Tag Archives: Climate justice

[Statement] Climate Justice Group calls on Duterte to take Paris Agreement seriously; PH vulnerable to destruction from climate change | PMCJ

#HumanRights #ClimateJustice

Climate Justice Group calls on Duterte to take Paris Agreement seriously; PH vulnerable to destruction from climate change

On February 24, 2021, President Rodrigo Duterte acknowledged the reality of the negative impact of climate change through his weekly national address, citing the rapid increase of flooding in multiple areas, “Noong una, ‘yong climate change medyo ano [sic] pa ako noon na parang ayaw ko maniwala. But ngayon, sobra talaga ang tubig na galing sa langit because of [sic] umiinit ho ang planeta”. In 2016, President Duterte refused to sign the Paris Treaty on behalf of the country citing the Philippines’ need to industrialize, before finally agreeing to sign it in 2017 after pressure from several climate justice groups.

It has been proven through scientific research that flooding comes as a consequence of industrial mining operations and deforestation, a fact that which President Duterte fails to acknowledge in his weekly address, concluding his statement on increased incidences of flooding in the country by stating that “there is only one thing really that can save this planet, it’s God. Maybe we should pray more, whatever the God.” Philippine Movement for Climate Justice’s National Coordinator Ian Rivera states that, “With this kind of thinking, and coming from a head of a country that is most vulnerable to climate change, will the Filipinos be saved from the impacts of the climate crisis? Prayer must always be supplemented by action—and for this anthropogenic climate crisis, what we need is a president who understands the science and the leadership it so requires for concrete efforts. The situation is still not hopeless.” He continues that the country may still reduce the negative effects of climate change, should the administration remain ambitious in following through with our Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) to the treaty, as well as “the moral charge to demand those actions from rich polluter countries”.

The Philippines remains one of the most vulnerable nations to the destructive effects of climate change. PMCJ calls on President Rodrigo Duterte and his administration to put climate justice at the forefront of the Philippine survival from the climate crisis. Through concretizing efforts towards an ambitious NDC, and upholding our country’s end of the Paris Agreement, it is possible to reverse the catastrophic effects of climate change, and achieve a global temperature of not more than 1.5 degrees c.

https://web.facebook.com/ClimateJusticePH/photos/a.153468781484242/1790241807806923/

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[Statement] Declare Climate Emergency Now, Pursue the Path toward Zero Waste and Toxics-Free Society -EcoWaste Coalition

#HumanRights #ClimateEmergency Declare Climate Emergency Now, Pursue the Path toward Zero Waste and Toxics-Free Society

We, member groups of the EcoWaste Coalition, express our solidarity with the urgent plea made by climate-action and -justice advocates urging the government to declare, amid a raging health pandemic, a climate emergency in response to the massive destruction in the Philippines brought about by the climate crisis. The litany of typhoons brought by the climate crisis destroyed lives and communities that Covid19 “spared” thus far.

It can neither be denied nor ignored that we are in a climate crisis. Now more than ever, our vulnerable people — who bear the brunt of a warming planet — are experiencing first-hand the cruel consequences of climate change as manifested in our series of battles against more frequent and more destructive weather disturbances, which are claiming lives and causing massive damages to homes and communities, food, agriculture and fisheries sectors and the ecosystems that provide vital goods and services for sustaining the people’s well-being.

As our nation continues to suffer from the atrocious impacts of climate change, we believe that those responsible for this deepening crisis, especially the corporate polluters and forest and biodiversity destroyers and their financiers, must be held to account for their environmental crimes. Public officials who continue to ignore the real causes and effects of climate change, and the need for decisive and urgent actions must likewise be held liable for their inability to protect public health and the environment.

To put climate action and justice at the heart of the government’s policy and program, we urge President Rodrigo Roa Duterte to declare a State of Climate Emergency NOW. Such a declaration will compel the government and society to acknowledge that we live in and are seriously threatened by the climate crisis. Our government must lead urgent actions and devise strategies and measures not just to address, prepare, and adapt in such a crisis but also thrive in a consistent, holistic, sustainable and whole-of-society manner to reduce if not avoid its impacts on people, species and the ecosystems.

We strongly believe that the declaration of a State of Climate Emergency will pave the way for the urgent implementation of climate action strategies and plans to address the vulnerabilities of most impacted sectors and communities, including the suspension of environmentally destructive and climate change driving activities, the allocation of funds for climate mitigation and adaptation to protect, repair and rehabilitate destroyed ecosystems, and to increase society’s adaptive capacity and resilience, and reduce the crisis’ economic, environmental, health and social costs. Our government must also use and prioritize in our COVID-19 recovery efforts policies and programs to address this longer-term climate emergency and not simply put in place stop-gap and short term measures.

This declaration will also drive the country towards more ambitious mitigation measures that faithfully adhere to our Nationally Determined Contributions to the Paris Agreement. Furthermore, it will speed up our efforts to transition towards healthy, sustainable energy and away from fossil fuels, including false solutions such as waste-to-energy incineration that are designed to perpetuate the extraction from, exploitation and destruction of our environment and natural resources.

To this end, we further urge the government to embrace Zero Waste and Clean Production as key strategies for protecting the climate and our people and for achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals. These strategies are proven to conserve energy and raw materials, stimulate product design for environmental sustainability and local economic development, mainstream the precautionary principle, promote substitution of hazardous chemicals, reduce waste and pollution from extraction, manufacturing, transportation and disposal, create jobs and livelihoods, support local self-reliance and a local circular economy.

Finally, we urge the government to ban single-use plastic, reduce plastic production, use and packaging waste, issue the list of non-environmentally acceptable products and packaging, stop waste importation, and halt deceptive schemes undermining Zero Waste, including the co-processing of waste in cement kilns and waste-to-energy incineration.

Declare a climate emergency now, and pursue the path toward a zero waste and toxics- and fossil fuel-free society!

Eileen B. Sison
President, EcoWaste Coalition
EcoWaste Coalition
78-A Masigla Extension, Barangay Central, 1100 Quezon City, Philippines
Phone: +632-82944807 E-Mail: info@ecowastecoalition.org
Website: http://www.ecowastecoalition.org, http://ecowastecoalition.blogspot.com

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[Statement] Philippine Movement for Climate Justice to Philippine Government: Declare a Climate Emergency Now!

#HumanRights #ClimateEmergency Philippine Movement for Climate Justice to Philippine Government: Declare a Climate Emergency Now!

With just mere days in between, the Philippines was struck by several strong typhoons–Typhoon Molave (Typhoon Quinta), Typhoon Goni (Typhoon Rolly), dubbed as “the strongest typhoon of 2020,” and Typhoon Vamco (Typhoon Ulysses). Together with Typhoons Siony and Tonyo, the series of five typhoons has been unprecedented as devastations already covered six regions in the whole island of Luzon. The scope and coverage are almost equal to Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) in 2013.

Sixteen people have died in the devastation following Rolly, and 37 people have died in the floods and heavy winds carried by Ulysses–both storms affecting almost millions of families, communities. Just in Bataan alone, a whopping 89 million pesos worth of damages for agriculture and 24 schools rendered unusable. While data has still to be aggregated for these 4th quarter typhoons – data for the two typhoons, Rolly and Ulysses already have a combined Php 19.2 Billion of damages in agriculture and Infrastructures as of November 14. In its aftermath, Typhoon Ulysses has sunk the provinces of Isabela and Cagayan, as residents are bracing for more floods when massive water will be released from Magat Dam.

