Tag Archives: Teachers

[Statement] On world teachers’ day: Our new ‘front liners’ rush on preparations while Gov Mamba greeted them with criticisms-Assert

On world teachers’ day: Our new ‘front liners’ rush on preparations while Gov Mamba greeted them with criticisms-Assert

Instead of kind words for risking life and limb as they confront education in new normal, the teachers were greeted by ungrateful and irresponsible remarks of Governor Mamba. ‘Sumasahod lang, pero walang ginagawa,’ was the governor’s criticism.

No amount of explanation, which is not even a sincere apology, from Governor Mamba could appease the teachers. His display of insensitivity towards the teachers’ plight is a manifestation of how detached government officials are to the cries of woes and despair of teachers, the pillars of education who have been trying to build the eroded moral values of this society. No thanks to the culprits, the corrupt officials.

Teachers’ efforts are time and again been disregarded and push to the sidelines. This new normal brought us all to a radically changed education landscape that is bringing unimaginable toll on teachers. The governor’s remarks just show how detached he is to the realities on the ground. Teachers are on call 24/7 to respond to chat-groups of learners and parents and of their superiors. Unlimited messages of instructions and commands from their bosses any time of the day implicitly tell them that they are on call 24/7. The new ‘work from home’ arrangements for teachers had already taken most of their waking hours and rob them of their time for their families and themselves.

Six weeks since the announcement of the extension of the opening of classes, DEPED was still not able to deliver the essentials for blended learning. During DEPED’s press conferences and interviews, they showcase exemplary schools that do not represent the general situation on the ground.

The six weeks of the extension were spent on the non-essentials like bombarding teachers with so many webinars, despite the fact that most of these will not be used in blended learning. Most enrollees chose the modular approach and because the majority of learners do not have internet access. So for what are the endless webinars? Hence, after six weeks, the much-needed modules are still to be produced. This prompted teachers and school principals to find ways and means to produce urgently needed learning materials.

‘From front liners we become print liners,’ jokingly says Randy Alfon, a Bulacan teacher – leader. He and his co-teachers, just like the rest, rush their ‘printing jobs’ for modules and learning activity sheets or LAS.

Teachers could not even think of pausing to commemorate the World Teachers’ Day which happens to be on October 5. How could they? This past two weeks, they have been printing materials up to the wee hours of the morning. Teachers have been complaining of being ‘zombies’ with only four to five hours of sleep.

With no health insurance and health support, teachers are literally putting their lives at risk in performing their duties. The demand for mass testing for teachers was not heeded. Our basic demand for DEPED to address the gaps and inequalities in education new normal all fell on deaf ears making the ‘education for all’ slogan, just that, a mere slogan. So many of our learners especially the least privileged are still left behind. DEPED is content with the turnout of enrollees when they know damn well that this is not an assurance of access to education. Without the needed support to families that are not capable of performing home-assisted learning, education access will just remain a call and a goal.

Time and again we witness how DEPED fails us in extending needed support and services while we perform our duties and social responsibilities. Just like how this government fails its people in dealing with this pandemic crisis. Just like how it has been failing us as we battle with past disasters.

Thus, on the occasion of the World Teachers’ Day, it is with great resolve that we vow with utmost vigor to forward our issues and concerns. We resolve to join the collective voices of our people who, like us, are continually being displaced in this pandemic and are further disenfranchised by the government’s mis-priorities, inaction, and often anti-poor policies.

Let us not forget that all the rights we enjoy now are fruits of long years of struggle of our forebears in the teachers’ movement. Let us bear in mind that all the pro-teacher laws we invoke in claiming for what is ours are hard-earned victories. Not a single benefit was delivered to us in a silver platter.

Our years of world teachers’ day commemoration and our years of service as teachers should have already taught us that we only have ourselves to rely on. The likes of Governor Mamba and his league in the government once again brings the message that we can never count on them.

Thus, in this significant day, let us commit to all the more strengthen our unions and associations. It is the only one that would genuinely fight for our rights and welfare. It is the only one that could restore the dignity of the teaching profession.

Official Statement on World Teachers Day Reference: ARLENE JAMES PAGADUAN 0920 659 5863 National Chairperson October 5, 2020

assert_wtd2020_challenge #insensitive_mamba #october5_opening_still_not_ready #address_gaps_and_inequities_in_education_new_normal

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Statement] Consider the use of books and stop producing expensive modules -TDC

Consider the use of books and stop producing expensive modules

If it has been scientifically determined that modules should be the main delivery system replacing textbooks, there needs to be one standard method for creating them. We are supposed to have specialists and experts in the Central and Regional offices who should design them. But divisions are being compelled to draw Plan Bs as it becomes more and more clear that Central Office will not be able to deliver on time. Now, we have modules from the Central Office and modules from the divisions and even schools. Which one takes precedence then? This is not a simple “left hand not knowing what the right hand is doing”, the left-hand doesn’t know what it’s doing itself either! But the right hand isn’t doing so well either, leaving the burden now on who else, but teachers!

Realities on the ground are embarrassing. Schools produce their own modules and actually raise funds to be able to meet the requirements of DepEd. Some of our teachers now resorting to online solicitations— even barter. This is outright begging. Simple mendicancy. Still, many are forced to personally finance these modules- materials that are supposedly state-funded.

Yet, in the end, and 9 billion pesos later, the readiness of the system, even for the first quarter is proving to be but a myth. Because of this shortage, there are even reported cases of schools resorting to scheme where modules will be shared by two groups of learners. Based on a survey that we have conducted thru social media, most schools have ready materials only for the first two weeks up to the first month of the coming school year.

Recently, Secretary Leonor Briones herself stated in a news conference that the use of modules would have an impact on the environment and will put too many trees in danger aside from being very expensive. Of course, we want to see this pronouncement in terms of policies. We adjure the DepEd to use the printed books instead of modules and supply the necessary activity sheets or lesson guides (physical or digital). We, therefore, propose to halt further production of modules for the second quarter and the rest of the school year. And since many teachers claimed that they produced their own materials and actually spent for those, accounting for the initial fund allocation is needed.

