Tag Archives: Street Children

[In the news] Ex-street kid to public: We can change too -INQUIRER.net

A former street “rugby boy” has asked the public to stop stereotyping street children and youth offenders as criminals, instead give them the chance to reform saying they too can change.

“Dapat ‘yun yung makita nila hindi yung gawa lang kayo nang gawa ng batas isipin nila kung paano nila matutulungan kasi pag-inahon mo yan gagawa ba ng masama yan? Ano ang magagawa niyan? Katulad ko ngayon, ibinalik ko ang natutunan ko ngayon at ang ginawa sakin nito,” Simeon Ulanday, from children rights foundation Bahay Tuluyan, said in a press briefing in Quezon City on Thursday.

Before, Ulanday was a kid involved in drugs and crime, but now, with the assistance of Bahay Tuluyan, he helps out in non-government organizations.

“Dati akong rugby boy, solvent boy [pero] ngayon isa na po ako sa nire-respeto nila [street children] bilang kuya at nakakatanda,” Ulanday said.

“Ngayon po nagtatrabaho po ako sa Recto kapag walang pasok nagvovolunteer pa rin ako… Sa mga [non-government organizations],” he added.

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Ex-street kid to public: We can change too

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[Statement] Bahay Tuluyan lauds the national government for establishing the Sub-Committee on the Protection and Welfare for Children in Street Situations

STATEMENT FROM BAHAY TULUYAN
INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR STREET CHILDREN

More than 3 decades after the first national attempts to address the plight of children on the street in the Philippines, the situation for these children in many Philippine cities remains dire. In the recent 3rd Street Children’s Congress in the Philippines, hosted by Bahay Tuluyan, street-connected children shared their experiences of surviving in harsh urban environments. Pushed and pulled onto the street by a variety of factors, children recounted stories of violence, abuse, stigmatization, torture, and even death. They expressed deep desires to be noticed, accepted, cared for.

Their voices, as expressed in their statement and creative outputs, must be heard. We fully and strongly support their statements and calls for action.

The UNCRC General Comment 21 on Children in Street Situations (GC 21), released in June 2017, is a landmark document for children in street situations. GC 21 recognizes, at the highest level, that children in street situations need to be protected, listened to and assisted. For the Philippines, GC 21 presents an opportunity to become a world leader in terms of responding effectively and holistically to the needs of street-connected children through a framework of international best practices.

Bahay Tuluyan lauds the national government for establishing the Sub-Committee on the Protection and Welfare for Children in Street Situations as a first step to ensuring the potential of GC 21 is effectively harnessed. It also strongly supports the initial efforts by this committee to develop a national plan of action for Children in Street Situations aiming to implement in full the recommendations of GC 21 through “The 4 Steps to Equality”:

1. Commit to Equality
2. Protect Every Child
3. Provide Access to Services
4. Create Specialised Solutions

We call on the Philippine government, from the barangay level to the national government, to build on the progress made so far by fully committing to achieve equality and dignity for all street connected children.

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[From the web] Children CAGED to keep the streets clean for the Pope: Police round up orphans and chain them in filth during pontiff’s visit to Philippines -MAILONLINE

Children CAGED to keep the streets clean for the Pope: Police round up orphans and chain them in filth during pontiff’s visit to Philippines
By Simon Parry, MAILONLINE
January 14, 2015

MailOnline

Street children as young as five are being caged in brutal detention centres alongside adult criminals in a cynical drive to smarten up the Philippines capital ahead of a visit by Pope Francis this week.

Hundreds of boys and girls have been rounded up from doorways and roadsides by police and officials and put behind bars in recent weeks to make the poverty-racked city more presentable when Pope Francis arrives tomorrow, a MailOnline investigation has found.

In a blatant abuse of the country’s own child protection laws, the terrified children are locked up in filthy detention centres where they sleep on concrete floors and where many of them are beaten or abused by older inmates and adult prisoners and, in some cases, starved and chained to pillars.

Six million people are expected to attend an open air mass conducted by Pope Francis in Manila’s Rizal Park on Sunday, which will watched by a global TV audience and officials appear determined to ensure that urchins are hidden from view.

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