These scales of destruction and deaths could have been avoided knowing the Philippine record and experiences with strong typhoons and climate impacts. However, the Philippine government never learns from the past as scales of destruction and deaths have never been avoided or minimized. As strong weather events have battered the country, typhoons are not only the killers but also flooding and landslide, which accompany them. Destruction and death would not have been worse if the government’s readiness is at the scale of the understanding of the science of climate impacts and its seriousness in the protection of watersheds, ecological recovery of river basins, and the termination of all destructive activities. Mining, quarrying, property development in protected watershed areas, and constructing large dams destroy the watersheds’ ecological purpose. The flooding of Marikina, Isabela, Cagayan, and the towns of Infanta and Nakar in Quezon province are prime examples of the continuing policy mistakes the government refuses to rectify. While it is not yet late, the government must stop its plan to construct the Centennial Kaliwa Dam Project and all other major dams in the pipeline.

For years, the Philippine Movement for Climate Justice has been calling for the government to declare a climate emergency and has repeatedly warned about the impacts of the climate crisis. Still, these have never get traction within the Duterte Administration. The senseless neglect of the calls for urgent climate action in the governance finds the Duterte Government itself in a cyclical pattern of abandonment of its obligation, which ultimately points to the denial of climate deaths and destruction worldwide and dismissive of science.

With two remaining years of its administration, PMCJ challenges President Duterte to place climate action at the center of its government’s policy by declaring a climate emergency, allocate funds for adaptation, address past climate impacts, and lead and prepare the Filipino people in building safe, sustainable, resilient communities. PMCJ likewise demands accountability on the Duterte administration for its failure to prepare and anticipate these impacts as these are already qualified and known and for putting the lives of the people at risk. It is about time that the people demand justiciability not just for those governments responsible for global warming but also for the Philippine government’s failure to address past and current impacts and prepare the country for the climate crisis.

DeclareClimateEmergency

ClimateJusticeNow!

Source: facebook.com/ClimateJusticePH/

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[Statement] Kanlungan on the recent typhoons and call for climate justice

#HumanRights #ClimateEmergency Kanlungan’s statement on the recent typhoons and call for climate justice

Kanlungan centre Foundation Inc would like to express our solidarity and unity to all who have been affected by the recent typhoons.

Climate emergency is here.We need to act together to demand for reparation and accountability

Climate induced migration have resulted to displacement and force migration to millions of people all over the world.


The securitization of borders and continued threat to migrants and climate refugees also exacerbates the situation.

In the Philippines, climate induced migration is forcing people to migrate either internally or externally , forcing them to leave their love ones. Putting them at risk of falling prey to human traffickers and illegal recruiters.

We support the call to declare Climate emergency now!

Climate justice should not be a rhetoric from the state, they should act with extreme urgency .The clock is ticking and its ticking so fast

We call upon all migrants to support the demand for climate justice . The hard earn money and properties you bought out from working overseas is under threat as shown by the recent floodings. We need to demand accountability

Declare climate emergency now!

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[From the web] The Coal Death March: Limay, Bataan’s Case for Climate Justice -by Beatrice Tulagan, ClimateStories.ph

The Coal Death March: Limay, Bataan’s Case for Climate Justice
by Beatrice Tulagan, ClimateStories.ph

Once upon a time, there was a fifty-seven-year-old grandmother with kind eyes. She was loved dearly in her community for leading the charge against a coal stockpile in her neighborhood. In her spare time, she manned her family’s karaoke bar and joked around with her eighteen grandchildren.

One night, just before eight in the evening, a gunman slowly walked inside and unceremoniously shot her dead.

This man will never be caught, and the moment he straddled his masked companion’s motorcycle will be the last anyone will ever see of him. The case will be dismissed for lack of suspects. The plethora of all the other things that went wrong that night would dawn on everyone too late only to sear themselves into the memory and perpetual regret: the frantic chase that ended when the perpetrators turned off their lights and went into the night undetected, the failure of the police to set up checkpoints, the shrapnel that grazed the shoulder of a child who just happened to be at the wrong place at the wrong time, like she was.

This is the story of Gloria Capitan, the leader of Samahan ng Nagkakaisang Mamamayan ng Lucanin (SNML). In March 2015, Capitan led a petition addressed to the Lucanin village council, the government of Mariveles and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources to shut down the coal facility. She had no known enemies and had no other political activities other than campaigning for a healthier, safer home for her and her family. For many environmental activists, her story is an all too familiar tale following years of intimidation, of death threats and of bribe attempts in exchange for silence set against a dark time of impunity making the daily headlines.

The Philippines was named the deadliest in Asia for environmental activists in 2017 by London-based watchdog Global Witness, putting forward an even steeper price on activism against environmental degradation, such as the country’s continued reliance on coal-fired power plants. But Capitan’s fellow activists in the Coal-Free Bataan Movement continue her legacy, up in arms still against existing and new coal plant projects in the region.

“Why won’t we fight?” the activists say. “It’s our lives.”

Read full article @www.climatestories.ph

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[Press Release] Climate Justice Group and Sariaya communities oppose the construction of San Miguel Corporation 600 MW coal-fired facility -PMCJ

Climate Justice Group and Sariaya communities oppose the construction of San Miguel Corporation 600 MW coal-fired facility

(April 30, 2018, Sariaya, Quezon). On what has been a people power action, the Philippine Movement for Climate Justice (PMCJ) with the residents and barangay officials of the Barangays San Roque, Castanas and Talata Aplaya, civil society groups of Sariaya together with the Nina Maria Paris devotees and the Roman Catholic Church in the area showed their strong rejection of the plan of the San Miguel Corporation to put up a 600 MW coal-fired power plant in the town of Sariaya. The supposed plan will be constructed within the three (3) barangays Barangays San Roque, Castanas, and Talata Aplaya.

“People are now rising up against the impacts of coal-fired power plants in the Philippines, and here in the town of Sariaya, it is now the turn of the citizens of Sariaya to turn back the plan of by SMC said Val Vibal of Aniban ng Manggagawa sa Agrikultura. “The Catholic Church is opposed to coal-fired power plants, as it is detrimental to the integrity of life and creation. Communities host to coal-fired plants is rendered impoverished and poor. Look at Limay in Bataan, Calaca in Batangas or all other coal plants, the people are deprived at and getting impoverished,” continued Vibal.

The Sariaya SMC 600 MW coal plant facility is part of the 11 power projects with nearly 2,000 megawatts (MW) that has been cleared by the Department of Energy (DOE) for grid impact studies in October. Latest DOE data showed the 11 projects are seen to generate 1,877.9 MW of power. The GIS is necessary for determining if the electricity to be generated by the power project can be absorbed by the grid.

“SMC must now invest in renewables as this is now the economically most competitive source of energy available now in the market. If they plan to set up solar or wind here in Sariaya, this people power against coal will never have to happen. All coal-fired power plants owned by SMC all over the country have lots of issues and people are against it. We will not forget the community in Limay Bataan who early part of January 2017 mobilized against the hazards of coal.” exclaimed Ian Rivera Jr., the National Coordinator of Philippines Movement for Climate Justice. “Despite this, the policy of coal still remains and the government has to be blamed. It is now up to the Duterte Administration to decide against coal or else the community will keep fighting back against coal including this inutile government. Coal-fired plants do not provide jobs and livelihood, but they take them away. The local economy where the lives of hundreds of thousands of people depended on it will be destroyed” Rivera stressed.