Reference:
Benjo Basas, TDC National Chairperson

0923-0819750/ 0927-3356375

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Statement] Kung talagang gustong magbigay ng internet data allowance, dapat walang kondisyon -TDC

PAHAYAG
Setyembre 19, 2020

Kung talagang gustong magbigay ng internet data allowance, dapat walang kondisyon

Lahat ng guro ngayon ay nangangailangan ng internet. Hindi makagagampan sa mga tungkulin ang ating mga guro kung wala gadgets- desktop o laptop computer, tablet o smart phone. Kailangan mo rin ng printer at higit sa lahat, kailangan ng internet connection.

Hindi pa nagsisimula ang balik-eskuwela ay namuulubi na sa gastusin ang marami sa mga guro. Kailangang bumili ng sariling laptop o gadgets, kailangang magpakabit ng internet o kailangang mag-load para sa internet data at kailangang mag-load para i-text o tawagan ang mga mag-aaral at magulang.

Kaya naman, ikinatuwa natin ang ipinalabas na pahayag ng DepEd na magkakaroon ng “provision for monthly connectivity and communication expenses” para sa mga guro sa pamamagitan ng OUA Memo 0920-0124 na mula sa tanggapan ni Undersecretary Alain Pascua. Gayunman, hindi absoluto ang “incentive” na ito, bagkus may mga kondisyon. Halimbawa na lamang ay ang requirement na mag-activate sa DepEd Commons ang mga guro upang ma-qualify at ang pagtatakda ng deadline na hanggang sa Setyembre 21 na lamang.

Kung talagang sinsero ang DepEd na tulungan ang mga guro para makaagapay sa mga pagbabago at hamoon ng ‘new normal, mas mainam na ‘di hamak kung itutulak nila ang paglalaan ng Kongreso ng budget para sa libreng laptop at buwanang internet allowance para sa lahat ng guro. Marami nang mambabatas ang umayon sa panawagan nating ito, ang kulang na lamang ay ang paggigiit ng mismong pamunuan ng ating ahensiya.

Ano ba ang mayroon sa DepEd Commons at ipinagpipilitan ito sa mga guro? Hindi ba at kusa naman natin itong ginagamit? Kung papaanong kusa rin nating ginagamit ang anumang available online resources na alam nating makakatulong sa ating pagtuturo?

Laging paalala sa atin ng DepEd na dapat ay WALANG BATANG MAIIWAN, pero bakit sa kanilang mga programa ay MARAMING GURO ANG NAIIWAN?

#DapatAll #FreeLaptop #InternetAllowanceIbigay #WalangKondisyon

For details:
Emmalyn Policarpio, Secretary-General
0923-0819751

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Statement] Epekto ng MECQ sa pagbubukas ng klase sa Agosto 24 -TDC

Benjo Basas, National Chairperson, Teachers Dignity Coalition (TDC). Photo by Arnel Tuazon

Epekto ng mecq sa pagbubukas ng klase sa Agosto 24
Agosto 4, 2020

Ang muling pagsasailalim sa MECQ sa Metro Manila at ilan sa pinakamalalaking lalawigan ng Luzon ay may malaking epekto sa inaasahang pagbubukas ng klase sa Agosto 24. Dahil malilimitahan ang paggalaw ng mga mamamayan, hindi rin maisasaayos ang mga kinakailangang paghahanda lalo na sa mga gagamiting modules. Batay kasi sa inilabas na datos ng Department of Education (DepEd) kamakailan, ang modular modality ang isyang magiging pangunahing pamamaraan ng pagtuturo sa ating mga paaralan sa buong bansa. Isang malaking hamon ngayon ang kakaharapin sapagkat marami sa mga dibisyon sa bansa, kahit pa yaong mga hindi naisasailalim sa MECQ ay hindi pa handa ang modules na gagamitin ng mga mag-aaral at guro.

Sa ganitong kalagayan, kakailanganin ang pagpapasya ng DepEd at ang tulong na maaaring maibigay ng lahat ng sektor kung sakaling nanaisin pa ring maituloy ang pagbubukas ng klase sa buong bansa o sa anumang bahagi nito sa Agosto 24. Tandaan na matatapos ang MECQ sa Agosto 18 o anim na araw bago ang takdang pagbubukas ng klase,

Ang hinihiling namin sa pamunuan ng DepEd ay maging bukas sa pakikipag-usap sa mismong mga frontliners ng edukasyon, ang mga classroom teachers, alamin ang kanilang saloobin at kunin ang kanilang mga opinyon.

Kung sakaling tapat na makitang hindi uubra, ay huwag sanang ipilit ang pagpapatupad nito. Maraming produktong bagay ang maaaring magawa sa mga panahong wala pa ang klase- distance man o face to face. Gamitin natin ang panahon para matiyak na maisagawa ang mahusay na pagsasanay sa mga guro, oryentasyon sa mga magulang, produksiyon ng mga TV at radio lessons, pagpapaunlad sa modules at pag-iimprenta nito. May sapat na panahon din upang makuha ang kumpiyansa ng taong-bayan.

Higit sa lahat makapag-aambag ang DepEd sa pagsisikap ng lahat upang maiwasan pang lalo ang pagdami ng kaso ng COVID-19.

For details:
Benjo Basas, TDC National Chairperson
0927-3356375

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Statement] Reaksiyon ng TDC sa pahayag ng DEPED hinggil sa selected face to face learning

Reaksiyon ng TDC sa pahayag ng DEPED hinggil sa selected face to face learning

Isa lamang itong patunay na hanggang ngayon ay hindi pa lubos na nakalatag ang plano sa pasukan bagamat malapit na ang takda nitong magbukas. At sa aming palagay ay napakadelikado pa ng face to face classes sa mga lugar na mababa o kahit pa walang kaso ng COVID-19. Nakita na natin ito sa mga nakaraang polisiya na kung biglang magluluwag ay mae-expose sa pagkalat ng virus ang mga mamamayan gaya ng nging resulta ng balik-probinsiya program.

