Tag Archives: Women

[Statement] on Victim-blaming and Gender Stereotyping Amid the Investigations in the Christine Dacera Case -CHR

#HumanRights #Women #LGBTQI+

Statement of Commissioner Karen S. Gomez-Dumpit, Focal Commissioner on Women and LGBTQI+ Issues, on Victim-blaming and Gender Stereotyping Amid the Investigations in the Christine Dacera Case

The Commission on Human Rights is deeply concerned and alarmed by the victim-blaming and gender stereotyping amid the investigations in the killing of Christine Dacera. These acts disrespect the victim and cause further anguish to her family. Similarly, the alleged perpetrators who are members of the LGBTQI+ community are negatively affected.

As the Gender Ombud, the Commission takes this occasion to reiterate that victim-blaming is unacceptable, especially in cases of gender-based violence. Instead of responding to the act of violence in this case, as well as addressing the root causes of the human rights violation, victim-blaming is a violation of a woman’s dignity and shifts the focus of the investigation on what the victim wore, the company she kept, and the places she went to. It trivializes the violence and demonizes the woman, as the blame cast on her creates the perception that “she had it coming,” making her unworthy of protection and remedies. It must be remembered that the crux of gender-based violence cases is the acts of violence committed by the perpetrator, and never the character of the woman. We must all strive to stop victim-blaming.

Undeniably, rape is a grave and serious human rights violation requiring an urgent and immediate response from the State. The UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) Committee requires no less than the exercise by State authorities of due diligence in responding to all cases of violence against women. In investigating and discussing circumstances surrounding an alleged case of rape, all forms of victim-blaming are unacceptable. We remind the public that victim-blaming and reliance on gender stereotypes impact access to justice. These ultimately deny women protection from violence.

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[People] The Empowerment of Women- by Fr. Shay Cullen

#HumanRights #ViolenceAgainstWomen The Empowerment of Women
Shay Cullen
4 December 2020

The empowerment of women and girls is a most urgent need in today’s world where discrimination, violence and exploitation of women and girls, especially in the developing world, is tearing the heart out of society and family life causing human suffering, exclusion, sickness and death.

Education is the key to empowering women and girls and building equality in society by defeating the superior and dominant attitude of many men. Some wrongly believe they are entitled to treat women as inferior and unworthy of leadership roles in society, business and family.

At every level of social status, rich, middle class, poor, besides formal education, there has to be additional human rights training for boys and girls from the earliest age in human dignity and equality. Women have to be empowered economically by having skilled training and small business opportunities and thus take control over their lives. The economic power of women is essential for changing the inequality and the injustice in societies where women are treated unfairly and regulated to some lower status than males. Money talks and in community-based Grameen-loaning schemes, it is the women who are mostly given the loans. They are considered stronger, more reliable to pay back and wiser in using the loans and more caring of the needs of the children. Having money empowers the women and gives them status and respect in the community and in their families.

The education of boys and men in values to respect girls and women is vital. They must be taught that their own value and dignity as a human being and role in family and society is rooted in the respect for the dignity of females. The powerful machismo male, self-image that looks on females as objects of sexual gratification has to be replaced with one of respect, self-discipline and equal partnership, gender equality and complementary roles.

Without empowered, self-reliant and resilient women there is a greater danger of violence against women and children. The 2017 National Demographic and Health Survey conducted by the Philippine Statistics Authority says that one in every four Filipino women and children age 15-49 has experienced physical, emotional or sexual violence by their abusers or husband or partner. Female victims of child sexual abuse left untreated leaves the child traumatized, to grow up in fear of rape and sexual abuse. They can get help and fight back but some may be rendered fearful and submissive to the violence of the abusive male in later life. That is why intervention, protection, healing and empowerment therapy is so important. The UN Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women says it is “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public and private life. Gender-based violence is any violence inflicted on women because of their sex.”

Domestic violence against women is predominantly linked to failed intimate relationships. In many cases, these are shallow and short-lived, most are based on sexual encounters and most are loveless relationships. The woman is treated, not as a loving friend and equal partner and respected mother of the children, but as an object of sexual gratification and a servant housekeeper and cook. The dominated woman is dependent on the man as the provider for her and the children. Many beaten women endure physical abuse because of fear and dependency.

The children in a family are greatly affected by the violent rages of the man against their mother. They, too, can grow up with the notion that violence is a normal part of relationships and be violent themselves. Children can suffer violent sexual assault by the mother’s partner. Sometimes the overpowered mother will allow the man to do it as a way to sexually satisfy him and calm his violent behavior against her. About 80 percent or 32 million children suffer from violence. Seven million of these children are between the ages of 10 to 18 and are sexually abused every year.Twenty percent or 1.4 million are under six years old.

Domestic violence is physical and sometimes psychological. Arguments and verbal abuse break out constantly, leading to a broken home and child abuse. One of many examples is the family of five-year old Vangie and eight-year old Maria (not real names). Their parents had severe disagreements and violence occurred. Their mother left the children with their paternal grandmother and the father. She found another partner. After only a few months, the two small girls were set upon by the biological father and he constantly sexually abused them and raped them both. They were rescued by the Preda Foundation senior staff and social worker and are recovering in the Preda home. He will stand trial. The children will testify.

Human trafficking is another form of violence against women. Young women and minors are “captured” by false promises, lured to fake employment and end up in brothels as sex slaves to powerful men. Many endure physical and psychological violence and “rough sex.” They are victims of “debt bondage” threatened by pimps and traffickers to pay their debts to them or they will be jailed.

That is the case of some of the 18 young girls, four of them minors, that were lured and pressured to join a party where they were to be sexually sold to foreign sex tourists in a hotel in Baloy Beach, Olongapo City, last November 2020. But the plan leaked, and they were all rescued by the National Bureau of Investigation and city social workers and Preda Foundation social workers. The minors are recovering at the Preda home. The adult women are being helped by the government social workers.