FOR INQUIRIES:
Ian C. Rivera Jr., PMCJ: 09174746178

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[Press Release] NGOs say NO to coal financiers JICA and Bank of Tokyo MUFJ

NGOs say NO to coal financiers JICA and Bank of Tokyo MUFJ

Photo from Tebteba FB

http://world.350.org/…/press-re…/no-to-btmu-and-jica-at-gcf/

SONGDO, July 5, 2017 — Today, 8 Japanese NGOs and an international coalition of civil society groups urged the Green Climate Fund (GCF) Board to reject applications for accreditation from the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ (BTMU) and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA).

In a statement delivered at the 17th Green Climate Fund (GCF) Board, Japanese groups cited BTMU and JICA’s ongoing financial support for coal and extreme fossil fuel projects that undermine the goals of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius. These projects include controversial coal-fired power plants in Vietnam and Indonesia that are the subject of ongoing opposition from community groups due to their impacts on local livelihoods and violations of human rights. Both BTMU and JICA’s inadequate social and environmental protections for energy sector financing are cited as further justification for the rejection of their accreditation applications.

The statement was endorsed by more than 50 additional organizations and movements across Asia, expressed in an open letter to the GCF Board. In the letter, Asian organizations from more than a dozen countries echo the call for the GCF not to accredit these two institutions, stating that they are also witness to the devastating impacts of coal projects on communities and local ecosystems, as well as to the climate and the whole planet.

Alongside the civil society organizations’ statement, activists held a protest action this morning in front of the GCF Headquarters in Songdo, Korea, to urge the GCF board to reject the accreditation applications. A group of CSO representatives and activists converged with signage that read, “Green Climate Fund: No to Fossil Fuel Funders” and “No to JICA and No to BTMU”.

Lidy Nacpil, Coordinator – Asian Peoples Movement on Debt and Development (APMDD) and Active CSO observer to the GCF said, “JICA and BTMU’s accreditation will send a signal that the GCF Board condones the continued expansion of coal-fired power and financing for fossil fuels globally. This conflicts with the Funds’ vision to ‘promote a paradigm shift to low-emission and climate-resilient development.’ The accreditation of such institutions will be detrimental to the reputation of the GCF.”

Shin Furuno, 350.org Japan Divestment Campaigner stated of GCF’s application review: “The GCF has an opportunity to regain its integrity as an international institution tasked with financing the transition towards a zero carbon economy by rejecting the accreditation of institutions like JICA and Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, which are major financiers of coal fired power and extreme fossil fuel expansion. At the very least, the GCF Board should require Accredited Entities to disclose their exposure to carbon assets and set clear metrics and targets to reduce portfolio emissions in line with the Paris Agreement.”

Ayumi Fukakusa, Climate and Energy Campaigner from FoE Japan said , “The Indramayu coal fired power project in JICA’s financing pipeline is in danger of breaching the human rights of local people and wrecking their livelihoods. By rejecting JICA’s accreditation, the GCF can send a message that support for so-called ‘clean-coal’ is inadmissible.”

The CSO statement to the GCF reiterates that JICA’s support for so called “clean coal” is inconsistent with GCF objectives to catalyze ‘a paradigm shift towards low-carbon and climate resilient development.’ Similarly, civil society organisations note that BTMU’s substantial support for extreme fossil fuel development, combined with abysmal opacity in the company’s policies regarding fossil fuel finance, is incompatible with the GCF’s role in combating climate change.

Between 2003-2017 JICA provided financing in the amount of $USD3.7 billion (1) for coal power plants in India, Vietnam and Bangladesh. Many of the projects JICA has funded face strong opposition from local communities, like the 1000MW Indramayu coal-fired power project in Indonesia, which is currently in JICA’s financing pipeline.

BTMU’s parent company Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group (MUFG) provided an estimated USD$9.57 billion in loans to extreme fossil fuel companies over a 3 year period during 2014-16 (2). MUFG massively increased exposure to coal power even after the conclusion of the Paris Agreement, increasing their loans of USD$845 million to coal power companies in 2015 to USD$2.16 billion in 2016, representing a 156% increase in coal lending amidst serious social and environmental concerns. In March 2017, BTMU signed a finance agreement for the expansion of Vinh Tan 4 coal fired power plant in Vietnam, which will likely increase impacts on marine biodiversity and air pollution caused by the existing power plant (3). In June 2016, BTMU agreed to finance the Batang coal fired power plant and the expansion of Tanjung Jati B coal fired power plant in March 2017 in Indonesia. Both projects are opposed by community groups due to their impacts on local livelihoods, marine ecosystems, human health, and violations of human rights.(4)(5)

While the coalition of civil society groups strongly rejected the accreditation of BTMU and JICA, they recommended at a minimum that the GCF Board should require both institutions to disclose their exposure to carbon-related assets, their investment policies to manage climate risk in line with the 1.5-2 degree warming scenario, and metrics and targets for decarbonizing their investment portfolios as recommended by the Task Force on Climate Related Financial Disclosures.

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[People] Déjà vu: Why I am strongly against our signing the Paris climate deal -By Walden Bello

Déjà vu: Why I am strongly against our signing the Paris climate deal

‘The reality is that this is a deal crafted to suit the United States, China, and other big emitters’
Walden Bello
Published at Rappler
November 06, 2016

Walden Bello word.world-citizenship.orgOn the Paris Climate Agreement, I beg to disagree with the assertion that it is a milestone on the way to stopping or slowing down climate change. This is propaganda. The reality is that this is a deal crafted to suit the United States, China, and other big emitters to legitimize their stubborn refusal to make the very deep cuts in their greenhouse gas emissions that are necessary to prevent the global mean temperature from going beyond 2 degrees Celsius that would bring about massive cataclysmic changes in the climate.

Owing to pressure from the big emitters, what we have in the Paris Agreement are not obligatory commitments to cut emissions but non-binding voluntary “intended nationally determined contributions.” Indeed, even before the Paris negotiations, the US and China had already made a separate deal that undermined the multilateral process: their non-binding deal exempted China from reducing its emissions until 2030 and committed the US to a miserly 26% to 28% emissions cut from 2005 levels! Practically all serious climate scientists have already denounced these so-called commitments as grossly inadequate in the light of drastic weather changes that are just around the corner.

Instead of a robust financing mechanism to assist poor countries adjust to climate change, we have a Green Climate Fund that is starved of funds and to which contributions by the developed (Annex 1) countries are indeterminate and voluntary. And while the Agreement rhetorically recognizes that developing countries have been damaged by the emissions of the rich countries, it also says that the so-called Loss and Damage provision “does not involve or provide a basis for any liability or compensation.”

What the Paris deal is partial to are schemes favored by corporations like carbon trading, carbon offsets, and tree planting programs like REDD+. These are false solutions that only deflect attention from the need for deep binding commitments by the developed countries.