Ang mas dapat sanang tutukan ng DepEd at ng pamahalaan ay kung paano gagawing maayos ang mga pamamaraan para sa distance learning modality gaya ng online, radio/TV broadcast o maging ang modular approach. Lahat ng mga ito ay hindi pa rin handa hanggang sa kasalukuyan samantala isang buwan na lang at magbubukas na ang klase.

Sana naman bago ang mga pinal na pagpapasya hinggil sa class opening ay maikonsidera ang kahandaan ng sistema at ang kaligtasan ng mga bata, guro at lahat ng mga mamamayan.

For details:
Benjo Basas, National Chairperson
0927-3356375
Teachers’ Dignity Coalition
4443 BCL Homes, Independence St., Gen. T. De Leon Valenzuela City
Telephone (02) 6920-296 • Mobile: 0916-6126739
Email: teachersdignity@yahoo.com.ph • Website: http://www.teachersdignity.com

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Statement] Physical reporting of teachers, unnecessary, impractical -TDC

Physical reporting of teachers, unnecessary, impractical

After we have released the appeal to the Department of Education (DepEd) Secretary Leonor Briones to extend the work from a home arrangement for teachers yesterday, some of the schools that initially required their teachers to report physically on Monday canceled the order. Many of those field officials said that they will be waiting for the final order from DepEd, which means that teachers will continue to work from home until the release of a clear and uniformed instruction from the DepEd.

We appreciate such gestures from school heads and some field officials. We, however, call on the DepEd Central Office to respond to our formal query and appeal sent to the Office of the Secretary and some members of the DepEd Execom yesterday. In a critical moment like this, every instruction must be clear so as not to create confusion or ambiguity. This is beyond the tasks expected from us, but more so it concerns the health and safety of our teachers and the general public.

We are in the belief that requiring teachers to report to school beginning Monday, June 22 is unnecessary, impractical and will just place them and other people in a health hazard. As we have earlier said, all the tasks required from us during this period may be done at home and there is no need for physical reporting. The DepEd has to prove that the system is ready for distance learning modality- and if they require the teachers to report physically to render tasks that can be done distantly, it defeats the idea of virtual readiness.

Again, we call on Secretary Leonor Briones to order the field offices of DepEd from regions to schools to halt teachers’ reporting on Monday and extend the work from home arrangement until physical reporting is necessary and possible. Lastly, we reiterate our willingness to sit for a virtual even actual dialogue to shed light on this and other matters.

Reference:
Emmalyn Policarpio, Secretary-General
0926-3143106

For other details:
Benjo Basas, National Chairperson
0927-3356375

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Press Release] Mga guro nakiisa na sa panawagang payagan na ang pag-angkas sa motor -Ating Guro

Mga guro nakiisa na sa panawagang payagan na ang pag-angkas sa motor

Nakiisa na rin ang mga guro sa panawagang pahintulutan na ang pag-aangkas sa motor bilang alternatibong transportasyon sa panahon ng ‘new normal.’

Ayon kay JR Dona, Secretary-General ng ATING GURO Partylist, nagdudulot umano ng diskriminasyon ang pagbabawal sa pag-angkas sa motor lalo na sa panahong limitado pa ang pampublikong transportasyon. Ayon sa kanya, “Katulad rin ng mga simpleng manggagawa at kawani, marami sa mga guro natin- publiko man o pribado, sa lungsod man o kanayunan ay motor ang gamit na transportasyon kahit bago noong magdeklara ng mga community quarantine dahil sa pandemya. Sa tingin namin ay anti-poor ang polisiyang ito sapagkat ang mga may magagarang sasakyan ay hindi naman pinagbabawalan na bumiyahe kahit pa may mga pasahero.”

Hindi umano nila maunawaan kung bakit ipinagbabawal ang pag-angkas sa motor samantala malaking tulong ito sa mga manggagawa kahit pa sa gobyerno dahil nababawasan ang mga kailangang serbisyuhan ng libreng sasakyan.

“Ang problema nga dito ay hindi ka maaaring mag-angkas dahil umano sa physical distancing pero itinatambak naman nila sa mga truck na libreng sakay ang mga pasahero kung saan ay nagsisiksikan ang mga ito,” dagdag pa ni Dona.

Ayon naman sa Teachers’ Dignity Coalition (TDC) ay dapat umanong ikonsidera ng IATF na pahintulatan ang pag-aangkas para sa mga empleyado at guro na mag-asawa o magkakasama sa bahay pati na rin yaong mga nasa malalayong pook na salat sa transportasyon.

“Malaking bagay ito lalung-lalo na sa mag-asawang teacher na motor lang ang nakayanang bilhing sasakyan. Bakit aalalahanin ng IATF na magkahawaan ng virus sa pag-angkas samantalang magkatabi sila sa pagtulog at magkasabay kumain nang walang facemask?” Tanong ni Romel Lleva, guro sa Sorsogon at Deputy Secretary-General ng TDC. Dagdag pa niya, “Maliban sa mga mag-asawa, malaking tulong din ang motor o habal-habal sa mga guro na nakatalaga sa mga bundok at liblib na lugar na tanging ito lamang ang means of transportation.”

Ang pahayag ni Lleva ay nauna nang sinang-ayunan ni Nono Enguerra, guro sa Roxas High School, Maynila at pangulo ng TDC-NCR Teachers’ Union (TDC-NCRTU), ayon sa kanya, “Marami sa ating mga guro, lalo na ang mga mag-asawang nasa pareho o magkalapit na paaralan ay motor ang gamit na transportasyon. Paano na sila kung hindi papayagan ang angkas sa motor?”

“Sa NCR ay maraming guro na nakatira sa mga housing projects sa mga kalapit na bayan ng Laguna, Cavite, Rizal at Bulacan ay motor ang pinakamabilis at matipid nilang gamit, lalo na sa mga mag-asawa,” dagdag ni Enguerra.

Ayon sa mga guro, magiging malaking dagok ito sa kanila sapagkat bagamat wala pa umanong face to face learning ay may mga pangangailangan pa ring mag-ulat paminsan-minsan sa paaralan ang mga guro.

