Tag Archives: VAW

[Press Release] Women’s Groups Collectively Call for Justice and a Stop to Violence -WMW

Women’s Groups Collectively Call for Justice and a Stop to Violence

Two days before the world marks the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women (VAW), over five hundred (500) women protested this morning, at Welcome Rotonda in the boundary of Quezon City and Manila.

Women leaders belonging to the World March of Women – Pilipinas donned Ang Probinsyano outfits to denounce the denial by the Philippine National Police (PNP) that the sex-for-freedom scheme is not a widespread practice in the institution. “Especially in urban poor areas, there has been no let-up in government’s war on drugs through nightly executions since Duterte came to power in 2016,” said Ana Maria R. Nemenzo, National Coordinator of WomanHealth Philippines.

“Despite PNP’s denial, the sex for freedom scheme of the PNP is unsurprising given their commander-in-chief’s misogynistic attitude that aggravates the normalization of sexual violence in Filipino’s everyday culture. Meanwhile, state violence persists especially against human rights defenders, workers and their leaders, members of indigenous communities, women community leaders, and political activists who continue to expose and resist government’s total disregard of human rights,” added Jelen Paclarin, Executive Director of Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau (WLB).

Jean Enriquez, Executive Director of the Coalition Against Trafficking in Women – Asia Pacific (CATW-AP), assailed the widespread sexual abuse committed against women in exchange for life or liberty of their partners or their own person. “At least nine (9) women have come out in one psychological first aid session we conducted in a group of thirty (30), and they could not file charges because of the impunity shielding police officers who have committed murder or rape in the context of the president’s anti-war campaign,” according to Enriquez.

Lisa Garcia, Executive Director of Foundation for Media Alternatives (FMA), stated that “this violence, perpetuated by a patriarchal social structure and exacerbated by Duterte, translates to the online world as well.” She underscored that the same gender-based violence is alive and well in digital spaces and that it impacts women who express their thoughts, identities and sexualities on the internet, as well as human rights defenders who are willing to challenge misogyny online. “Duterte and his administration are trying to normalize a sexist and violent rhetoric that silences those speaking for women’s rights on digital platforms,” added Garcia.

Judy Miranda, Secretary General of Partido Manggagawa (PM), said that another kind of violence is ‘killing’ women—economic violence. “The poor in particular have to constantly pull the continually expanding ends to meet so that their families can survive economic violence,” stated Miranda.

Bernadette Ocampo of SENTRO said that the government has added insult to injury, with inflation at a high 6.4 to 6.7 percent, in approving an incredulously low P25 wage increase. “With a kilo of rice now costing P50, ordinary vegetables which have been the poor’s daily fare now priced at an average of P100 a kilo, galunggong, the so-called poor man’s food, reaching P150 a kilo, and basic jeepney fare at P9, daily survival has become a cruel struggle,” emphasized Ocampo.

Amparo Miciano, Secretary General of Pambansang Koalisyon ng Kababaihan sa Kanayunan (PKKK) stated that violence is also inflicted daily on the lives of small farmers, indigenous peoples, and rural communities by corporations that take away their lands, extract resources, and destroy their environments.

“Violence is a risk that hundreds of thousands of women have been taking and many experience when they migrate for work, especially as domestic workers, internally or abroad, for lack of economic opportunities and decent work in their immediate communities,” lamented Ellene Sana, Executive Director of Center for Migrant Advocacy (CMA). “Poverty is violence; a life of dignity is everyone’s right, not just for those who can afford it,” Sana added.

The women’s groups announced that their series of activities during the 18 Days of Activism against VAW would culminate in protests also on Human Rights Day (Dec. 10) and Anti-Trafficking Day (Dec. 12).

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[Statement] Remember the Assault on Women during Martial Law Resist a Return to Tyranny -KAISA KA

Remember the Assault on Women during Martial Law Resist a Return to Tyranny

Kaisa kaThe Marcos fascist regime, which meant 14 years of terror to the Filipino people, inflicted some of the most inhuman state-sponsored violence against women (VAW) on the biggest number of Filipinas since WWII.  This should be one big reason for women and for men who honor their wives, mothers, sisters, aunts and grandmothers to oppose historical revisions about that era and resist a return to autocratic rule.

As we join the global 16 Days of Activism against VAW on its 25th year, KAISA KA, a women’s organization in the struggle for women’s emancipation and social change, deems it fit and timely to focus on state-sponsored violence against women.

Heinous forms of VAW

Most of the victims of violence during the dictatorship are in their senior years now and many have died.  Many women had passed away without fully disclosing their stories about gang-rape, rape using foreign objects like pistols, sexual battering and other harrowing experiences in the hands of soldiers, to whom the Marcos dictatorship has practically given license and privileges.  Most of these victims, though, have told their husbands, their best friends, their confidantes.

Victims of state-sponsored VAW during those dark years included not only women who were arrested and detained for being suspects of subversion but also young daughters of farmers that soldiers met in the barrios (rural barangays), women working in bars that soldiers frequented, even a few actresses that certain units of the military intelligence were attracted to and thus were declared as “suspected subversive elements.”