We are back in 1994, when we warned against ratifying the World Trade Organization agreement, but the Ramos administration went ahead and ratified it, saying not ratifying it would cut the Philippines off from the rest of the world and calling opponents like me all sorts of names. Twenty-two years later, our agriculture and industry have been destroyed by the trade liberalization that ensued, and indeed, the consensus of developing countries now is that the WTO simply functioned as a mechanism for the North to resubordinate the rising economies of the South. Now the same Fidel Ramos is again calling on the government to approve another unequal agreement!

We cannot afford to make the same mistake.

I don’t know and don’t care to know why President Rodrigo Duterte is opposed to signing the Paris Agreement. All I know is that whoever were the head of state today, I would recommend against signing the deal. Indeed, if the Philippine government does not sign on, this would encourage other developing country governments to withhold their signatures and expose the fact that the emperor wears no clothes.
No deal is better than a bad deal, and the Paris Climate Agreement is a bad deal. – Rappler.com

A climate advocate, former congressman Walden Bello was one of the leaders of the national movement against the ratification of the World Trade Organization Agreement in 1994.

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[Press Release] Climate Justice Group welcomes Climate Change Commission Resolution Challenges Incoming President Duterte for Sweeping Reforms in Energy Sector -PMCJ

Climate Justice Group welcomes Climate Change Commission Resolution
Challenges Incoming President Duterte for Sweeping Reforms in Energy Sector

PMCJ LOGO NEWPhilippine Movement for Climate Justice (PMCJ), a nationwide climate justice coalition expressed its appreciation for the latest Climate Change Commission resolution calling for the review of the Philippine energy policy and harmonization of regulation on new and existing coal plants “in accordance with a low carbon development pathway. “

“This resolution is consistent with the Philippine commitment to contribute to the global effort to keep temperature to below 1.5 degrees, and a significant development in the face of the long standing demand by many communities and peoples organizations in the Philippines to shift away from coal energy,” commented Ian Rivera, the National Coordinator of the broadest climate justice coalition in the Philippines.

The Philippines led the Climate Vulnerable Forum, a group of governments from 20 countries, in successfully pushing for the inclusion in the Paris climate agreement of the aspirational goal to limit global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius.  “The urgency of addressing the climate crisis is deeply felt by our people, having experienced massive devastation from extreme weather events related to climate change, such as supertyphoons and super-El Ninos. It is only right that we lead in the effort to address change – not only in words but in action” said Rivera.  “We hope this resolution will actually lead to the reversal of the Aquino government’s policy of expansion of coal energy, and a swift transition to renewable and clean energy for people and communities,” he added.

“This resolution is long overdue.  We have been fighting against coal plants and coal mines for a long time, being witness to the horrific effects of coal projects on communities, on people’s health and livelihoods, on our local environment. We are also against coal energy because it is one of the leading contributors to climate change” said Mr. Roldan Gonzales, Executive Director of Gitib, Inc., and a PMCJ campaigner from the Mindanao.  “We challenge President-elect Duterte to take this further, beyond a review, and make it a priority of Presidency to issue an Executive Order suspending plans, permits and construction of new power plants in the country.  Mindanao is host to many of the 27 new coal fired power plants currently in the pipeline.  “
Ms. Pines Arcega, convenor of Defend Zambales and a PMCJ anti-coal campaigner in one of the frontline communities from Luzon, echoed this challenge.  “A review of energy policy and harmonization of regulations on new and existing coal plants is not enough.  Our communities, our country, have suffered enough. Government should act immediately to put a stop to dirty energy.  We need an executive order for a moratorium on new coal plans and coal mines in place in the first 100 days of the new administration.

References :
MR. IAN RIVERA – 09174746178
MR. ROLDAN GONZALES – 09177109784
MS. PINES ARCEGA – 09321747583

 

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[Event] MinesWEEPerr: A Forum on Mining and Climate Justice -UPCSSC/SPARK/PMPI

MinesWEEPerrMinesWEEPerr: A Forum on Mining and Climate Justice on January 23, 2-5pm,
at the NIGS Auditorium (National Institute on Geological Sciences)

This event is co-presented by
UP College of Science Student Council
SPARK – Samahan ng Progresibong Kabataan
Philippine Misereor Partnership Incorporated

In partnership with
Iuvenis Orbis Geological Fraternity
UP Geological Society
UP Geology Majors’ Society

Also brought to you by
UP College of Mass Communication Student Council
UP Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Society
UP College of Human Kinetics Student Council

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[Press Release] Ahead of the Paris summit, Filipinos join the Global Climate March to demand climate justice

Ahead of the Paris summit, Filipinos join the Global Climate March to demand climate justice

Photo by Greenpeace Ph

Photo by Greenpeace Ph

MANILA, 28 November 2015 – Around 10,000 advocates representing climate-impacted communities, religious groups, youth, labor unions, anti-coal and renewable energy campaigners, and other concerned citizens took to the streets to join the Global Climate March on the weekend before the Paris talks begin.

The Filipino marchers set out a call for climate justice in behalf of vulnerable nations like the Philippines, and to demand a strong, fair and ambitious global climate agreement ahead of the international UN climate talks that will start on Monday, November 30.

The Global Climate March consists of 60 other major marches, plus more than 2,300 events, in over 150 countries on the eve of the 21st Conference of Parties (COP21) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). In the Philippines, communities across Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao are holding a week of actions for climate justice from November 23 to 30, with 20,000 people expected to join.

In Quezon City alone, six marches carrying climate-related themes – Energy Transformation; Right to Food, Land and Water; Justice and Reparations for Affected Peoples; Protect our Common Home (after Pope Francis’s encyclical Laudato Si); Jobs and Just Transition, and Youth – were set out in major roads in Quezon City and converged at the Quezon Memorial Circle.

Calling COP21 a ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ opportunity to take action, the climate marchers called on world leaders to enact a bold and meaningful agreement that pursues the following demands:

  • Address the urgency of the climate crisis with decisive, just, fair and ambitious actions nationally and globally
    Pursue transformation of energy systems –no to dirty and harmful energy; shift to clean and renewable energy for people and communities
    Protect peoples’ rights to food, water and the commons
    Guarantee the rights of all people and communities; deliver justice and address the impacts of climate including those particular to women and indigenous communities
    Ensure a just transition for workers and communities
    Deliver climate finance needed to empower people to deal with climate impacts, loss and damage and make the transition to sustainable development pathways
    Reject false solutions
    Set global targets for mitigation actions to keep temperature rise below 1.5 degrees; ensure equitable and fair sharing of mitigation actions among countries and within countries; deliver urgent short terms actions.
    The Philippines, a tropical archipelago besieged by an average of 20 storms yearly, is one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change. In recent years it has been experiencing significant climate change impacts such as super typhoons and other extreme weather events when the average global temperature rise reached 0.8⁰C above pre-industrial levels.

Recently, the UK Meteorological Office announced that this 2015, the world experienced global temperature increase of up to 1⁰C above pre-industrial levels.

In November 2013, super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) claimed more than 6,000 lives and left thousands more homeless and without livelihood. Yolanda also wrought over USD 14 billion in economic damages.

The Philippines pledged to reduce its emissions by 70% by 2030 in its Intended Nationally Determined Contribution submission to the UNFCCC, but this pledge is conditional on international climate finance and other support. The groups said that the Philippine government should not only offer conditional pledges but should also offer unconditional targets based on its fair share of the global efforts. However, the Aquino administration is approving the construction of more than 50 coal-fired power plants in the next few years.