“Ang panawagan namin sa pamahalaan ay timbangin sana ang praktikalidad ng mga bagay na ito. Hindi kami tutol sa polisya kung pantay ang pagpapatupad at malinaw ang layunin, pero kung hindi naman ito lohikal at pahihirapan lamang ang mga mahihihrap, mas mainam pang huwag na itong ipatupad,” pagtatapos ni Lleva.

Pormal na iaapela ng TDC at ATING GURO ang usaping ito sa IATF ngayong linggo.

Para sa mga detalye:

Rommel Lleva, TDC Deputy Secretary-General/
President, TDC- Bicol Teachers’ Union (TDC-BCTU)
0906-1039165

Juanito JR Dona
ATING GURO Partylist Secretary-General
0965-5470700

Ildefonso Enguerra III
President, TDC-NCRTU
0908-1637529

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Statement] Stable internet connection: crucial in education new normal -ASSERT

Stable internet connection: crucial in education new normal

Building the needed internet infrastructure is crucial for education in the new normal to succeed.

DepEd is missing this point.

The sorry state of our internet connection is the number one hindrance in ensuring access and equity in education today. Gadgets and laptops, ICT tools, and webinars will only work favorably with stable wifi access. Even the much flaunted DepEd Commons is useless without a reliable internet connection.

To date, Philippine’s internet speed is at 15.1 Mbps while the global average is at 26.12 Mbps. We ranked 103rd out of 139 countries. Sixty-one percent (61%) of the 23 million households in the country have no internet access. Our current internet users already account for 43.5% of the total population. Add to this the bulk of the 27 million students of basic education and the almost one million teachers who will be forced to use the internet to access learning and resources. This is a very big volume of users. It is simply impossible for the current state of internet connection to accommodate. Imagine the internet traffic we will all be experiencing and its adverse effect on online learning and other internet-dependent facets of life and work.

Blended learning, with its so many missing details, just highlights the gap in education access. If you are poor, learn through radio programs and printed modules. If you have the means, enjoy easy access through online and digital tools. To date, DepEd Commons boasts of 7million subscribers. That is a mere 25.9% of the 27 million students of basic public education. Even if the disadvantaged learners are able to access online lessons they will just be left on their own. Their parents are at work during the day and they cannot afford to pay for tutors.

The goal of education and the government should be to electrify the countryside and build the needed internet infrastructure. They should target providing free wifi to barangays so all learner households could have online access. Targeting the schools could come later since the face-to-face mode is not encouraged. From here, it could come up with specific targets and timeframes until every barangay is electrified and has a strong internet connection.

All efforts and formula for education in the new normal will come to naught if the government does not decisively address this glaring need.###

#AddressClassDivideInEducation
#AdressGapsInEducationNewNormal
#InsureAccessToEducation

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Press Release] Teachers may need ‘internet’ allowance, local support -TDC

Teachers may need ‘internet’ allowance, local support -TDC

With the looming ‘new normal’ in education, the Teachers’ Dignity Coalition (TDC) asks the Department of Education (DepEd) for a sort of internet allowance to boost their existing cash allowance popularly known as “chalk allowance’ intended to for materials they use for teaching.

“With this drastic change in teaching and learning approaches, our teachers will need to upgrade their technological capacity and digital access,” said Ildefonso Enguerra III, a teacher in Roxas High School, Manila and the President of TDC-NCR Teachers’ Union (TDC-NCRTU), the TDC’s regional chapter in Metro Manila. “The DepEd may consider the provision of gadgets like laptop computers or tablets and internet access to our teachers,” he added.

Last week the DepEd announced that the cash or ‘chalk’ allowance in the amount if P3, 500 will be released sooner to all the teachers engaged in actual classes despite the earlier confirmation that there would be no face to face learning.

“That amount is only equivalent to P16.00 a day, but it would certainly help our teachers. But again, with online tasks continuously growing, we may need more funds to cope-up. Our experience in the first week of enrolment alone- where we were tasked to enlist the children online through social media, text messages and calls- shows that we will be needing more assistance to deliver the expected output of distance education,” Enguerra, who is also currently engaged in online classes revealed. The TDC said that a P1, 000 internet allowance per month, may not be enough but will be a great help for teachers.

The TDC, meanwhile commends the local government units that initially pledged their help to their constituents, teachers, and learners alike, including the cities of Pasig, Taguig, Manila and Quezon. These LGUs have pledged to provide gadgets to teachers and students or both.

“We appreciate all those initiatives, but we fear that if we leave it solely to the initiative of the LGUs, it will further widen the digital divide. These are highly urbanized cities and among the richest in our country, so obviously they have the capacity, while others do not,” Benjo Basas, the group’s national chairperson said.

Basas, however said that there is hope even in some localities outside the capital as proven by the Malolos City local school board (LSB), when Mayor Bebong Gatchalian and schools division superintendent Dr. Norma Esteban, co-chairs of the board agreed on the proposal of the City of Malolos Public School Teachers’ Association (COMPSTA) president Rommel Alcaraz for the provision of portable broadband, flash drives, alcohol and masks for all the 1, 700 teachers in the city.

“The city school board complied with the Learning Continuity Plan set forth by the DepEd Malolos and it did not leave the teachers on their own. Napakalaking tulong po ito para sa aming mga guro na makasabay sa ‘new normal education’ na ating kinakaharap ngayon,” Alcaraz said in a Facebook post.

The TDC leadership enjoined all its local members and affiliates to persuade their respective local school boards to divert the funds from repair and maintenance, construction and sports facilities to technological needs of both teachers and learners in their localities.

“The need for building may not be that urgent, even the sports activities are suspended. So it may be wise if we spend the money for digital needs. However, to be fair to all, the national government must step in,” Basas ended. #

For details:
Ildefonso Enguerra, TDC-NCRTU President- 0908 1637529
Rommel Alcaraz, COMPSTA President- 0932 8784676
Benjo Basas, TDC National Chairperson- 0927 3356375

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Press Release] Groups welcome assistance to private school teachers under second Bayanihan law -Ating Guro

Groups welcome assistance to private school teachers under second Bayanihan law

The sectoral group Ating Guro Partylist expressed their support to legislators for including private school teachers to the recipients of government financial help under SB 1564 or the “Bayanihan to Recover As One Act.”