Soldiers subjected women visiting detained relatives to unnecessary frisking, oftentimes, while throwing obscenities or groping their private parts.  Some would peek at couples in conjugal enclosures.  Pregnant women were not spared.  And some interrogators threatened to rape girl-children of detainees being investigated if they do not “cooperate.”

In the rural areas, countless mothers suffered the anguish of seeing their children go hungry or not being able to feed them on time as soldiers would prevent the movement of supplies they bought from the town markets or would destroy their crops, accusing them of providing food stuff for rebels.

The list of the various forms of violence could be very long.  But most heart rending were the several cases of abduction of innocent children of suspected rebels.  Military detachments displayed these children for a while, a psychological ploy, ostensibly to prevent rebels from conducting attacks and to lure the parents to surrender.

A Reason for Alarm

It is alarming that for several months now, while President Duterte has drummed up total agreement and support for his war against drugs, creating a culture of fear and silence (to question and criticize), some people, especially in the social media were also actively spreading the so-called positive outcomes of martial law and extolling the “appropriateness” of a “strongman rule” for the Philippines. Even as he interspaced his comments with character

While he sounded during the presidential campaign like he was merely warning drug lords, dealers, pushers and users so that they could change, it has become clear that he was true to his byword: kill, kill, kill.   A day after his inaugural, the Duterte did not mince words when at San Beda College, he said, “Ang due process ay sa korte.  Hindi ninyo mahahanap yan sa akin.” (Due process is in the courts.  You cannot find it in me). In different occasions, he said, he does not care for human rights.

Alleged drug lords, dealers, pushers and users killed is now around 5,000.  Duterte however, bids for a longer time for his “war against drugs” because as he has his own list of suspects, he realized that more “nonhumans” have to be killed.  He is asking Congress to bring back death penalty and to lower the age of minors who could be charged criminally from the present 17 years old to 12-9 years old.  Not content with the present security forces, he has voiced his intent to build a gendarme, “something like the former Philippine Constabulary.”

All his critics from heads of States (US and the Vatican) to neophyte Senator Leila de Lima received a verbal thrashing adding character defamation and shaming for the Lady Senator and now echoed by his allies in a “super-majority Congress”.

He even threatened the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court about declaring martial law after she instructed judges in Duterte’s list of “drug personalities” to not surrender.  He apologized a few days afterwards but lately, he warned that if lawlessness escalates he would be forced to suspend the writ of habeas corpus.

As the killings are continuously desensitizing people, Duterte ushers in Ferdinand Marcos, Jr’s return and rise to power by introducing him in China as “the next vice president, if he wins his case against Vice President Leni Robredo” and by finally allowing the burial of the dictator Marcos in the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LNMB).

Clearly now, Duterte is heading towards a kind of rule that approximates martial law.

More reason for women to oppose tyranny

Open fascist rule in itself spells danger for women.  When even “rules of discipline” of the state security forces can be set aside in the name of “securing the state”, women become open prey of powerful sections that are licensed to kill.
.
A culture of rape-as-punishment being promoted now is ominous of how bad a Duterte fascist rule will be for women. Threatening to rape (and kill) women who question or criticize the president’s ideas and actions has not been as widely used as now and by the very persons promoting through the social media a pro-martial law/pro- strongman-rule culture and adulation of Duterte.  And the president, who never apologized for his ill remark on the rape of an Australian despite strong criticisms from here and from other parts of the world, has never issued a public censure to stop this culture of violence against women.  Instead, his speeches continue to mirror his own disrespect and low regard for women.

Misogynist Duterte could make a fascist rule doubly menacing for women. We should resist it now.

Oppose the return of tyranny!
No to all forms of violence against women!
Resist state violence against women!
——
KAISA KA
Pagkakaisa ng Kababaihan para sa Kalayaan
#22-A Libertad Street, Highway Hills, Mandaluyong City 1501, Philippines
Telefax: (02) 7173262                               Email: kaisa_ka98@yahoo.com
Website: http://www.kaisaka.org / http://www.kaisakakalayaan.org

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally
published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or
change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and
original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the
tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc

[Event] Women’s Access to Justice in the Age of Technology: corporate and domestic legal remedies for cases of ICT-related violence against women -FMA/WLB

Women’s Access to Justice in the Age of Technology: corporate and domestic legal remedies for cases of ICT-related violence against women

Information and Communications Technology (ICT)-related violence against women (VAW) is increasingly becoming part of women’s experience of violence and their online interactions. The harms and violations against women perpetrated through and within ICTs have been, for the most part, seen as trivial, receiving inadequate and inappropriate response from the different actors such as the state, the private sector, the civil society and even women themselves.

FMA
It is in this context that Foundation for Media Alternatives and Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau worked together on a research funded by the Association for Progressive Communications that examined the availability and effectiveness of existing domestic legal remedies for victim-survivors of ICT-related VAW and to prevent such violence. The research explored ICT-related VAW by mapping the existing domestic legal remedies and conducting case studies. Using access to justice framework, the research looked at ICT-related VAW as a product of a hierarchical system of oppression. It interrogated the intersectionality of discrimination women face whilst mindful of the continuum of violence experienced by women, and the continuum of agency and empowerment that women, both individually and collectively, exercised.