The March for Climate Justice movement says that the main onus is on developed countries. The groups also stated that developing country governments should also deliver on their fair share and be firm in demanding climate finance from developed countries in order to do more mitigation actions.

###

Notes to editors:
For the list of participating organizations and other details, go to http://bit.ly/1kX3SB1
For high-resolution photos of the march, go to http://bit.ly/1Ov0iHE

For more information, contact:
Bro. Angel Cortez, OFM, Ecological Justice Interfaith Movement
Email: xerangel@yahoo.com Mob: +639177759343

Denise Fontanilla, Asian Peoples’ Movement on Debt and Development
Email: dmfontanilla@gmail.com Mob: +639178514890

Chuck Baclagon, 350.org East Asia Campaigner
Email: chuck@350.org Mob: +639272412743

Angel Pago, Greenpeace Media Campaigner
Email: apago@greenpeace.org Mob: +63998-9595785

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[Press Release] Filipino Youth in fear of a Possible Doomsday with a No Deal Scenario in Paris, held a Funeral March at the Climate Justice Rally -DAKILA

Filipino Youth in fear of a Possible Doomsday with a No Deal Scenario in Paris,
held a Funeral March at the Climate Justice Rally

Photo by DAKILA

Photo by DAKILA

Thousands of Filipinos marched for climate justice today, March 28, and converged at the Quezon City Memorial Circle. Broad groups of social movements, religious groups, trade unions, farmers, urban poor and NGOs took part in the Climate March carrying climate related issues – energy transformation; right to food, land and water; justice and reparations for affected people; protecting our common home (from Laudato Si); jobs and just transition; and carbon emissions reduction.


For the artist-activist group Dakila, the climate march is crucial in ensuring that the world listens to the voice of the Filipino youth who fears for their very own survival when no deal is sealed at the COP21 in Paris. Youth members of Dakila, differing from the general festive theme of the assembly, held a funeral march carrying with them images of their own gravestone inscribed with their own epitaph. Inscribed in their gravestones are their own photos, date of birth and their projected death in 2025.

According to Dakila spokesperson and Climate Revolution Campaigner, Stephanie Tan, “The global warming forecasts warned that in 2025, global temperatures are projected to increase by 2% if nothing is done to prevent global warming. This will result to sea level rise, warming of the oceans, intense heat waves, unpredictable weather patterns that will affect lives, livelihood and our way of life. The Earth has came close to a tipping point and if we don’t act on this now, the survival of humanity is at stake.”

Renee Karunugan, Communications Director of Dakila and dubbed by The Guardian as one of the young climate campaigners to watch out for at the COP21, has been tracking the negotiations. “Many countries in the ASEAN region are vulnerable to climate change. The Philippines, for example, has been experiencing extreme weather events that claim thousands of lives every year. The success or failure of Paris will largely depend on how much countries are willing to commit. This is an issue mostly of developed countries who want to commit — but not too much, just enough to say they have signed an agreement to act on the climate crisis.” Renee said.

Renee further added, “But this is not the time to commit half-heartedly, this is the time to commit to the strongest actions we can do to solve the climate crisis. Sure, there are already climate impacts which we can no longer solve but deciding to act today will lessen other potential, graver impacts we have to face in the future. For developing countries, climate change is a matter of survival. A failure of a strong commitment in Paris means taking away our right to live.”

Last year, in commemoration of the 1st anniversary of the landfall of Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, Dakila joined the 40 day, 1,000 kilometer Climate Walk from Kilometer Zero Luneta in Manila to Ground Zero Tacloban with former Climate Change Commissioner, Yeb Saño. This year, two Dakila members, musician Nityalila and visual artist AG Saño, have also joined the People’s Pilgrimage for the Planet, which traveled by foot from Rome, Italy to Paris, France in time for the COP21. The pilgrimage reached Paris today.

Nityalila said, “The epic journey that started last year from Kilometer Zero Manila to Ground Zero Tacloban and this year from Rome, Italy to Paris, France, ended today. We have taken thousands of steps to reach this destination. We see this as our symbolic pledge to be more vigilant about our individual and collective carbon footprint, to participate more in the global conversations on climate change, and to remember that a small step today in the right direction will make waves in the future.”

“However, our real destination is not Paris but as what Yeb Saño said, the hearts and minds of the people. We bring to the COP21, stories of how climate change affects real people, and world leaders meeting for the COP21 should know that whatever action they take will affect millions of lives in developing countries like the Philippines”, Nityalila added.

Dakila’s symbolic gesture at the March for Climate Justice registers the fear of Filipino youth for a possible doomsday scenario in 2025. The chilling effect of the projections in 2025 prompted vulnerable sectors like the youth to fear the death of their future. “What will happen to us? At an age when we are just building our lives, we will be faced with catastrophic challenges beyond our control”, said Floyd Tiogangco, a 20-year-old fresh graduate who participated in the funeral march. Floyd will just be 30 years old in 2025. “I am afraid that in 10 years, all that I have worked for will be wasted. They say the Philippines is extremely vulnerable in the ravage of climate change. I live in a low-lying area where an increase in the sea level will bring floods that will wash away my home.”

Climate Reality leader and Dakila’s Campaigns Director, Micheline Rama, who has come to Paris to join the global actions for climate justice shared, “Two years after super typhoon Haiyan wreaked havoc in the poorest regions of the Philippines, the conscious global unity pushing for climate justice — instead of charity — has been waning. In the Herculean task of forgetting the things tragically lost, the trudge for international accountability via a fair, equitable, and binding global agreement on climate change by 2015 must remain afloat in everyone’s minds. This can only be achieved through constantly reminding our current world leaders of the plight of disaster-vulnerable countries, of the many lives and livelihoods permanently marred by the negative effects of climate change.”

“ A flutter of a butterfly’s wings on one part of the planet may cause a tsunami on the other. When former world leaders did not bat an eyelash about scientists’ warnings about climate change years ago, they allowed for unimaginable consequences, which lashed more at developing countries with little capacity to avert disasters” Rama warned.

As a creative campaigning organization Dakila has been involved in the fight for climate justice since 2009 together with international organization Oxfam. It has gathered celebrity and artist advocates in creating awareness on climate change and its impacts. Among its roster of celebrity advocates are Up Dharma Down vocalist Armi Millare; pop culture icon Lourd de Veyra; internet celebrity Ramon Bautista; fashion designer and London-based musician Kate Torralba; rockstars Buhawi Meneses of Parokya ni Edgar, Ebe Dancel, Aia de Leon and Rico Blanco; Asia’s Got Talent hosts Marc Nelson and Rovilson Fernandez; celebrity chef and socialite Stephanie Zubiri; Kiko Machine cartoonist Manix Abrera; rapper Gloc 9; jewelry designer Joyce Makitalo; filmmakers Jim Libiran, Dante Garcia, Tara Illenberger and Ditsi Carolino; actors Ronnie Lazaro, Tuesday Varga, Ping Medina and Alessandra de Rossi; photographers Veejay Villafranca and Raffy Lerma; and former beauty queen Miriam Quiambao.