“This bill would rectify the errors committed against private school employees because while there was no exemption to teachers and academic workers in private schools from getting assistance packages, most of them were not given any cash aid either by DOLE or DSWD. Unfortunately, most of our private schools do not have the capacity to subsidize the salaries of their teachers since they are dependent to tuition and other fees from their clients,” said Juanito Dona, Jr., a grade school teacher from St. Scholastica’s College and the group’s secretary-general. “And while our public school counterparts are continuously receiving salaries during the community quarantine months, our brothers and sisters in private schools, who comprise the other half of the country’s education workforce were seemingly left behind.” He added.

Dona underscored the fact that while the DepEd and Malacanang have finally decided to re-open classes by August 24, the fate of hundreds of thousands of private school employees who employed under ‘no work, no pay’ scheme “is still hanging and that uncertainty causes anxiety and serious concerns among them.”

According to Dona, there are initial 119, 819 private school teachers affected by the pandemic citing data from a survey conducted by the Federation of Associations of Private Schools Administrators (FAPSA) and those are. The figure, he added is just a part of an estimated 263, 000 teachers and employees hired by private schools.

For its part, the Teachers’ Dignity Coalition (TDC) said it also welcomed this move of the legislature and hoped that all the affected personnel would receive the “needed help during this critical and trying times.”

However, according to Benjo Basas, TDC’s Chairperson, “this crisis has exposed the evil scheme used in hiring teachers as well as their conditions. The practice of contractualization is rampant in schools run by private businesses. Teachers do not enjoy the right to job security and the right to self-organization. In some cases, even the minimum wage policy has not complied.” Basas added that in some particular cases, teachers in private schools were hired through a third party like an employment agency.

“While we appreciate the contributions of private educational institutions to the education sector, we urge the school owners to religiously observe the standards set by law and treat their teachers with dignity,” Basas exclaimed.

Under the proposed law, private school teachers and personnel will receive cash assistance amounting to P5, 000 to P8, 000 depending on the prevailing minimum wage in their respective regions.

“We welcome this one-time assistance but we urge Congress to enact a specific law that would ensure the protection of rights and welfare of our teachers and workers in the private education system,” Dona added.

For details:
JR Dona, Ating Guro Secretary-General
0965-5470700

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Press Release] Teachers welcome Senate approval of School Calendar Revision Bill -TDC

Teachers welcome Senate approval of School Calendar Revision Bill

The Teachers’ Dignity Coalition (TDC) commends the action of both Houses of Congress to the bill that seeks to empower the president to set the opening of classes beyond August. The bill will amend a certain provision of RA 7797 which limits the opening of classes between the first Monday of June to the last day of August.

Last Monday, May 26, both the Senate Committees on Basic and Higher Education approved the consolidated version of several bills into SB 1541, while on Saturday, May 31, the counterpart committees in the lower house approved its own version, the HB 6895.

“The swift action of both Houses of Congress is commendable, our legislators understand the importance and urgency of this policy. We hope that it will soon be signed into law so the President may alter the school opening for SY 2020-2021 beyond August if necessary. If not, then the law will still be relevant. We cannot see the future, anyway,” said Benjo Basas, the group’s national chairperson.

The TDC earlier raised concerns on the preparedness of DepEd to facilitate virtual or distance education citing sentiments from the parents and even some teachers. But the group says that teachers are willing to work for whatever mode is possible and necessary after the DepEd assured the public that face to face learning is not an option for this school year.

“While the President gives his go signal for a blended’ schooling, this will only be finalized when the public is assured of the capacity of the system for remote learning and after the scientific assessment of COVID-19 situation in the country prior to August 24,” Basas, who participated in House hearing last week said.

The bill if signed into law will maintain the preference for the current school calendar but would empower the President, upon the recommendation of the DepEd Secretary to set a different date for the start of the school year in the country of parts of it.

“In the event that Congress approves this proposal, it would not necessarily stop the scheduled school opening on August, but rather it would give prerogative to the President of the Education Secretary to decide on the date of school opening for future emergencies or any fortuitous event that would make schooling impractical. With or without this pandemic, the law would still be relevant,” Basas ended.

The TDC, citing studies from UP Resilience Institute that the safe school opening is after December 2020 and the obvious lack of infrastructure and capacity of school system for distance learning agreed that the school year 2020-2021 opening may be moved to January 2021.

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Statement] TDC reaction on teachers’ June 1 tasks and opening of SY 2020-2021

Benjo Basas, National Chairperson, Teachers Dignity Coalition (TDC). Photo by Arnel Tuazon

TDC reaction on teachers’ June 1 tasks and opening of SY 2020-2021

Like what we have said in the past, as long as the safety of school personnel and learners is ensured, our teachers will gladly comply. They are patiently doing different tasks- virtual and physical even during the Community Quarantine period and they are more than willing to take the online tasks expected of them beginning Monday, June 1. As to the August 24 opening, we still consider it tentative. The events prior to said date- like the local executives’ calls for further delay backed by some legislators’ proposal and the unpredictable pandemic situation will be decisive. But we hope that we are all safe and the system is ready by then.

Reference:
Benjo Basas
TDC National Chairperson
0927-3356375

 

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Statement] On the August 24 ‘new normal’ school opening: address the gaps and fulfill basic requisites first -ASSERT

On the August 24 ‘new normal’ school opening: address the gaps and fulfill basic requisites first

DEPED is poised on opening this school year on August 24 amidst confusion and disarray on the ground.

Parents are opting not to send their children to school pending vaccine and assurance of safety against the contagion. Teachers and school heads could not answer the queries of parents and students about the details of the ‘new normal’ and multi-modal learning that DepEd is announcing. The August 24 opening is anchored on so many questions and uncertainties.

The date is incidental. When do we really say ‘we are ready?’ DepEd should make clear its benchmark and accomplish it. Uncertainty hangs over because DepEd pronouncements are not substantiated. Nothing is moving on the ground.

How do we insure the health protocols in schools? How would social distancing be implemented? Will there be shifting of classes? Do we get more teachers and have more classrooms to meet the 15 – 20 class size?