There has to be a major change in the culture of male abuse and violence against women and an end to the political tolerance that allows it. The rule of law must prevail, respect for the well-being of every woman and child has to be upheld and we are challenged to stand with them for their rights and dignity.

View New Life at Preda: Resilience and Hope at https://youtu.be/G0fFNmHSYic

http://www.preda.org

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[From the web] Philippine candidate unfit for UN women’s rights body -RAPPLER.com

#HumanRights #Women Philippine candidate unfit for UN women’s rights body

Screen grabbed from Rappler,com

In the coming weeks, 189 countries from around the world will elect 23 members to the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW Committee) for the 2021-2024 term. The Philippine government recently nominated a career diplomat, Rosario Manalo, for another term on the committee. If elected, she would serve her fourth term in this UN treaty body. She was its chairperson in 2005-2006.

The CEDAW committee plays an influential role, interpreting the widely ratified Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, which affects governments’ obligations protecting women’s rights. It also receives and responds to individual complaints.

While the Philippine government hails Manalo as a champion of women’s rights, her recent record is one of undermining human rights and attacking rights groups – which disqualifies her from continuing in this capacity.

Read complete article @ Rappler.com

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[Press Release] On the 48th Anniversary of Martial Law: Women’s Groups Submit 33rd Petition vs. ATL

Photo from Kaisa-Ka

On the 48th Anniversary of Martial Law: Women’s Groups Submit 33rd Petition vs. ATL

Manila— Coinciding with the 48th Anniversary of Martial Law, women’s organizations filed the 33rd petition against the Anti-Terror Law in the Supreme Court this afternoon.

The petition gathered more than twenty-seven women petitioners cutting across all sectors of society including feminist and Martial Law survivor Aida Santos, journalist Kara Alikpala and renowned writer Lualhati Bautista.

Organizations who signed on included Pagkakaisa ng Kababaihan para sa Kalayaan (KAISA KA), Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau, Dap-Ayan Ti Babbai, KAISA KA Youth, ORYANG, PKKK, SARILAYA, WPL- WOMEN, PANGISDA-Women, YouWin and Action and Solidarity for the Empowerment of Teachers.

Representatives from the Philippine Women’s Network for Peace and Security, Citizen’s Action Against Crime, WOMANHEALTH Phils., LIKHAAN YND Women’s Committee, LAPIS.PH and NAGSSAKA also participated.

According to the petition, ‘the law is an act of State overreach at the expense of fundamental rights. It has the effect of nullifying nullify what should be protected according to the Constitution like free speech, due process, presumption of innocence, right to assembly, right against unreasonable searches and warrantless arrests, and right to bail, among others.’

It describes as ‘cavalier’ the attitude of the law to constitutional liberties in the name of “security”—promoted through fear, engendered by the threat of sanctions’ A contingent of women marchers sent off the petitioners to the gates of the Supreme Court from Taft Avenue.

Earlier, KAISA KA along with Kilusan para sa Pambansang Demokrasya (KILUSAN) held a short protest rally in Mendiola to show their continuing commitment to resist all forms and manifestations of tyrannical rule.

For More Info: Atty. Virgie Suarez – KAISA KA Chairperson 09088159923

PRESS RELEASE
September 21,2020

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[Statement] Indigenous Women Speak out: Anti-Terrorism Act is a direct threat to us as rights defenders -LILAK

Indigenous Women Speak out: Anti-Terrorism Act is a direct threat to us as rights defenders
7 August 2020

Indigenous women speak out and stood up against the Anti-Terror Act. They filed a petition before the Supreme Court questioning the constitutionality of Republic Act 11479.

Surmounting the challenges and difficulties of fulfilling technical legal requirements, Teresa dela Cruz, an Aeta Abelen from Zambales, and Nora Sukal, a B’laan woman from Tampakan, South Cotabato, are two of the petitioners of the IP-MORO petition led by the Atty. Tony La Vina and Atty. Efrenita Taqueban as co-counsels. Other petitioners are leaders, mostly women, of indigenous communities from Cordillera and Mindanao, as well as from the Moro communities of BARMM. LILAK (Purple Action for Indigenous Women’s Rights), a collective of feminists and women activists advocating for the rights and empowerment of indigenous women, is also one of the petitioners. This comes two days before the celebration of the International Day of Indigenous Peoples (Aug. 9).

In a time of pandemic, the Duterte government railroaded a bill that would neither combat COVID-19 nor better the situations of many Filipinos suffering from the pandemic. The year 2020 has seen worsening poverty, unemployment, and hunger while Duterte strengthens the military and police to battle against what it considers terrorism – the growing anger, disgruntlement and resistance to its violent, corrupt, anti-people governance.

The vague definitions of terrorist and terrorist act in ATA endanger indigenous peoples who, for years, have been threatened, harassed, terrorized and red-tagged as they assert their rights to their ancestral lands. Even before the introduction of the Anti-Terrorism Bill, the Duterte government has accused indigenous leaders – who are defenders of the environment and natural resources – of being enemies of the state.

According to the UN Human Rights Office, 248 activists were killed from 2015 to 2019, Global Witness tagged the Philippines the most dangerous country for environment and lands rights defenders. They counted 133 killings during Duterte’s presidency; 46% of the cases are believed to have been perpetrated by the Armed Forces of the Philippines; 44% occurred in Mindanao; and 22% of the victims were indigenous people. A large percentage of the killings were related to land-grabbing of agribusinesses, plantations, and mining companies and state-sponsored development projects such as mega dams and power plants. These are from killings which were reported. There are more acts of violence and killings within their ancestral domains which are not officially documented and reported.