“By engaging celebrities, artists, lifestyle influencers, Dakila has been building an arena where art meets science, film meets social reality, where public discourse on how we can bring solutions to climate change are welcome, where we can be catalysts of change.” Rama added.
One of the Philippines top musician and Dakila Vice-President, said “We can no longer deny the impacts of climate change to our people. Climate change is not just about the environment. It is ultimately about people. We can no longer count the amount of losses and damages we have incurred because of climate change and we are seeking for justice. Climate change has stripped our people of their dignities and rights. It is only fitting that those who have caused climate change must be held responsible for their actions.”

“This convergence of civil society, youth, students and teachers, government, religious groups, artists and individuals for the March for Climate Justice, only shows that the Philippines clamor for climate justice.” Cabangon added.

The funeral march staged by Dakila ended at the Quezon City Memorial Circle where members laid down the mock up tombstones with their epitaphs, lighted candles and offered flowers to symbolize their grief over the grave situation of the future of their generation. A eulogy was read. It mentioned the phrases, “In loving memory of our future, in loving memory of our planet, in loving memory of humanity.”

Dakila spokesperson Stephanie Tan, in ending, said, “Our dramatic depiction of this doomsday scenario expresses our message of grief that we have come to this point in time where our very future is threatened by climate change. But it also expresses our collective anger and passion that we will not succumb to a future that sows fear to our people every time a typhoon hits our land. We refuse to accept that suffering from devastation is a fact of life. We refuse to surrender the dignity of life of our people. We refuse to yield powerless against climate change. A better world is possible.”

“We are a nation of heroes. We are those who refuse to suffer another Haiyan, and other catastrophic effects of Climate Change. We need to fundamentally change the way we live and the way the system works in our planet. We are waging a Climate Revolution.” ##

http://www.climaterevolution.ph
http://www.dakila.org.ph

PRESS RELEASE
Dakila
28 November 2015
Press Contact: Rash 09178638055

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[Press Release] Caravan against coal energy reaches Manila; requests dialogue with PNoy

Caravan against coal energy reaches Manila; requests dialogue with PNoy

Photo by PMCJ

Photo by PMCJ

Various coal-affected communities sail to Malacanang to demand cancellation of all coal projects

300 residents of coal-affected communities from Luzon and Visayas staged protests in government offices and in Malacanang as they ended their five-day caravan on November 27 urging the government to stop all coal projects in the country.

The communities who joined the People and Environment Against Coal-based Energy (PEACE) Caravan took off on November 23 from Sumirara Island in Caluya, Antique and made several stops at various coal hotspots in Luzon such as Occidental Mindoro, Batangas, and Laguna. They were joined by other activists from Bataan and Zambales who separately began their caravan from different coal sites in these provinces.

Led by the Philippine Movement for Climate Justice (PMCJ), the protest caravan organized forums and dialogues with various local government offices in cities and municipalities en route to raise awareness of the impact of coal to their communities. Among its stops were the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) and Department of Energy (DOE) offices.

The protest caravan comprised of farmers, fisher folk, local leaders, and environmental advocates from communities affected by coal projects as well as members of the anti-mining groups Archdiocesan Ministry on Environment (AMEN), Alyansa Laban sa Mina (ALAMIN), No to Coal Quezon Coalition, Bukluran ng Manggagawang Pilipino (BMP).

The protesters were also joined by members of the AlyansaTigil Mina (ATM), Aniban ng Manggagawa sa Agrikultura (AMA), Mining Workers for Environment Association (MWEA) and Philippine Misereor Partnership Inc. (PMPI).

Cancel all coal projects

“The residents affected by coal projects want to highlight the impact of coal not only to the people but also to the environment and natural resources,” said Gerry Arances, national coordinator of PMCJ. “They want the government to stop all coal projects in the country, either existing or those in the pipeline.”

Arances added that the government should issue a moratorium as well as conduct investigations, assessments, and evaluations to eventually rescind all permits on coal projects.

At present, there are 19 existing coal-fired power plants operating across the country. The administration of President Bengino S. Aquino III has allowed for another 20 more to be operational by 2020. More coal-fired power plants, hence, entailed the increase of coal mining projects to 118 by 2012.

“We extend this call for energy transformation to the governments of the world who will talk in the climate talks in Paris,” said Arances. “Responding to climate change is impossible without system change in energy and in our paradigm of development and the economy.”

“We urge the government, especially the president, to immediately act on our concerns on the persisting environmental destruction caused by mining operations,” demanded Sanlakas president Leody de Guzman.

“Large swaths of marine ecosystems have already been destroyed around islands in Luzon and many people have suffered illness due to pollution from coal mining activities,” de Guzman explained.

The real cry of the people

To end the country’s dependence on coal, PMCJ lead Convenor Lidy Nacpil said that it is imperative for the government to invest in clean and sustainable energy projects. “While the cheap cost of coal is always emphasized by the President, coal projects have already shown serious and ongoing health and environmental problems that the government needs to address,” Nacpil explained.

“Governments of other countries have already moved away from coal, as one of the top 5 most vulnerable countries, we should take a stand against this costly and deadly resource which worsens the climate crisis,” Nacpil, who also serves as the Coordinator for the Asian People’s Movement on Debt and Development (APMDD) explained.

The government has so far approved a total of 682 renewable energy projects with a potential generating capacity of 13,574.68 MW. Meanwhile, 242 more contracts are still pending for approval. “As the leader of one of the most vulnerable countries and a delegate in the coming climate talks in Paris, Aquino’s position must reflect the real cry of the people most affected by this coal-dependence.”

“We should see more significant effort on the part of our government to reduce carbon emissions and take the path to sustainable and clean energy,” said Edward Hagedorn, former Mayor of Puerto Princesa, where an upcoming coal project threatens what was hailed as among the Seven Natural Wonders of the World.

“But also, we must do it for the people whose lives and livelihoods are being threatened and destroyed by coal,” Hagedorn said. “The people who are protesting are those who rely on tourism, fisheries and agriculture to survive, we cannot allow dirty energy to condemn them to poverty.”

The PEACE Caravan will next head to the March for Climate Justice the next day, November 28, where they will be joined by a large crowd of support from various sectors to register the people’s demands in the Paris Climate Talks.

###

Participating organizations: PMCJ, CBCP-NASSA, Bulig Visayas, Power for People (P4P), Alyansa Tigil Mina (ATM), SAPOFFA, ALAMIN, AMEN, Bukluran ng Manggagawang Pilipino (BMP), Arcdiocesan Ministry on Environment (AMEN), No to Coal Quezon (NTCQ), Nuclear Free Bataan Movement (NFBM) and Defend Zambales.

Supported by: Bantay Kalikasan, World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Greenpeace, Bantay Kita

PRESS RELEASE
November 27, 2015

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[Literary] Empty Basket?! by Kalayaan

Empty Basket?!
by Kalayaan

from the margin

This is Earth- life bearing planet in universe
Which can only sustain life forms and hone?
this our home, shaped like a spherical dome
where our ancestors from million years was born;
lived in harmony with among other creatures

traversing seas that connects huge continent
Flowing Nile River overflowed with jaded fishes
human civilization was born in caves and stones
Hid and hone in the rocky corals in sea floors
thickly cemented turtles and crabs afloat

Forest lands that shelter small and tiny species crawl
swamps and ponds formed from sprinkled mist
aged trunks of forest in Negros and Cordillera region
Monkey eating eagles used to soar high from tree tops
Where freedom sought to reach a longest mile

Where are the tiny birds that used to sing in mango tree?
We used to see those in sketchy streets in Limay, Bataan
It was before they install Coal plants, a huge chimney
where fly ashes covered by smoke the whole town and city,
they made all these in the name of progress and development

We cut trees in order to build furniture for the first world,
Logging has stormed our mountains and turned it into wasteland
We are so generous to give up our defenses from typhoons
We exchanged hope with hauling tons of our sovereign lands
Then we recite our national anthem with candor and pride?