When 61% of 23 million households have no internet connection and 74% of the 47,013 schools have no internet access, how do we proceed with the online learning?
What infrastructures should be put up for the multi-modal learning? What do we do in areas with no electricity and no internet? How would rural population fare in multi-modal?

What trainings of teachers should be accomplished for online and digital tools? When would they be trained? What orientation and training should be given to parents so they are equipped in assisting in the home learning of children?

What is the plan for small private schools which have been complementing the government’s task of providing education and could no longer cope up with the demands of maintaining their schools?

Two months have passed but to date, there is no clarity yet on how to move forward. It is only now that DepEd is conducting survey among teachers, students and parents. DepEd’s responses to queries are so vague and all the more left us groping in the dark.

With these uncertainties, we support the plan of Senate Committee on Basic Education proposal to amend the law declaring August 24 as the latest day allowed for a school year to open. But this move should be back up by clear cut targets and standards on when to declare ‘we are ready.’

At the minimum, it is crucial that the following be addressed asap:
1. Conduct mass testing for teachers.
2. Speed up the requisites for multi-modal learning (broadcast platforms like radio and television, internet among others).
3. Build the needed infrastructure – internet connections and electrification of all schools in remote provinces.
4. Provide teachers with required gadgets and equipment – laptops and computers, digital notebooks and tablets.
5. Conduct massive and intensive teachers’ training on online platforms, digital tools and other alternative modes.
6. Trim the curriculum to focus on the core subjects and core competencies.
7. Develop and enhance the alternative learning system (ALS) as venue for learning and mechanism for moving up to higher level.
8. Encourage cooperation and partnerships among schools and local government units especially in putting up educational infrastructures.
9. Clinch support and sponsorships from private corporations engaged in digital tools, internet providers, telecommunications and social media entities.
10. Provide realistic and accessible mechanisms to engage organizations of all stakeholders: teachers, students and parents in reshaping education.
11. Ease the economic burden of teachers so they can be effective partners in reshaping education: a) give social amelioration for teachers of private schools affected by no work-no pay policy and all teachers who have become the sole bread winners; b) provide hazard pay to teachers.
12. For budgetary requirements, appropriations for debt payments could be realigned in favor of education needs.

The pandemic forced DEpEd to usher in innovations that should have been made years before. Now, it should get its act together and step up to decisively address all the gaps and inequities.

In ‘new normal’ education, the challenge is still the same – provide ‘education for all’ and make sure that ‘no one is left behind.’

https://www.facebook.com/notes/assert/on-the-august-24-new-normal-school-opening-address-the-gaps-and-fulfill-basic-re/125075982527223/

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Press Release] Assistance to private school teachers reiterated -Ating Guro

Assistance to private school teachers reiterated

While the government is now downgrading the ECQ policies in most of Luzon and the DepEd is already discussing its plans to re-open public school by August 24, a group of education reform and teachers’ rights advocates reiterates its appeal to help private school teachers affected by the crisis.

“While everybody is talking about Ayuda and back to school plans, it seems that another important section of the education sector has left behind.” Said Juanito Dona Jr., a grade school teacher at St. Scholastica’s College and the Secretary-General of ATING GURO Partylist.

“Private school teachers were badly hit by the pandemic-related crisis because most of them are hired thru 10-month contracts. They are among those who are considered as ‘no work, no pay’ workers and they need help both from the government and their employers to be able to survive. Teachers are now displaced and may not find jobs until the next school year opens by August.” Dona added.

Dona said that private school teachers should be prioritized for the grant of assistance especially that the national government has allotted funds to cover 5 million more beneficiaries of the social amelioration program (SAP).

ATING GURO vows to fight to protect the rights and welfare of private school teachers thru legislative lobbying to compel both the DepEd and DOLE to set a standard I term of employment and compensation.

For details:
JR Dona, Ating Guro Secretary-General
0965-5470700
NEWS RELEASE
May 12, 2020

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

[Statement] TDC Reaction on Senate Education Committee Inquiry on COVID-19 Impact

Benjo Basas, National Chairperson, Teachers Dignity Coalition (TDC). Photo by Arnel Tuazon

TDC Reaction on Senate Education Committee Inquiry on COVID-19 Impact

“The inquiry proposed by Sen. Sherwin Gatchalian is an appropriate step. We need to know the impact of COVID-19 to education sector so we could properly analyze and take the necessary response. In formulating policies to cope with the ‘new normal’ we have to consider everything, including the socio-economic conditions of our learners and their families. The outcome of this Senate initiative could also guide the DepEd and the IATF when they finally decide on the date of school opening.”

Reference:
Benjo Basas

TDC National Chairperson

0927-3356375

 

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc

 

[From the web] Education in the New Normal: Address Inequities and Gaps to Insure Accessibility While Transitioning to Digital, Virtual Mode -ASSERT

Education in the New Normal: Address Inequities and Gaps to Insure Accessibility While Transitioning to Digital, Virtual Mode

We should have been alarmed when covid19 deaths in China, the country of origin of the virus, started to fill the news. But our government just took it for granted. It continues with the ‘business as usual’ attitude totally downplaying the potential damage it might bring.

WHO declared it as pandemic on March 11. The government declared Luzon lockdown on March 15. Then we started to witness how ill-prepared the government was to deal with the crisis. The only defined response was the lockdown and the passing of the law granting emergency powers to the President.

The people are helpless as they wait for the promised social amelioration that is delivered in trickles.

As we restlessly count days quarantined in our homes, we witness its continued exponential spread across the globe disrupting all facets of life. The global economy stopped. Festivities canceled. Religious practices disrupted. International sports events backtracked. Cultural activities put on hold.

Education is as gravely affected.

Disruptions and impact

The country-wide closures affected 1,578,657,884 learners accounting for 90.2% of total enrolled in 191 countries.

In the Philippines, basic public schools numbering 47,013 suspended classes disrupting the lives of 22,746,855 students. Examinations suspended. Rites that mark milestones in students’ learning journeys are canceled.

