Tag Archives: University of the East

[Statement] On the recent harassment of UE Dawn’s editor-in-chief for posting opinion on the government’s inaction towards COVID-19 pandemic- The Guild

The Guilds strongly condemn this kind of harassment to Joshua Molo, editor-in-chief of the University of the East’s Dawn, after he has been subjected to threats by his former teachers and the responding officials of Cabiao, Nueva Ecija where he resides.

Mr. Molo was forced to publicly apologize after a former high school teacher cried foul over his posts in his personal social media space. The teacher sought help to area officials where they threatened to file a cyber-libel case against Mr. Molo. The editor-in-chief was then threatened to be forcibly picked up once he discontinues posting his opinions towards the government.

May it be known to everybody that this kind of act against Mr. Molo is a clear violation to Article III Section 4 of the Bill of Rights which states that no law shall be passed abridging the freedom of speech, of expression, or of the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and petition the government for a redress of grievances.

The publication strongly believes that Mr. Molo, and everyone’s right to free speech should not be delimited or bounded by praises to the government. This act of persecution is suppressive and dehumiliating and that people behind this blatant act must be deemed responsible for forming guilt to someone who has not done anything wrong to feel so.

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Designed and Photo by John Robin S. Abejar

#TheGuilds
#DefendPressFreedom

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[From the web] Joshua Molo, editor-in-chief of UE Dawn, the official student publication of the University of the East, was forced to apologize in public over a Facebook post criticizing negligence amid the coronavirus pandemic

𝗔𝗟𝗘𝗥𝗧: Joshua Molo, editor-in-chief of UE Dawn, the official student publication of the University of the East, was forced to apologize in public over a Facebook post criticizing the Duterte administration’s negligence amid the coronavirus pandemic.

This happened after Molo argued with his former high school teachers, who were offended by Molo’s online post.

At around 1:00 p.m. today, April 5, barangay officials of Cabiao, Nueva Ecija, escorted Molo, together with her mother, who is also an officer of their barangay.

Meanwhile, one of Molo’s former journalism teachers, namely, Jun Ainne Francisco went to their barangay hall in San Fernando Sur to ask for blotter. Molo was accused of cyber libel because he called out his teachers for making fun of his earlier post.

“Inaamin ko po na ako ay nagkamali, at hindi na muling mauulit ang pangyayari,” said Molo in his public apology posted online.

Moreover, Molo’s case is not the first recorded attack against press freedom this time of the pandemic.

On March 25, Today’s Carolinian (TC), the official student publication of the University of San Carlos, published an article condemning the order of Cebu Governor Gwendolyn Garcia against its critics for tracing individuals who will criticize the government’s actions against the COVID-19.

Garcia also commented to the article, inviting the editor-in-chief of TC, Berns Mitra, to discuss the matter, which is a clear manifestation to intimidate her critics.

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[From the web] DAKILA condemns the harassment of Joshua Molo, the Editor-in-Chief of the UE Dawn, for publishing his opinion about the current administration’s response in the #COVID19 pandemic

We strongly condemn the harassment of Joshua Molo, the Editor-in-Chief of the University of the East’s official publication UE Dawn, for publishing his opinion about the current administration’s response in the #COVID19 pandemic.

Earlier today, Molo was threatened by barangay officials with the filing of a libel case against him if he will not issue a public apology after he criticized the Durterte administration which offended some of his high school teachers.

We believe that this is a direct attack not only to campus journalists, media practitioners, and society’s watchdogs but also to citizen who are expressing their dissent whether online or offline.

Now more than ever, we must never be silenced for upholding our freedoms and rights. Let us continue to #HoldTheLine and #DefendPressFreedom.

#UpholdFreedomOfExpression

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[From the web] Youth activists of martial law years share tales of courage – Bulatlat

Youth activists of martial law years share tales of courage – Bulatlat.

By ANNE MARXZE D. UMIL, Bulatlat.com
September 26, 2012

‘Nothing has changed… The same problems plague our country and it’s only getting worse.’

MANILA – As Bonifacio Ilagan prepared to attend the University of the Philippines (UP) as freshman in 1969, his neighbors warned him. Coming from a province, he said: “When people in our place leaned that I am headed to UP, they told me to be careful,” Ilagan told Bulatlat.com. UP was known then as a hotbed of student activism. But instead of getting frightened, Ilagan became curious.

“The activists then were only a small group of students gathering at Vinzon’s Hall. I thought the warning was overrated.” At the Vinzon’s hall, students would gather and discuss current issues such as tuition fee increases, oil price hikes, and the government’s suppression of rights.

“And these students really knew what they were talking about. Many students, even those who were not organized, attended forums and rallies. They were very receptive to progressive thoughts. Student organizers then were getting high grades while doing political work at the same time,” Ilagan said.

Educating the youth did not just happen in universities. I communities, the out-of-school youth were also organized.

Jose Tausan was only 15 years old, a third year high school student, when he met student activists from the University of the East sometime in 1970. “They went to our community at V. Mapa, Sta. Mesa to form a chapter of Kabataang Makabayan. I became a member of that chapter,” Tausan said.

Tausan also organized students and youth in the community. “We held rallies outside the campus and teach-ins to educate ourselves about the crisis.”

The students also immersed themselves in trade unions. “We integrated with workers and helped to organize workers and form unions,” Ilagan said.

The student movement during the first quarter of 1970 was described by Ilagan as like “flowing water” – it was later called the First Quarter Storm. “It was as if there was an explosion. Learning much about the country’s situation – about oil price hikes, the economic decline, graft and corruption – also contributed to the outburst,” he said. Thousands joined the protests, even as these were violently dispersed.

Ilagan said the progressive movement was fast developing at the time. In August of 1971, after the Plaza Miranda Bombing, Marcos suspended the writ of habeas corpus in the hope of suppressing the mass movement. “Student and activist leaders were also targeted by the government then and we learned that they had a list of (target) union and youth leaders,” he said.

Read full article @ bulatlat.com

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