Nothing beats how human being catches water in dikes
In energy technology, we were able to send light to every house
Streets are no longer empty dark ditch of the night
all this free of any charges from waters and seas
human intellect harnessed nature to serve mankind!

Lo’, how corporations transformed empty streets and houses?
of piled up hunted haven of unpaid bills from electricity?
Malls build like mushrooms grow in heart of the City
That even threatened to cut the pine trees in Baguio City
They cleaned up old legend trees for highways

We boast our big dam that catches water into energy bin
We use taxes to invite Spanish blood of foreign origin
To use this dam, and forget the ancestral land of Lumads
Militarized Lumads has to flee for their lives from stray bullets
Mindanao our food basket, are we so glad?

The haven you called is now plantation economy
of first class, pine- apple, palm oil, banana, asparagus
which will be delivered into the plates of abroad
this thousands deal of hectares of land is dedicated
to feed Filipino people of amount of huge poverty!

Our seas and waters are playground of big fishing ships
who plundered marine resources and left us with garbage
they substitute our internal waters from which we own
into international waters free for all traders and financiers!
an empty basket was left for fisher folk in their daily throng!

It is long overdue the call for people to stand for what is right
private profit is here to plunder and extract wealth to its might
clean energy in coal plants claims – will become burial grounds!
not unit we stand as one, marching for our sovereign rights
reclaiming life, environment and future away from insatiable elites!

(For November 28, world march for climate justice!)

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[Campaign] Support for the March For Climate Justice Activity on November 28 by participating in our thunderclap campaign -ATM

Support for the March For Climate Justice Activity on November 28 by participating in our thunderclap campaign

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Good day everyone!

We would like to ask for your support for the March For Climate Justice Activity on November 28 by participating in our thunderclap campaign.

Thunderclap is a “crowdspeaking” platform that lets individuals and companies rally people together to spread a message. This will amplify our tweets and facebook posts for our November 28 activity. All you have to do is log in to your facebook and twitter accounts and click support via twitter and facebook in the thunderclap page.

We still have 5 days left to have complete the 100 sign ups so if you can ask your friends to do the same, that would be great. 🙂

Here is the link po.

https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/34666-march-for-climate-justice-ph?locale=en

Maraming salamat po!

atm-logo
The ever increasing and ever intensifying storms that have wreaked havoc on the Philippines in the past decade are clear indications that the world has changed, and living with the spectre of extreme weather events has become a new normal for many people.

Communities are starting to make the connection between extreme weather and climate justice.

As one voice the Philippines would like to sound the alarm for urgent climate action by gathering in various parts of the Philippines with our message that our survival is non-negotiable.

[From the web] 5 reasons why you should join the campaign for climate justice -climatejusticemarch.org

5 reasons why you should join the campaign for climate justice

Photo by March for Climate justice

Photo by March for Climate justice

Climate change is one of the greatest challenges humanity is facing today. Climate change is a consequence of the unnatural warming of the surface of our planet, due to excessive concentrations of greenhouse gases in the earth’s atmosphere. Since the start of industrialization, the average temperature of the surface of the earth has risen to nearly 1 degree Celsius. This warming is causing the destabilization of the earth’s climate systems with devastating consequences for people and all living things. Global warming and climate change are caused by humans and our energy and economic systems. We can prevent the situation from reaching greater catastrophic levels, and address its causes.

Now is the time to join hands, and bring together our collective strength, wisdom and power as Filipinos and join with people all over the world working for climate justice.

Read full article @www.climatejusticemarch.org

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[Press Release] PH groups launch climate justice march Call for strong climate deal in Paris

PH groups launch climate justice march
Call for strong climate deal in Paris

MANILA, 11 November 2015 — Social movements, religious associations, and other civil society groups across the Philippines have united to call for a strong and fair global climate agreement ahead of the international climate talks that will start on November 30.

March for Climate Justice Ph

The Paris talks, the 21st Conference of Parties (COP21), is expected to come out with a new international legally-binding agreement on climate change, in compliance with the UN Framework convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

The groups announced that they will hold a week of action for climate justice from November 23 to 30 across the country, which are all part of mobilizations across the world.

Actions include:
· A 20,000-strong “March for Climate Justice Pilipinas” on Nov. 28 at the Quezon Memorial Circle in Metro Manila, the highlight of the week;
· A Nov. 26-28 caravan across Luzon coal hotspots, from Semirara island in Antique to Quezon and Batangas, going to Manila;

· A Nov. 29 march led by the Archdiocese of Manila to Rajah Sulayman Park, across Malate Church, followed by an ecumenical service and a Catholic mass;

· A Nov. 30 Bonifacio Day mobilization by labor groups which will include a call for climate justice; and

· Various actions in between in Tacloban, Iligan, Metro Cebu, Davao, General Santos, Malaybalay, Ozamis, Pagadian, and Tangub.
Haiyan and record global warming
The Philippines, a tropical archipelago besieged by no less than 20 storms yearly, is one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change. In recent years it has been experiencing significant climate change impacts such as supertyphoons and other extreme weather events when the average global temperature rise reached 0.8⁰C above pre-industrial levels.

Recently, the UK Meteorological Office announced that this 2015, the world experienced global temperature increase of up to 1⁰C above pre-industrial levels.

In November 2013, Yolanda (Haiyan) claimed more than 6,000 lives and left thousands more homeless and without livelihood. The super typhoon also wrought over USD 14 billion in economic damages.

Emissions cuts overdue from rich countries
Climate action targets pledged by over 140 countries in recent weeks in preparation for Paris indicate that the world is still headed for at least 3⁰C of warming, according to recent reports from the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the UN Environment Programme, and a broad group of civil society organizations across the globe.

“World governments, including ours, through their recent pledges are condemning again the faith of humanity in the face of climate change. A 3 to 4 degree world to us Filipinos is death. This is a fight for our survival and future. Either we change the system and seek climate justice or face our death,” said Gerry Arances, national coordinator of the Philippine Movement for Climate Justice.

The March for Climate Justice movement says that the main onus is on developed countries. The groups also stated that developing country governments should also deliver on their fair share and be firm in demanding climate finance from developed countries in order to do more mitigation actions.

“Pledges of the governments of the wealthy industrialized countries are far below their fair shares, based on their historical responsibility and capacity,” said Lidy Nacpil, coordinator of Asian Peoples’ Movement on Debt and Development and the Global Campaign to Demand Climate Justice. “They have also pledged very little in terms of finance for developing countries like the Philippines, contrary to their obligations enshrined in the climate convention.”

“Developed countries’ fair share are far beyond what is possible to do inside their countries, therefore, to fulfil their fair shares, they have to enable more actions in developing countries by delivering finance for mitigation,” Nacpil added.