Teresa and Nora are indigenous women who are in the frontlines of their communities’ struggle against large scale mining within their ancestral domains, and land grabbing. They themselves are victims of different forms of harassment and threats; and they fear that they are the targets of the law. According to Teresa, “Kami na mga naninirahan sa bundok, at doon nagtatanggol ng aming karapatan para mabuhay, ay nangangamba na kami ay matuturing na terorista. Dahil sa ilalim ng pamahalaang ito, ang sino man ang di payag o di sang-ayon sa kanilang gawain ay tinuturing na kaaway (We who live in the mountains, where we fight for our rights to live, are afraid that we will be considered terrorists. Because under this administration, whoever is against of their actions are considered enemies)”.

The ATA is an obvious weaponization of the law aimed to silence dissent. It is a violation of human rights and a mockery of the Philippines’ legal systems. The Anti-Terrorism Council (ATC) that has the power to permit arrests, surpassing the power of the judiciary, will consist of presidential appointees, Duterte’s loyal “yes men”.

LILAK will continue to support indigenous women and their struggles, as we join hands, and link arms in our collective defense and assertion of our rights against Duterte’s fascism, impunity, and misogyny.

For more information please contact,
judy pasimio – 09175268341 | judy104@lilak.net
Shar Balagtas – 09771966122 | sharbalagtas.lilak@gmail.com

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[Statement] KAISA KA stands up for Freedom of Expression and of the Press and the Rule of Law and Justice as significant pillars of Freedom and Democracy

KAISA KA stands up for Freedom of Expression and of the Press and the Rule of Law and Justice as significant pillars of Freedom and Democracy.

KAISA KA stands up for Ressa, a woman, a journalist, a staunch critic of DU30 administration.

KAISA KA condemns the conviction of Ressa for alleged commission of cyberlaw when the alleged “acts” took place long before the passage of the law for cyber law. The conviction is meant to clip and silence those who fight against the tyrannical, authoritarian, and misogynist administration.

Rule of law is fundamental fairness that binds freedom and democracy. The judicious application of the real essence of the rule of law is imperative considering this impacts our cherished freedoms of expression and of the press and to our treasured rights to information, due process, accountability of public officials, and a transparent, empowering government.

This administration has already owned the executive branch; coopted the legislative. And now the judiciary… a mockery of justice

Freedom of the press and speech stand for freedom of the people. It is the people’s stoutest weapon.

Our constitution and all organic laws of all free states provide that “no law shall be passed, abridging the freedom of the press and that no person shall be punished except for an abuse of that freedom.

KAISA KA believes that it is in the best interest of a civilized society to have a full and free discussion of government affairs and have the free liberty to comment upon the administration of government and guard against repressive measures. We cannot and should not speak in a whisper or with bated breath.

KAISA KA believes that it is our duty to bring to the bar of public opinion the conduct of government officials whose exercise of authority is conferred by the people. It is not only our right. It is our duty.

KAISA KA is one with every woman, every citizen, activist, human rights defender, every freedom-loving people in protest of this attack to our freedom and democracy.
Together, we will not be silenced and cowed.

We say NO to all forms of violence and tyranny.
Break the culture of silence, violence and impunity.

Atty. Virginia Lacsa Suarez
Chairperson-KaisaKa
SecGen-KILUSAN

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[Joint Statement] On disproportionate impact Covid-19 is having on women -OMCT and PAHRA

Geneva and Manila, 02 June 2020 – The members of the Women and Torture Working Group, a joint regional initiative of the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT) and the Philippines Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA), express concern over the disproportionate impact Covid-19 is having on women. The social, political, and economic sectors, in which women already face inequalities, have all been adversely affected by the pandemic.
In many countries, families share limited rooms, and homes have become particularly crowded spaces that exacerbate risks of increased domestic violence. In Bangladesh, a phone survey conducted by civil society organizations in April revealed that at least 1672 women experienced their first incidents of domestic violence during the lockdown.
Judicial, police and health services, which often provide limited assistance to victims of gender-based violence even under normal circumstances, have now shifted their priorities as a result of the pandemic or are finding themselves unable to help. In several countries, such as Sri Lanka and Nepal, the police have repeatedly refused to register domestic violence complaints.
Nepal is also one of several Asian countries where fewer cases of domestic violence are being reported under lockdown. Rather than an actual decrease in the commission of violence, this is a reflection of women’s inability to access help and report incidents under gender-blind lockdown measures. Abusers are exploiting women’s inability to escape or obtain help, and civil society actors can no longer access victims. This creates significant challenges in the collection of accurate data.
In most countries, the pandemic shines a light on already inadequate systems of protection and assistance for victims of gender-based violence. Covid-19 has merely exposed these existing gaps and vulnerabilities across the region. In the Philippines for example, there is no national hotline that specifically caters to women victims of domestic violence. The dramatic increase of violence against women is often linked to the inability of national institutions to adequately address this issue. In most countries, women were already frequently reluctant to report torture and other forms of violence, including domestic violence, and refrain from seeking justice.
In light of the above, the members of the Women and Torture Working Group call on governments in Asia to:
§  Design and implement a gender-sensitive response to the pandemic and guarantee the right of women to live free from torture and other ill-treatment. The pandemic requires national authorities to acknowledge the differential impact of Covid-19 on women and to implement rigorous measures that respond to the increase of gender-based violence.
§  Prioritize and integrate measures providing support to women victims of violence in national response plans to Covid-19. Measures include, but are not limited to:
o   Ensuring that all services of assistance for women victims of gender-based violence be considered essential services during the pandemic, and therefore remain accessible;
o   Addressing pre-existing gaps in gender-based violence response frameworks by developing all necessary services to ensure the protection of women;
o   Guaranteeing that shelters remain open and receive the resources necessary to adapt to quarantine needs;
o   Designating safe spaces for women to report incidents of abuse, such as in pharmacies, and ensuring that employees of such safe spaces are provided with a clear protocol to follow in these situations;
o   Adapting services to the pandemic situation by, for instance, moving assistance online;
o   Strengthening advocacy and communication campaigns about gender-based violence, including those targeting men. For instance, the hashtag #AntiDomesticViolenceDuringEpidemic has proven useful in China.
§  Guarantee women’s access to justice within the context of the pandemic, through measures that take into account current challenges as well as travel restrictions.
§  Guarantee the immediate release of women human rights activists and political prisoners and ensure that they are not subjected to torture and other ill-treatment while in custody.
§  Guarantee that women take an active and meaningful part in decision-making processes related to the pandemic and its aftermath.
                                                                                          