DepEd encouraged home-based learning using its Deped commons platform to catch up with lessons and compensate for lost school days. But this mode is highly dependent on the internet, computers, and tablets. Imagine how students would fare when 61% of 23 million households have no internet connections. Those with wifi suffer from the endless intermittent signals. Though 60.1% of the Philippine population is online, these are mostly mobile phone users.

To date, Philippine education is still in limbo. The only thing definite is that there is no going back.

The pandemic highlights class divides and inadequacies

For so long, Philippine education is in crisis. It is reflective of the situation of society in general. The litany of shortages, inefficiency, and corruption stunted its development. And are past curriculum changes and methods even relevant to the real demands of the times?

Covid19 exposed the skew in education.

Only the middle and upper strata have access to the internet, mobile phones, laptops, and computers. During the lockdown, they continue to have access to lessons. High-paying private schools easily shifted to online-based platforms and digital tools.
The rest wallow in deprivation. These are the students of urban and rural poor: children of peasants, indigenous peoples, workers, daily wage earners, and informal settlers. Quarantined with their parents and siblings and no school day to look forward to, they just idly and anxiously wait for food rations and relief. Accessing Deped commons is the least of their concerns.

The majority of those counted in 61% of the online population are mere cellphone users. Most belong to the 61% of 23 million households and 74% of the 47,013 schools with no internet access.

Teachers’ mindset and attitude towards technology and digital tools should also be addressed. The concept of ‘teachers’ as knowledge-source no longer holds true when a world of information is just a click away. Most public school teachers do not even have laptops and computers and whose access to the online world is mostly through Facebook. They are ‘digital migrants.’ Students are ‘digital natives.’ The virtual world is an extension of the learner’s life. Students are adept and fearless in exploring the online world. Teachers are just starting to understand it.

Multi-modal approach while transitioning to online and digital tools
On a positive note, the pandemic ushered in long-time needed innovations.
Clearly, virtual learning will be the dominant mode as we continue to battle with covid19. In fact, other Asian countries like China, Singapore, and Hongkong have long started with the use of online and digital tools.

Online platforms abound and have been here even before covid19. There is google classroom, zoom, FB live, and WhatsApp. There is also TED@Home which is so rich in learning resources. Students can even access DIY videos of almost anything. Learning could just be anywhere anytime.

Internet and communications technology have been revolutionizing education. Online and digital innovations are reshaping learning modes. Physical classroom set-up will soon be a thing of the past.

We are not prepared. But we have to adapt fast.

Addressing Inequities and Gaps is Crucial to Moving Forward

As the calendar for the next school year is yet to be decided, DepEd needs to step up. The government must support the financial requirements for a radically changed landscape of Philippine education.

In this light, we put forward the following:
1. Speed up the requisites for multi-modal learning (broadcast platforms like radio and television, internet among others).
2. Build the needed infrastructure – internet connections and electrification of all schools in remote provinces.
3. Provisions for gadgets and equipment – laptops and computers, digital notebooks, and tablets.
4. Onboard the teachers asap to the new mode. Conduct massive and intensive teachers’ training on online platforms and digital tools.
5. Ensure that curriculums are relevant. Review core subjects and core competencies.
6. Develop and enhance the alternative learning system (ALS) as a venue for learning and mechanism for moving up to a higher level.
7. Encourage cooperation and partnerships among schools and local government units especially in putting up educational infrastructures.
8. Explore support and sponsorships from private corporations engaged in digital tools, internet providers, telecommunications and social media entities.
9. Engage existing organizations of all stakeholders, especially teachers, students, and parents in reshaping education.
10. The new mode requires a bigger finance allocation. Appropriations for debt payments could be realigned in favor of education as a basic social service.

In the ‘new normal’ mode, changes are occurring in the same neoliberal paradigm
Internet, digital tools and online platforms are the same platforms for cultural aggression. The virtual mode is a fertile ground for decadent attitudes to flourish. It offers information overload rather than nurture critical thinking.

Thus, we should be vigilant against individualism, competition, commercialization, corruption, and consumerism. Let us continue to teach the skills the students need in surviving this world: informed decision making, creative problem solving, and adaptability.

The mode of learning will be changed but the orientation remains the same as we persistently challenged it.

It will still be serving neoliberal ideology. This is the same paradigm that makes education consistently subservient to foreign interests and capital demands. It is always profits and markets over people and rights. Concepts of sovereignty and nationalism will continue to be diffused.

Hence, as we transition to the ‘new normal,’ the progressive section of educators should make sure that the core values we cherish and fight for remain: human and women’s rights, genuine democracy, solidarity, rule of law, social justice, environmental justice, inclusion, and equity.

Let us continue to work for scientific, nationalist, and mass-oriented education. It is always in this context that education will be for the service of the people.###
ASSERT/26 April 2020

 

https://www.facebook.com/notes/assert/education-in-the-new-normal-address-inequities-and-gaps-to-insure-accessibility-/104435531257935/

 

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc.

[From the web] Assistance to private school teachers sought -Ating Guro

NEWS RELEASE
April 28, 2020

Assistance to private school teachers sought

With the further extension to the extended quarantine community in most of Luzon resulting to work stoppage of almost the entire working population, teachers from private schools are among those who were badly hit by the eventual crisis. Thus, ATING GURO, a group of education and teachers’ rights advocates sought the help of both school owners and the government.

“Most of the teachers in private schools as hired thru contracts. They are among those who considered as ‘no work, no pay’ workers and they need help both from the government and their employers to be able to survive this crisis.” Said JR Dona, the group’s secretary-general and a teacher in St. Scholastica’s grade school in Manila.

On its part, the Teachers’ Dignity Coalition (TDC) said the crisis has exposed the evil scheme used in hiring teachers as well as their conditions. “The practice of contractualizatrion is rampant in schools run by private businesses. Teachers do not enjoy the security of tenure and the right to self-organization. In some cases, even the minimum wage policy has not complied.” Said Benjo Basas, the TDC national chairperson.

Both groups called on the government specifically the Labor and Education departments to step in and ensure that teachers who lose their jobs will get assistance from the government and from their employers.

