torture respectfully urges the Senate of the Philippines:

– To maintain the minimum age of criminal responsibility at 15 years old.

– To ensure that deprivation of liberty is only used as a measure of last resort, as recommended by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

– To “Expand the use of alternative measures to deprivation of liberty, such as diversion, probation and counselling and community services”, as recommended by the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child.

– To ensure that the fundamental rights of children in detention are respected in accordance with the United Nations Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

In the hope that the concerns expressed in this letter will receive the attention they deserve, we remain at your disposal for any further information.

Yours sincerely,
Gerald Staberock
Secretary General
OMCT

[1] CRC/C/PHL/CO/3-4.
[2] CAT/C/PHL/CO/3.
[3] OMCT, CLRDC and PAHRA’s Follow-up Report to the Concluding Observations of the Committee against Torture on the Philippines’ Third Periodic Report.
[4] According to official figures from the Commission of Audit the overcrowding of prisons has reached over 600 %.
[5] OMCT, CLRDC and PAHRA’s Follow-up Report to the Concluding Observations of the Committee against Torture on the Philippines’ Third Periodic Report.

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[In the news] Anne Curtis saddened by proposal to lower age of criminal liability -INQUIRER.net

Anne Curtis saddened by proposal to lower age of criminal liability

Actress Anne Curtis has expressed her stand on lowering the age of criminal liability from 15 to nine years old.

“Nakakalungkot isipan na ibaba nila ang criminal responsibility to the age of 9. At that age, they are still very much children,” Curtis wrote in a tweet on Tuesday.

This was a response to a tweet by United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) Philippines that read: “May batas na tayo para sa mga children in conflict with the law: ang Juvenile Justice & Welfare Act (RA 9344).”

“Ngunit hindi ito nabibigyan ng tamang pondo at suporta para sa tamang implementation nito sa buong bansa,” it added.

Read full article @entertainment.inquirer.net

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[In the news] Mga child advocate, NGO sa CDO, tutol sa pagpapababa ng edad ng pananagutan -ABS-CBN.com

Mga child advocate, NGO sa CDO, tutol sa pagpapababa ng edad ng pananagutan

CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY – Sabay-sabay na nagsindi ng kandila at nanumpa ang mga child advocate at non-government organization sa Kiosko Kagawasan, Cagayan De Oro City Martes ng gabi.

Simbolo ito ng kanilang pagtutol sa inaprubahang panukalang batas sa House Committee on Justice na babaan sa 9 anyos mula sa 15 ang edad ng mga kabataan ng puwedeng papanagutin sa mga krimen.

Inihalintulad ng City Council for the Protection of the Chidren sa ‘dough’ ang mga kabataan na kailangan pa ng gabay ng nakakatanda para hulmahin ang kanilang asal.

Hindi pa raw sapat ang edad na 9 para magdesisyon sa kanilang sarili.

Read full article @news.abs-cbn.com

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[In the news] UN’s Callamard slams lowering age of criminal liability; Palace reacts -GMAnews

UN’s Callamard slams lowering age of criminal liability; Palace reacts

United Nations Special Rapporteur Agnes Callamard took to Twitter to criticize the bill in the House of Representatives seeking to lower the age of criminal responsibility to nine years old.

Callamard on Monday called the proposal “shameful” and “potentially deadly” after the House justice committee approved the measure for the consideration of the plenary.

The bill seeks to amend Republic Act 9344 or the Juvenile Justice Law, which sets the minimum age of criminal liability at 15 years old. A counterpart measure in the Senate aims to set the age of criminal responsibility at 13.

Read full article @www.gmanetwork.com

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[From the web] World Vision calls to stop the lowering of minimum age of criminal responsibility

World Vision calls to stop the lowering of minimum age of criminal responsibility

Child-focused agency World Vision is one with other like-minded advocates and groups to stop the approval of the current House bill which attempts to lower the Minimum Age of Criminal Responsibility (MACR) from 15 to as low as 9 years old.