In times of emergency, violence against women increases. Covid-19 is no different. Political leaders in Asia have now an opportunity to demonstrate that this cycle can be broken. We call on governments to abide by international standards and ensure that women live free of torture and other ill-treatment, including gender-based violence.
Signatories
Members of the Women and Torture Working Group
·       Cristina Sevilla, Phillippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA), Philippines
·       Muna Baig, Association of Women for Awareness and Motivation (AWAM) and National Commission for Justice and Peace (NCJP), Pakistan
·       Habibun Nessa, Naripokkho, India
·       Prachi Lohia, Mahila Sarvangeen Utkarsh Mandal (MASUM), India
·       Roshani Giri, Advocacy Forum, Nepal
·       Sayed Hussain Anosh, Civil Society & Human Rights Network (CSHRN), Afghanistan
·       Semkidmaa Choijil, Psychological Responsiveness NGO, Mongolia
·       Shreen Saroor, Women’s Action Network / Mannar Women’s Development Federation Muslim Women Development Trust, Sri Lanka
·       Sopheap Chak, Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR), Cambodia
·       World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT), Switzerland

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[Video] Buhay-bahay (Situation of Women and Children Under Lockdown) -iDEFEND, PAHRA

Situation of Women and Children Under Lockdown

Kasama sina:

Jelen Paclarin
Executive Director,
Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau (WLB)

Dr. Maria Lourdes Mendoza
Women and Children Protection Unit,
Northern Mindanao Medical Center

Julie Ann Regalado
Division Chief, Child Rights Center
Commission on Human Rights

Rowena Legaspi
Executive Director,
Children’s Legal and Research Development Center (CLRD)

Krissi Shaffina Twyla Rubin
OIC,
Center for Gender Equality and Women’s Human Rights
Commission on Human Rights

Moderator:
Ritz Lee Santos III
Executive Director,
Balay Alternative Legal Advocates for Development in Mindanaw Inc. (BALAOD Mindanaw)

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[Video] 10 (women) Kababaihan at ang COVID-19 Crisis

Kasabay ng pag-alala sa Buwan ng kababaihan, ngayong Marso rin ay humarap ang mga Pilipino sa hamon ng umiigting na COVID19 crisis.

Ano nga ba ang sinasabi ng mga kababaihan hinggil sa hambalos ng krisis na hinaharap natin sa kasalukuyan?

Kaya naman, kinulumpon natin ang sampung Quotes mula sa mga akda ng mga kababaihang hindi natakot na magpahayag hinggil sa pagtatanggol ng Karapatan ng lahat sa gitna ng COVID19 crisis na naipaskil sa HRonlinePH.com.

1. Judy Ann Miranda, Secretary General, Partdo Mangagawa (PM)
2. Nymia Pimentel Simbulan, Chairperson, Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA)
3. Women of World March of Women (WMW)
4. Rochelle Porras, Executive Director, Ecumenical Institute for Labor Education and Research (EILER)
5. Tita Flor Santos, President of Oriang
6. Katutubong kababaihan ng Didipio, Nueva Viscaya
7. Rose Trajano, Convenor, In Defense of Human Rights and Dignity Movement (iDEFEND)
8. Judy Pasimio, National Coordinator, Purple Action for Indigenous Women’s Rights (Lilak)
9. Virgie Suarez, Chairperson, Pagkakaisa ng Kababaihan Para sa Kalayaan (KAISA-KA)
10. Edel Hernandez, Executive Director, Medical Action Group (MAG)

Pls watch and don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE to our Youtube Channel.

Photos CTTO

Panuorin ang video sa

Panuorin rin ang video ng 10 (Women) Babaeng WAGI sa puso ng mga Pinduteros at Pinduteras

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[Statement] Kababaihan, pinakamatinding tinatamaan sa krisis ng COVID19, GAD budgets, ilabas at direktang gamitin para sa kalusugan, kaligtasan at kabuhayan ng kababaihan -KAISA KA

Nasa interes ng buong sangkatauhan ang pagsugpo sa COVID 19. Bukod sa nakamamatay ay napakalaki na ang epekto at pinsalang dala nito sa ekonomya at lipunan sa daigdig.

Bago pa ang krisis ng COVID19 ay patong-patong na ang pahirap na dinaranas ng kababaihan— kawalan ng regular na trabaho, nakasadlak sa para-paraang trabaho, “unpaid family work”, kulang sa serbisyong medikal at sa iba pang batayang serbisyo, karahasan sa gitna ng gyera sa droga, at ang araw-
araw na diskriminasyon sa lahat ng aspeto ng kanyang buhay sa loob at labas ng tahanan; hanggang sa araw-araw na pambabastos at karahasan sa kanyang kasarian mula mismo sa Estado.

Sa gitna ng public health emergency, higit na peligro ang tama ng COVID19 sa kababaihan:

– Ang Pilipinas ang Top Exporter ng health workers, lalo na ng mga nurses at caregivers sa buong mundo. Mayorya nito ay mga kababaihan. Kung kayat sa pandaigdigang krisis na ito, naka-expose ang mga kababaihang Filipino healthworkers sa COVID19.