In line with this, we would like to invite you in the forum entitled, “Women’s Access to Justice in the Age of Technology: corporate and domestic legal remedies for cases of ICT-related violence against women” to present the result of the study. This will be held on 18 September 2014, from 1:00 – 4:00 pm at Fersal Hotel, Kalayaan Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City. We hope you can attend and engage in a meaningful discussion in relation to the findings of the study.

For more information call Tel. 435-6684.

ALAN ALEGRE
Executive Director
Foundation for Media Alternatives

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[Event] 18-Day Campaign to End Violence Against Women (VAW) 2013 -www.pcw.gov.ph

18-Day Campaign to End Violence Against Women (VAW) 2013

Theme:
End VAW Now! It’s Our Duty!
Monday, November 25, 2013 to Thursday, December 12, 2013

Since 2002, the Philippines has been actively joining the 16 days of activism against gender-based violence that is being observed globally from November 25 to December 10. Said campaign calls for the elimination of all forms of violence against women through awareness-raising about gender-based violence, strengthening local work and establishing a clear link between local and international work to end VAW, among other undertakings.

18-day-campaign-logo_0

In 2006, through Presidential Proclamation 1172, the Philippine campaign was extended to 18 days, to include December 12 which is known as the Anti-Trafficking in Persons Day.

This year, the country’s commitment to the observance was strengthened as President Benigno S. Aquino III signed the Republic Act 10398 declaring November 25 of every year as the “National Consciousness Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and Children.” The law also raises the standard by which this campaign is observed by mandating key agencies to undertake activities designed to raise public awareness on VAW.

With the theme: “End VAW Now! It’s Our Duty!” the call will emphasize the importance of having a functional mechanism, operated by competent and capable duty-bearers with a sense of responsibility and accountability originating from a deep understanding of the fundamental principles of gender-based violence and the provisions of VAW laws.

Read full article @www.pcw.gov.ph

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[Statement] Joint Statement of the ACWC and the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General on Violence against Children | SRSG on Violence Against Children

Joint Statement of the ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) and the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General on Violence against Children | SRSG on Violence Against Children.

 Manila, the Philippines -The ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) convened a Consultative Meeting with the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General on Violence against Children (SRSG-VAC) and CEDAW Committee experts on violence against women in Manila, the Philippines, on 16-17 January 2012. The Consultation was supported by UN Women and UNICEF.

Marta Santos Pais, Special Representative of the UN Sec Gen

The Consultation provided an opportunity to exchange views on a rights-based approach to initiatives designed to prevent and address all forms of violence against children (VAC) and violence against women (VAW), in the light of international human rights standards, in particular the Convention on the Rights

of the Child (CRC) and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), both ratified by all ASEAN Member States.

The Consultation helped to highlight good practices and experiences on the implementation of laws, policies and actions aimed at overcoming the invisibility of violence, promoting an integrated agenda for violence prevention and elimination, and improving the availability and quality of data and research on the magnitude and incidence of violence against children and violence against women.

The Commission welcomed the insightful information provided by the SRSGVAC on the process of follow-up to the recommendations of the UN Study on Violence against Children promoted in countries around the globe, and the experience gained from cooperation developed between her mandate and regional organizations and institutions aiming at building a world free from violence.

The Commission recognized the importance and potential of enhancing opportunities for dialogue and cooperation with strategic partners at the national, regional and international levels, including with the United Nations system, to accelerate progress towards the elimination of violence against children and

violence against women.

The Commission and the SRSG-VAC expressed commitment to pursue collaboration in the context of the ACWC’s mandate for the promotion and protection of the rights of women and children and efforts for violence prevention and response including within the framework of the Commission’s five-year workplan in the following activities:

a. Compiling, documenting and disseminating good practices and studies on the implementation of legislations, programmes, services and strategies to address all forms of VAW and VAC in the region;

b. Conducting regional studies of legal frameworks and response strategies towards the elimination of VAW and VAC in ASEAN Member States;

c. Promoting advocacy and policy development for the prevention and elimination of all forms of VAW and VAC;

d. Promoting, in collaboration with relevant government agencies, the availability and quality of data collection and analysis concerning VAW and VAC in ASEAN Member States;

e. Launching a regional public campaign to eliminate all forms of VAW and VAC in collaboration with the relevant ASEAN sectoral bodies, civil society, religious and local leaders, private sector and other stakeholders;

f. Developing minimum standards of delivery of services to the victims and survivors as well as perpetrators of VAW and VAC;

g. Strengthening the capacity of service providers in ASEAN Member States to prevent and address all forms of VAW and VAC; and

h. Promoting dialogues with other relevant government agencies, civil society and other stakeholders aiming at improving awareness of all forms of VAW and VAC in various sectors.

Source: srsg.violenceagainstchildren.org