“Teachers who are continually hired in private schools for more than a year should not be subjected to the ‘no work, no pay’ scheme for they should be considered as permanent employees and should at least be given assistance by their employers,” Dona added in reaction to the reports that even some teachers who have been hired in their schools for several years will not receive pay during the lockdown period. “They were forced by the situation. Clearly, it’s not their fault.” Dona added.

The situation, according to ATING GURO is even worse for those whose contracts have ended by the supposed end of the school last March. “Teachers are now displaced and may not find jobs until the next school year opens by August or September or even beyond,” Dona said.

Earlier the DepEd says it considers school opening by the end of August, while the IATF recommends resumption by September. The UP Resilient Institute, on the other hand, proposes the class opening after December of this year.

Both groups asserted that private school teachers should automatically be included in the government’s assistance programs like the Social Amelioration Program (SAP) and the DOLE’s COVID-19 Adjustment Measure Program (CAMP). They will lobby for this in the IATF.

For details:
JR Dona, Ating Guro Secretary-General 0965-5470700
Benjo Basas, TDC National Chairperson 09273356375

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc.

[Statement] Reaksiyon ng TDC sa planong pagbubukas ng klase sa Agosto

Benjo Basas, National Chairperson, Teachers Dignity Coalition (TDC). Photo by Arnel Tuazon

Reaksiyon ng TDC sa planong pagbubukas ng klase sa Agosto

“Kinikilala namin ang hakbang ng Kagawaran ng Edukasyon upang kunin ang opinyon ng stakeholders nito ukol sa pagbubukas ng klase, nguinit hindi survey ang dapat maging batayan ng desisyon kundi ang sitwasyong pangkalusugan kaugnay ng COVID-19. Ang mga ahensiyang pang-agham at pangkalusugan ang nasa posisyon upang magbigay ng pagtataya at rekomendasyon kung kailan ligtas nang magbukas ng klase. Nakahanda kami na suportahan ang anumang hakbang ng DepEd upang maipagpatuloy ang edukasyon ng ating mga bata sa kabila ng krisis na ito. Gayunman, kung sakaling kakailanganin ang distant learning, dapat matiyak na ito’y episyente at accessible sa lahat.”

Para sa mga deatlye:
Benjo Basas, Pambansang Tagapangulo
09273356375

 

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc.

[Statement] A call for understanding and compassion (TDC statement on the arrest of a Gensan teacher)

“While we do not condone any violent acts or statements at this period of national emergency, we plea for understanding and human compassion for our colleague. Apparently, the old lady may be desperate, perhaps not for herself or her family but for other people in her community. What she did was a response of a person who cares for her neighbors, albeit in a manner that may be contrary to our existing laws.”
-Teachers’ Dignity Coalition (TDC)

A call for understanding and compassion
(TDC statement on the arrest of a Gensan teacher)

We are saddened by the news report that a public elementary school teacher from Gen. Santos City was arrested by the police yesterday along with her son, who is also a teacher. The arrest was made following a post in social media which according to the authorities is damaging and seditious.

The said teacher, last Friday posted this on her Facebook account, “CALLING THE ATTENTION OF THE GENERALS, MARAMING MAMAMATAY SA GUTOM IF HINDI TAYO MAGTULUNG TULONG NA IREPORT SA PANGULO NA NAPAKAINUTIL NG ATING MAYOR !!!”

After two hours, she again posted another statement that reads, “PANAWAGAN SA MGA WALA NG MAKAING GENERALS. SUGURIN NYO NA NG SABAY SABAY ANG LAGAO GYM. NAKATAMBAK DOON ANG MGA PAGKAING PARA SA INYO.”

The seemingly sarcastic posts allegedly prompted the LGU legal office to file a complaint which eventually leads to her arrest. The son, a 33-year old teacher tried to defend her mother was arrested too.

While we do not condone any violent acts or statements at this period of national emergency, we plea for understanding and human compassion for our colleagues. Apparently, the old lady may be desperate, perhaps not for herself or her family but for other people in her community. What she did was a response of a person who cares for her neighbors, albeit in a manner that may be contrary to our existing laws.

We call on the honorable mayor of General Santos City and the city police as well as the Department of Justice to be more understanding and exercise human compassion. We stand by the earlier pronouncement of Hon. Menardo Guevarra, the good secretary of justice that “During abnormal times like these, when people are prone to commit mistakes or violations of the law, the DOJ will temper the rigor of the law with human compassion.” And we believe that this applies also to an ordinary classroom teacher and not just to a sitting senator, they are both humans, after all.

May this incident also serve as a reminder to our leaders, especially to our local government units to expedite the delivery of assistance to their respective jurisdictions. An open communication system with the communities would also help so as not to develop unrest among the local population.

Lastly, we call on our colleagues in the teaching profession and in the general public to exercise prudence and sobriety amidst this crisis. # March 28, 2020
(Photo courtesy of Rappler)

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc.

[Statement] Pahayag ng TDC hinggil sa suspensiyon ng klase at pag-oobliga sa mga guro na maglinis sa paaralan

Kasunod ng kanselasyon ng mga klase sa Metro Manila at ilang mga lalawigan at bayan sa Central Luzon at CALABARZON, dapat matiyak na hindi na rin obligadong papasukin ang mga guro, lalo na kung ang layunin ay ang maglinis o mag-disinfect lamang ng paaralan. Kung pinoprotektahan natin ang mga bata, dapat ay gayundin ang ating mga guro sapagkat posible rin silang mahawaan ng virus na ito.

Hindi iilang paaralan sa mga nasabing lugar ang nag-ulat sa amin na ang mga guro ay pinapupunta sa kani-kanilang paaralan upang tumulong sa paglilinis o gumawa ng anumang bagay kaugnay sa kanilang mga trabaho.

Hinihiling namin sa DepEd management na agarang ipaalala ito sa field officials sapagkat ito’y alinsunod lamang sa DepEd Order No. 43, s. 2012 at linawin na walang obligasyong mag-report, lalo na maglinis ang mga guro. Marapat din na ipatupad ito hindi lamang sa mga pampublikong paaralan kundi maging sa mga pribado.

Reference:
Benjo Basas, National Chairperson
0927-3356375

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

« Older Entries