– Nuong 2017, 93,000 na Flipino nurses ang lumabas ng bansa na ang karamihan ay kababaihan,
– Sa buong mundo, ang ratio ng bilang ng Nurse to Patient ay 1:12. Ngunit sa Pilipinas, ang isang nurse natin ay nag-aalaga ng 60 pasyente sa mga hospitals (1:60). Samantala, sa Doktor, ang “ideal” na ratio ay 1:1000 populasyon; pero sa Pilipinas, mayroon lang tayong isang doctor sa bawat 33,000 na bilang ng mamayan.

– 11-14 na buntis ang namamatay dahil sa kawalang serbisyong-medikal. At pababa na ng pababa ang edad ng babaeng nabubuntis, sing-bata ng 11 taon, dahil sa kakulangan sa serbisyo sa reproduktibong pangkalusugan. Higit na mataas ang risk ng mga babaeng buntis dahil sa “physiological changes” na nangyayari sa panahon ng pagbubuntis, dagdag pa ang problema sa “mobility, emotional and psychological” na problemang nararanasa ng babae sa gitna ng pagbubutis.

– Samantala, sa usapin ng kabuhayan, 62% ng “unpaid family work” ay ginagampanan ng kababaihan; 70% naman ng gawain sa agrikultura sa kanayunan ay ginagampanan ng kababaihan; sa kalunsuran naman mayorya ng para-paraang trabaho ang kinasadlakan ng kababaihan dahil sa kakulangan ng ng industriyang magbibigay ng regular at nakabubuhay na sahod;

– At dahil sa laganap na kaisipang-patriyarkal, nasa balikat pa rin ng kababaihan ang pangangasiwa sa gawaing bahay at pangngalaga sa anak at kasamang may-edad.

Sa ganitong kalagayang panlipunan ng kababaihan at dahil sa ang babae ay nasa lahat ng sektor at pangunahing nakaharap sa buhay pakikibaka ng komunidad, kapag babae ang naapektuhan, magiging higit ang pagbilis ng “transmission” nito sa loob at labas ng kanyang tahanan.

Tunay na banta ang COVID-19 sa kalusugan at sa mismong buhay ng mamamayan, lalot nasa antas na ito ng community transmission. At nasa gitna nito ang masang anak-pawis kung saan pangunahin ang kababaihan.

Bagamat ang lahat ay pwedeng tamaan, mas malupit ang tama ng COVID19 sa kababaihang mahirap dahil sa kakulangan sa kapasidad at kakayahan na ingatan
ang kanyang kalusugann at kaligtasan: kahit anong gawin ng mahihirap sa squatters area, sa loob ng barong-barong, wala syang maiikutan o magagalawan ng hindi nya mababangga ang mismong kasama sa bahay; mahahawakan at mahahawakan nya ang lahat ng gamit; at ang maraming kabataan na mismong kalye ang tahanan, ang buo nyang pagkatao ay naka-expose na sa COVID19.

Kung kayat hindi magiging epektibo ang anumang solusyon sa pagpigil ng krisis ng COVID19 kung mula sa plano ng programa hanggang sa implementasyon ay walang- pagsasa-alang-alang sa napakahalagang papel ng kababaihan sa lipunan.

Upang mapatigil ang paglaganap ng COVID19, mapigil ang “community transmission” kailangan ang tiyak na mga hakbang para sa kalusugan, kaligtasan at kabuhayan ng ang kababaihan:

– I-prioritize ang mga kababaihan sa mahirap na komunidad sa pagbibigay ng “covid testing” lalo na ang mga matatanda, may-sakit at buntis;

– Agarang ilabas at gamitin sa pangangailangan at suporta sa kababaihan ang lahat ng GAD budgets;
o Bigyan ng financial assistance ang mga kababaihang nasa “informal work”; mga solo mothers at buntis.
o Tiyakin ang supply “personal hygiene” needs ng kababaihan;

– Agarang ilabas ang 4Ps allowance

– Tiyakin ang pagkain ng bawat pamilya sa “urban poor communities”, lalo na ang mga informal settlers at mga may sakit.

– Ayuda sa mga mamamayang magpopositibo sa COVID, magpapa-ospital man o mag-self quarantine tulad ng akses sa Philhealth lalo na’t naipasa na ang Universal Health Law.

KAISA TAYO SA PAGBAKA SA KRISIS NG COVID19!

PIGILIN ANG PAGLAGANAP NG COVID19.
TIYAKIN ANG KALUSUGAN, KALIGTASAN AT KABUHAYAN NG KABABAIHAN!

ATTY, VIRGINIA LACSA
Taga-Pangulo-Kaisa Ka
(Pagkakaisa ng Kababaihan para sa Kalayaan)

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[Video] 10 (Women) Babaeng Wagi sa puso ng mga Pinduteros

10 Women who won the #HumanRights Pinduteros Choice Awards

Taon-taon simula 2011 ay pinaparangalan ng Human Rights online Philippines ang mga posts sa HRonlinePH.com website na humataw sa hits mula sa mga mambabasa. Namayagpag ang ilang mga artikulo, videos, atbp na gawa ng mga kababaihan o kaya naman ay hinggil sa kababaihan. Dahil buwan ng mga kababaihan ngayong Marso at bilang pasasalamat natin sa inambag ng mga kababaihan para sa ika-10 anibersaryo ng HRonlinePH.com, narito ang 10 Women posts na Wagi sa puso ng mga Pinduteros…

Simulan natin sa No. 1
No. 1: An Open Letter to Pond’s and All Whitening Products By Renee Juliene M. Karunungan -3rd Human Rights Pinduteros’ Choice for HR Pindutero’s Post -2013

Ang post na ito ay isang “appeal letter” para sa Ponds na isinulat ni Ayeen Karunungan. Tumalakay ito sa isang “advertisement” ng Ponds noong 2013 na humihikayat sa kababaihan na magpaputi.