“We humbly call all our concerned lawmakers to set aside their differences on this one, and stay partial only for the well-being and rights of children, especially those as young as nine years old,” appeals World Vision executive director Rommel V. Fuerte. “Instead, let us please strengthen and improve the implementation of the current Juvenile Justice and Welfare Act (JJWA) which promotes less punitive and more restorative interventions for children in conflict with the law.”

Based on the proposed law, child offenders aged 9 and above, will be subjected and housed to a closed youth facility as one of the state’s measure. Lowering the age of criminal responsibility, as argued by the bill, will also deter adult criminals to exploit children in committing crimes.

Read full article @www.worldvision.org.ph

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[In the news] Children in conflict with the law are victims too — rights groups -PhilStar.com

Children in conflict with the law are victims too — rights groups

MANILA, Philippines — A children’s rights group on Friday again voiced opposition to proposals lowering the age of criminal liability as a House panel is set to finalize proposed legislation which to hold minors accountable for breaking the law.

In a statement, Salinlahi Alliance for Children’s Concerns said lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility would only “put the blame on children in conflict with the law and punish them behind bars.”

Read full article @www.philstar.com

 

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[Statement] Joint Statement of the ACWC and the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General on Violence against Children | SRSG on Violence Against Children

Joint Statement of the ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) and the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General on Violence against Children | SRSG on Violence Against Children.

 Manila, the Philippines -The ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) convened a Consultative Meeting with the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General on Violence against Children (SRSG-VAC) and CEDAW Committee experts on violence against women in Manila, the Philippines, on 16-17 January 2012. The Consultation was supported by UN Women and UNICEF.

Marta Santos Pais, Special Representative of the UN Sec Gen

The Consultation provided an opportunity to exchange views on a rights-based approach to initiatives designed to prevent and address all forms of violence against children (VAC) and violence against women (VAW), in the light of international human rights standards, in particular the Convention on the Rights

of the Child (CRC) and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), both ratified by all ASEAN Member States.

The Consultation helped to highlight good practices and experiences on the implementation of laws, policies and actions aimed at overcoming the invisibility of violence, promoting an integrated agenda for violence prevention and elimination, and improving the availability and quality of data and research on the magnitude and incidence of violence against children and violence against women.

The Commission welcomed the insightful information provided by the SRSGVAC on the process of follow-up to the recommendations of the UN Study on Violence against Children promoted in countries around the globe, and the experience gained from cooperation developed between her mandate and regional organizations and institutions aiming at building a world free from violence.

The Commission recognized the importance and potential of enhancing opportunities for dialogue and cooperation with strategic partners at the national, regional and international levels, including with the United Nations system, to accelerate progress towards the elimination of violence against children and

violence against women.

The Commission and the SRSG-VAC expressed commitment to pursue collaboration in the context of the ACWC’s mandate for the promotion and protection of the rights of women and children and efforts for violence prevention and response including within the framework of the Commission’s five-year workplan in the following activities:

a. Compiling, documenting and disseminating good practices and studies on the implementation of legislations, programmes, services and strategies to address all forms of VAW and VAC in the region;

b. Conducting regional studies of legal frameworks and response strategies towards the elimination of VAW and VAC in ASEAN Member States;

c. Promoting advocacy and policy development for the prevention and elimination of all forms of VAW and VAC;

d. Promoting, in collaboration with relevant government agencies, the availability and quality of data collection and analysis concerning VAW and VAC in ASEAN Member States;

e. Launching a regional public campaign to eliminate all forms of VAW and VAC in collaboration with the relevant ASEAN sectoral bodies, civil society, religious and local leaders, private sector and other stakeholders;

f. Developing minimum standards of delivery of services to the victims and survivors as well as perpetrators of VAW and VAC;

g. Strengthening the capacity of service providers in ASEAN Member States to prevent and address all forms of VAW and VAC; and

h. Promoting dialogues with other relevant government agencies, civil society and other stakeholders aiming at improving awareness of all forms of VAW and VAC in various sectors.

Source: srsg.violenceagainstchildren.org