Philippine mitigation pledge vs. coal plans
The Philippines pledged to reduce its emissions by 70% by 2030 in its Intended Nationally Determined Contribution submission to the UNFCCC, but this pledge is dependent on international climate finance and other support. The groups said that the Philippine government should not only offer conditional pledges. It should also offer unconditional targets based on its fair share of the global efforts.

“Aksyon Klima supports the Philippine INDC position but calls on the government to show seriousness on the targets by defining the extent of what the country can do on its own and what more can be done when enabled. Marching orders should be issued to all agencies to adjust plans, projects, programs and activities, with the meaningful consultations and participation of all stakeholders, to make sure that we are on target by 2030,” said Ruel Cabile, Aksyon Klima Pilipinas national coordinator.

It should be noted that the Aquino administration is approving the building of more than 50 coal-fired power plants in the next few years.

“The Philippines sits at a crossroads. Do we veer away from expensive and dirty fossil fuels and make use of our locally-abundant renewable energy resources? Or do we continue with a business-as-usual mindset and continue contributing to the global temperature increase?” asked Joel Palma, president and CEO of WWF-Philippines.

Carbon majors also liable
The groups are also holding the fossil fuel industry accountable for climate change. Fifty companies dubbed as the world’s “carbon majors” — including Chevron, ExxonMobil, BP, Royal Dutch Shell, and ConocoPhillips — are a subset of the 90 legal entities that have contributed the lion’s share of cumulative global carbon dioxide and methane emissions in the Earth’s atmosphere, as identified by peer-reviewed research.

“The fight against climate change and the fight for the protection of human rights are two sides of the same coin. We have to remind these big polluters that their carbon emissions are affecting vulnerable countries like the Philippines. They should be held liable for endangering the lives and livelihoods of the present and future generations,” said Anna Abad, Climate Justice Campaigner for Greenpeace Philippines.

“We hope that the Commission on Human Rights take the bold step in pursuing a full and immediate investigation against those responsible, in the interest of justice, for the protection of our basic human rights,” Abad added.

Faithful asked to ‘protect our common home’
The Catholic Church is a strong champion in the climate justice movement especially with Pope Francis’s encyclical “Laudato Si.” Catholic and other religious groups in the Philippines and around the world have created coalitions and released statements in response to the Pope’s challenge for the faithful to “heed the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.” Clergy and laypeople alike will be at the frontlines of several of the above-mentioned mobilizations, joining other activists and sectors.

“Pope Francis has always insisted on the need to come up with a common plan that would address the issue of climate change. The time to act is now. What is needed is a strong political will that is geared towards the protection of our common home,” said Fr. Dexter Toledo, national coordinator of the Ecological Justice Interfaith Movement.

“It’s hard to get our heads around the reality that we intelligent, generally well-meaning people are hell-bent on destroying the future for our children. Hopefully the climate justice movement will wake us up from this nightmarish trance before it’s too late,” added Fr. John Leydon, a convenor of the Global Catholic Climate Movement.

CONTACTS:
Arvin Buenaagua, Philippine Movement for Climate Justice
vin.buenaagua@gmail.com
+639156140703

Denise Fontanilla, Asian Peoples Movement on Debt and Development
dmfontanilla@gmail.com
+639178514890

Chuck Baclagon, 350.org
chuck@350.org
+639272412743

Angelica Pago, Greenpeace
angelica.pago@greenpeace.org
+639989595785

Brother Angelito Cortez, Ecological Justice Interfaith Movement
xerangel@yahoo.com
+639177759343

Gregg Yan, WWF-Philippines
gyan@wwf.org.ph

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[Featured site] Ecological Justice Interfaith Movement Facebook page

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ECOJIM FB

Protect our common home, unite towards ecological justice!

Armed with these necessary tools, the Ecological Justice Interfaith Movement boldly urges relevant institutions of all creeds and all countries to unite towards a renewed appreciation of our common role as stewards of the environment and keepers of our neighbors.

We enjoin the people of developed countries of the North to heed the call of the brothers and sisters in the developing South: to base their commitment to cut emissions and fund climate justice efforts on a centralized, historically-responsible assessment of their vast contributions to the ecological crisis.

We enjoin the Philippine government to side and stand in solidarity with the poor, vulnerable communities it claims to represent. It must not use the faith and resilience of character Filipinos have to justify its shortcomings in responding to their need for food, land, water and livelihood, as well as just adaptation measures.

The Philippine government must also be the leader in holding developed countries accountable for their environmental faults, not settling for loans and rhetoric but just reparations for the damage the country continually sustains.

Finally, we demand all governments of the world, as well as international funding institutions to stop investing on fossil fuels and begin the transition to a more sustainable, more ecologically-responsible and socially just renewable energy system.

The path to deliverance always begins with the admission of faults, justice and a renewed paradigm. This is also true in the context of ecological justice. Whether in small acts in our community or in the systemic ways of life we utilize as nations and as a species: our beliefs, our faith must reflect in our actions. Through this, we preserve not only our own integrity, but the integrity of the rest of creation.

Protect our common home!
Preserve the integrity of creation!
Unite towards ecological justice now!

Referrence:
Fr. Dexter Toledo
ECOJIM Chairperson
09173196906

Visit and like ECOJIM at:
https://www.facebook.com/ecohymn/?fref=ts&ref=br_tf

[Event] March for Climate Justice Pilipinas -ECOJIM

March for Climate Justice

March for Climate Justice

For the past several years the Philippines has been battered by one mega-typhoon after another, a phenomenon that has rendered it as among nations that are ‘most vulnerable” to the impacts of climate change.

The stakes are high. The opportunity for change has never been brighter, the risks of inaction never darker. During the U.N. climate talks in Paris, world leaders need to hear loud and clear that our survival is non-negotioable. It is up to us to make it happen sooner rather than later.

Join the Peoples March for Climate Justice on November 28.

Visit and like March for Climate Justice Pilipinas @www.facebook.com/climate.justice.march

or join the event, register @www.facebook.com/events/1161363050546614/

https://www.facebook.com/events/1161363050546614/

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[Event] ECO-WALK 2015 by ECOJIM

ECO-WALK 2015
ECOJIM

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ECO-WALK is our concrete response to Pope Francis’ invitation to care for our common home which is the main theme of a national conference on integrity of creation, human rights and climate justice at Asilo de San Vicente de Paul. This resulted to the formation of Ecological Justice Inter-Faith Movement (ECOJIM).

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As you very well know, the Holy Father Pope Francis has issued an encyclical “Laudato Si” to encourage all of us to care for our common home – Mother Earth. This coming October 4, 2015, Feast of St. Francis, ECOJIM together with various religious groups will hold an ECO-WALK to dramatize its call for ecological justice. Participants will be coming from four assembly points representing the four elements (Earth, Wind, Water and Fire) and will later converge at the Quezon Memorial Circle.

The assembly will begin at 6am with the celebration of the Holy Mass and will march to QMC by 8am. A brief program until 12noon will be held at the Amphitheater of QMC.

We would like to invite you and your group to join us in our march for ecological justice. Let us make this as our way of expressing our gratitude to the Holy Father for Laudato Si and for visiting the Philippines when we ourselves have suffered the effect of climate change due to Typhoon Yolanda.

The details of the program will be relayed to you by one of our contact persons. For inquiries and confirmation of attendance, please call (02) 373-2973 or email us at ecojim.sect@gmail.com.

Confirm your attendance @https://www.facebook.com/events/849154018537413/

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

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