“While beauty products are there to enhance a person’s face and body, I believe they should not exist to define what beauty is.”

“Your latest TV advertisement about a young girl who was “stopped by her dark and oily skin” in doing what she wants sends a wrong message to all girls and women out there. Why should one’s skin color dictate what you can or cannot do? What is the difference between a girl who has dark skin versus a girl with light skin? Does a person who have lighter skin color automatically become more beautiful, more empowered? Does she gain more friends, admirers?” ayon pa sa apila ni Ayeen.

Ang pangalawa at pangatlong wagi sa puso ng mga pinduteros ay nagmula sa World March of Women.

No. 2: Love is…Freedom from Violence! By World March of Women – Pilipinas -3rd Human Rights Pinduteros’ Choice for HR Event -2013

Ito ay isang flashmob event na isinagawa noong valentines day ng 2013 bilang kontribusyon sa 1 Billion Rising.

“We have decided that this is a critical moment to contribute to the widening and deepening resistance to violence against women, in the wake of the epidemic of rapes in India. This becomes urgent as in the Philippines, one in 10 women aged 15-49 experienced sexual violence, and for deaf women, it is 1 in every 3 women raped. There has been an increase in violence against indigenous women especially in mining communities, including the recent murder of a pregnant woman in Tampakan. We see the rise in hate crimes against lesbians. There has been a steady growth in the prostitution of women and children as the climate and capitalist crises continue.”

No. 3: March 8, 2013, International Women’s Day -By World March of Women – Pilipinas- 3rd Human Rights Pinduteros’ Choice for HR Video- 2013
Ang video ng kanilang pagkilos noong Women’s Day 2013 ang wagi sa puso ng mga pinduteros. Kuha ito ni Clydie.

Ang pang-apat naman ay…

No. 4: The impact of Philippines’ Conditional Cash Transfer Program on Consumption by Melba V. Tutor -4th Pinduteros Choice Awards HR Off-The-Shelf 2014
“Results show that households have responded to program conditionalities but there is very little room to improve consumption of other basic needs. The recent program modification of increasing education grants to older children and covering up to secondary school completion will help households sustain induced behavioral changes over time. Stronger impact on the poorest fifth of households underscores the need to improve the targeting mechanism to address leakage issues.”

 

Sa No. 5: koihernandez.wordpress.com ni Maria Karol Hernandez – 5th HR Pinduteros Choice for HR Blogsite – 2015

Si Maria Karol Hernandez ay isa sa mga kabataang kababaihan na hindi natakot magpahayag ng kaniyang mga opinyon at tumalakay ng “anything under the sun” ika nga, using her own perspectives. Mababasa ang kaniyang mga akda sa kaniyang blog. https://koihernandez.wordpress.com/

Human Rights Pinduteros’ Choice for HR Campaigns

Isa pa sa pinaka-namayagpag na campaign ay nag mula naman sa Dakila.

No. 6: It’s about time we celebrate our SHEroes! –DAKILA- 5th Human Rights Pinduteros’ Choice for HR Campaigns – 2015
Nag-feature sila ng mga kababaihan sa iba’t-bang sector at mga Gawain. Tinampok nila ang mga ambag ng mga ito sa ating lipunan, naging inspirasyon sa mga kabataang kababaihang millennials.

Sino ang makakalimot sa hataw na
No.7: #BABAEAKO -8th HR Pinduteros’ Choice for HR CAMPAIGN -2018

Nag-viral ang #BabaeAko noong 2018. Isang hashtag na pinag-isa ang mga kababaihan ng iba’t-ibang sector sa online at offline campaigns.

Sa No.8 muli ay ang World March of Women sa kanilang post hinggil sa
Violence against women is a policy of the Duterte administration –WMW -8th HR Pinduteros’ Choice for HR NETWORKS’ POST -2018

“Violence against women is a policy of the Duterte administration. This violence is evident in the president’s economic policies, his verbal attack on women, and his marginalization of women in power. Today, International Women’s Day 2018, we are telling Mr. Duterte that we’ve had enough of these. We are rising, resisting, reclaiming our power!”

Hindi rin mawawala ang Coalition Against Traficking of Women – Asia Pacific na nagwagi sa puso ng mga pinduteros noong 2018 at 2019.

EJK Victims’ Mothers, Widows and Orphans’ Healing Journey with -CATW-AP -8th HR Pinduteros’ Choice for HR VIDEO -2018


Four Cases of Prostituted Women in 4 Minutes –by CATW-AP-9th #HumanRights PINDUTEROS CHOICE FOR HR VIDEOS -2019

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[Video] Indigenous women against mining lead dance protest to mark Women’s Day

Brgy. Didipio, Kasibu, Nueva Vizcaya – “This is a dance of our lives,” said Myrna Duyan, a Tuwali indigenous woman from Brgy. Didipio, Kasibu, Nueva Vizcaya.

Manang Myrna was one of the more than 100 indigenous women and women rights advocates who danced as a protest action to the continuing mining operations of the Australian company OceanaGold Philippines, Inc (OGPI) in Brgy. Didipio. “Tayaw” is a Tuwali dance representing unity and power to face any threat to their community. The Tuwali women danced at the barricade that the community has set up several months ago, to prevent the entry of mining equipment. The 25-year mining permit of OGPI has expired last June 20, 2019.

“What we are fighting for is our life and our children’s future. Mining has destroyed our way of living. They have destroyed our sources of food and water. To mark the International Women’s Day, we dance, we protest, and we say – no more mining. OGPI has to leave,” Manang Myrna said, speaking as the leader of the community organization, Bileg Dagiti Babbae (Power of Women).

The Tuwali women have led the movement against the destructive gold mining of OceanaGold Philippines Inc., (OGPI) for almost two decades. They now guard the picket-line in Sitio Verona, Brgy. Didipio where they maintain a round-the-clock schedule. The community has set up the barricade several months ago to prevent the entry of mining equipment as the 25-year mining permit of OGPI has expired last June 20, 2019. The women, armed only with placards and streamers bearing their calls to end mining, have successfully faced against ten-wheeler trucks and backhoes.

The “Tayaw” is a traditional Tuwali dance with three main movements – each move representing unity, power, and freedom. The women also held a “Gopa”, a Tuwali ceremonial chant that told the interwoven stories of their past and what they are fighting for to be their future. The Gopa told the women’s decades-long struggle against mining and told a story of a future where they are finally freed from it.

The Tuwali women were joined by support organizations such as LILAK (Purple Action for Indigenous Women’s Rights) and Alyansa Tigil Mina (ATM). “Indigenous peoples understand what it’s like for their land to be stolen by greedy giant mining and agricultural companies. We women understand the indescribable pain when you witness your land be destroyed and poisoned, the land where you come from – the land where you grow food,” said Mary Ann Forton, a member of LILAK and an Iraynon Bukidnon indigenous women from Antique. “As indigenous women, we are one with the Tuwali women in this fight for the land and against mining.”

According to Judy Afan Pasimio of LILAK, joining the action of the Tuwali women for Women’s Day is staying true to its origin. “The International Women’s Day has its roots from the march of thousands of women to demand their right to vote. More than a hundred years later and women are still fighting for their rights. It is important that we continue to strengthen the women’s movements as we fight for our rights and freedoms. On this day, we join the Tuwali women in their fight for their land and their life against OceanaGold.”

“We call on DENR to cancel the mining permit of OGPI. They must never be granted another renewal of their mining license; else we allow another 25 years of destruction and violations of human and environmental rights. Enough is enough,” said Caryl Pillora of ATM.

The dance protest action was led by the Bileg Dagiti Babbae, joined in by Didipio Earth Savers Multi-purpose Association Inc., (DESAMA), LILAK, ATM and Samahang Pangkarapatan ng Katutubong Magsasaka at Manggagawa Inc. (SAPAKMMI).

For more information, please contact:
judy afan pasimio – 09175268341
Shar Balagtas – 09771966122

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[Statement] Kababaihan: Pangunahan ang isang siglo ng laban tungo sa ganap na paglaya at pagkakapantay pantay -iDEFEND

Dalawampu’t limang taon mula nang ipagtibay ng buong mundo sa pamamagitan ng Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, ang kahalagahan ng pagkakapantay-pantay ng mga kasarian (gender equality) sa pangkalahatang kaunlarang panlipunan, pagkakapantay-pantay pa rin ang ating panawagan.

Tumataas ang bilang ng mga kababaihang nagpapalakad ng kabuhayan ng kanilang pamilya, o “women-headed households” (Philippine Commission on Women). Dalawang milyon sa tatlong milyong solo parents ay kababaihan (Philippine Statistics Authority). Ngunit mas malaking porsiyento ng kababaihan ang walang trabaho, mas mababa ang sahod kaysa kalalakihan at higit na nanganganib o bulnerable sa delikado at di-regular na trabaho, at abusong sekswal (Philippine Institute for Development Studies).

Ayon sa Global Gender Gap report, halos isang daang taon pa ang lilipas bago makita ang tunay na pagkakapantay-pantay ng kasarian sa buong mundo. Samantala malala pa rin ang mga balakid sa karapatan ng kababaihan at sa lipunang Pilipino patuloy itong namamayani. Simula sa pananalasa ng giyera laban sa droga hanggang sa pananalasa ng Build Build Build, dobleng hagupit ng karahasan, kahirapan, kaapihan ang tinatamo ng mga kababaihan.

Read more @idefend.ph

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[Statement] Women’s Day demands: Job security, social protection amid COVID-19 outbreak -PM

Photo by PM

As women workers marched today on the occasion of International Women’s Day, the labor group Partido Manggagawa (PM) asserted that workers are more secured when engaged in regular jobs instead of unemployed in times of crisis. The group demanded job security and social protection in response to the threat of massive job loss and health hazards from the COVID-19 outbreak.

“The capitalist system imposes a ‘no work no pay’ principle at work. So when women workers are fired from work or put on job rotation, they lose the means to protect their selves and their families. This is aggravated in third world countries where weak healthcare and social protection systems prevail,” explained PM Secretary General Judy Ann Miranda.

PM members joined protest actions in this morning at the Timog Ave. cor. Scout Tobias in Quezon City led by World March of Women and with several women groups in a march to Mendiola before noon.

Miranda, who also heads the party’s women committee, said those mass layoffs should be the last in the menu of actions that can be taken in confronting the virus outbreak, fearing this health crisis can also be used by employers to implement labor flexibilization schemes like endo and downsizing.

The Asian Development Bank on Friday said the Philippine economy could lose between $669 million and $1.94 billion as well as lose 87,000 to 252,000 jobs across five sectors due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

“We can’t just wait in grief for these things to happen as pro-active measures can be prepared. Thus we demand that the government flag down any plan by employers to implement flexibilization schemes and mass retrenchments without going through a process of negotiations with affected workers. And for those who need to face the inevitable, a stronger package of social protection must be put in place,” explained Miranda.

Read more @partidongmanggagawa2001.blogspot.com

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[From the web] Women around the world continue to challenge misogynist and sexist discourses and policies -AIph

8 March 2020

In view of the disturbing global trend of misogynist messages currently disseminated by some political and religious leaders, and the increase in oppressive and sexist policies and practices, women around the world are joining forces to consolidate and protect the rights and freedoms achieved to date. The women’s movement seeks to ensure that, far from restricting rights, further progress is made in combating the inequalities persisting in many corners of the planet. Millions of women are challenging discourses that demonize them and attempt to jeopardize the feminist movement, as well as advocates of women’s rights, gender equality, and sex education.

A discourse defending traditional values and a specific definition of the family is gaining ground and promoting an agenda that denies equality as a women’s right, the need to implement specific policies to address gender violence, their right to make decisions with regard to their bodies and to their sexual and reproductive health. This reactionary standpoint is also targeting defenders and activists for being who they are and for doing the work they do. It is a discourse that runs counter to the international agreements already recognized by the United Nations at the 1995 World Conference on Women in Beijing, which this year celebrates its 25th anniversary, and which has been ratified by a large number of countries.

“We are concerned that this type of discourse is part of the political agenda in what appears to be a global strategy against women’s rights. It is not by chance that buses with the same messages against diversity, or denying the existence of violence against women, have made appearances in Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Chile, Colombia or Kenya. That is why women are reacting more energetically than ever, the feminist movement is becoming stronger and the younger generations are becoming increasingly involved in the struggle,” said Ana Rebollar, deputy director of Amnesty International Spain.

Please click the link below to read more:

http://www.amnesty.org.ph/news/womensday2020/?fbclid=IwAR26YtrZn0NaP9bGdnJIUKIbSGLd9IBbglI9N3Dy7_uW1rfVMyfxYdHLJXM

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[Statement] On the arrest of environmental women activists in Manila -ATM

Photo by ATM

ATM Statement on the arrest of environmental women activists in Manila
Sept. 10, 2019

ATM strongly condemns the arrest and detention of women activists who staged a non-violent protest action inside Sofitel Hotel in Manila, earlier today.

The six women conducted a “mannequin challenge” inside the lobby of Sofitel Hotel to protest against destructive mining operations in the Philippines. An international mining conference was holding its opening program when the protest was launched by environmental groups led by LILAK, Oriang, and PKKK.

The arrest and detention of the activists was unnecessary as the action was exactly done in a silent and non-disruptive manner, with the women posing as “mannequins” to depict the lack of voice and power of women affected by destructive mining projects.

ATM condemns the police for the unnecessary arrest. This is an over-reaction by the police, the hotel security and he organizers of the mining conference, and only shows that the mining industry and the police have limited understanding of freedom of expression.

ATM, especially its Women and Mining Working Group, will intensify its resistance and cry out with a louder voice to protect our environment and the future generations against destructive mining.

Paul John Nieves Delin
Media and Communications Officer
Alyansa Tigil Mina

Contact us:
Globe: (+63) 906-0419-2895 or (63+)956-703-9741
Telephone Number:(02) 917-3794
Facebook: AlyansaTIgilMina
Twitter: atm_philippines
Instagram: atm_philippines
Website: https://www.alyansatigilmina.net

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[Statement] We Won’t Be Silenced! – Lilak Statement on the Arrest and Detention of Young Women Environmental Activists

Lilak strongly condemns the Chamber of Mines of the Philippines’ (CoMP), Sofitel Philippine Plaza Manila’s, and the Philippine National Police’s (PNP) violent response to what was meant to be a peaceful and non-disruptive protest action.

On September 10, Tuesday, a silent protest amid the Mining Philippines International Conference and Exhibit by young women from the Alyansa Tigil Mina (ATM) Women and Mining Working Group was violently disrupted. The young women were then arrested and detained.

Young women from LILAK (Purple Action Indigenous Women’s Rights), together with indigenous women from the Maporac Aetas Organization (MAO), the National Rural Women Coalition (PKKK), and Oriang, painted their bodies with the words Kalikasan, Kabuhayan, Karapatan, and Kinabukasan in protest of large-scale mining in the Philippines.

The women including a Lilak representative who was documenting the silent protest were arrested, detained, and taken to a police precinct where they were questioned. The Sofitel’s security staff, which was composed of undercover security personnel, extracted the young women using brute force and went as far as to cover the women’s mouths and noses with cloths. One of our sisters begged the security to let her breathe. This forceful extraction caused injury among three of our companions.

The overreaction, violence, and uncalled for arrest and detention from the security officers of Sofitel and PNP is a testament of CoMP’s and the Philippine government’s intolerance against environmental activists.

Lilak, as a collective of women human rights activists supporting indigenous women’s struggles and as a convener of the ATM Women and Mining Working Group, will continue its fight against large-scale mining and extractives, against the displacement of indigenous peoples, and against prejudice and violence of environmental and human rights activists and women human rights defenders.

#WeWontBeSilenced #KababaihanLumalaban #KababaihanLabanMina
#KatutubongLilak #LILAK

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[Statement] CHR spokesperson, Atty. Jacqueline Ann de Guia, on the recent offences against women’s dignity

Media plays a powerful role in shaping mindsets on critical issues. As such, they are seen as secondary duty bearers charged with the duty to equally ensure that their conduct contributes to the protection and promotion of rights.

As such, the Commission on Human Rights lauds ABS-CBN for not condoning inappropriate behaviour, including a rape joke, made in one of its programs. We believe that appropriating a sanction for the offence made, rather than dismissing it as a display of humour, sends a strong message on the need to respect everyone’s rights and dignity, especially women. We hope that this episode on national television serves as a teachable moment for all Filipinos.

On a similar note, we urge the University of Santo Tomas to ensure that those who leaked the lewd photos and videos of women without their consent are dealt with the highest standards of justice and human dignity in mind.

Schools and universities are expected to help shape values of their students, alongside parents and guardians. It is, then, in the best interest of the children to be able to correct actions early, particularly those seen to disrespect and devalue the humanity of others by disregarding their rights, while those who can be made accountable before our laws are tried for the alleged wrong that was done. In this way, we demonstrate that human rights are everyone’s concern—not of only those involved in violations.

https://www.facebook.com/notes/commission-on-human-rights-of-the-philippines/statement-of-chr-spokesperson-atty-jacqueline-ann-de-guia-on-the-recent-offences/2133268653456335/

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