Tag Archives: press freedom

[From the web] Philippine Authorities Go After Media, Online Critics -HRW

Philippine Authorities Go After Media, Online Critics
Misuse of COVID-19 Law as Dozens Face Probes, Backlash

By Carlos H. Conde
Researcher, Asia Division
Human Rights Watch
@condeHRW

The Philippine government is cracking down on journalists and social media users critical of the government’s COVID-19 response, threatening media freedom and the rights to free expression and access to information.

On March 24, President Rodrigo Duterte signed a COVID-19 law that provides the administration funding and grants broad emergency powers to address the coronavirus. A last-minute provision criminalizes the spreading of “false information” with up to 2 months in prison and a 1 million peso (US$19,600) fine.

National and local authorities have used COVID-19 and existing legislation against those critical of the government’s response to the coronavirus outbreak. Last week, the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) initiated legal action against 17 people for allegedly posting “false information” online, an offense that carries steep penalties. Police filed cases against two journalists, citing violations of the COVID-19 law and other laws. Police also brought a case against a town mayor for allegedly “causing a COVID-19 scare.”

Local government officials have taken action against critical journalists. The governor of Cebu province sent an intimidating message to the editor of a campus newspaper for criticizing the government’s COVID-19 response. Neighborhood leaders in Nueva Ecija province called in the editor of a campus paper to press him to apologize for publishing critical posts.

On Thursday, human rights lawyer Jose Manuel Diokno disclosed on Twitter that the NBI had subpoenaed a Facebook user for his critical posts, citing the COVID-19 law. “This has become a concerning trend because it is easy for the government to blur the line between legitimate criticism and ‘fake news,’” Diokno told Human Rights Watch. Diokno’s decision to take on this case prompted President Duterte to publicly accuse the lawyer of encouraging people to violate lockdowns.

The national and local governments are using their authority, buttressed by a problematic provision of the law, to crack down on critics while proclaiming they are simply going after peddlers of incorrect COVID-19 information. Duterte should call on government officials to focus on measures to defeat the coronavirus and ensure that Filipinos have access to information, rather than be deprived of it.

Source: www.hrw.org

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[Statement] On Joshua Molo’s forced public apology -YND

The Youth for Nationalism and Democracy – (YND) Philippines strongly upholds the right of the students and the youth to freedom of speech and expression and condemns any act of intimidation and suppression of such, as what had happened in the case of a student-leader in Nueva Ecija.

Facing threat of a libel case over his Facebook post expressing his dissent on President Duterte’s lack of action to address the needs of the Filipinos amidst the Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19) in the country, University of the East (UE) Dawn’s editor-in-chief Joshua Molo was forced to make a public apology on 04 April 2020.

According to a report by Redwire, Molo’s former teachers in high school who are pro-Dutertes were offended by his social media post against the Duterte administration and reported him to the Brgy. Hall of San Fernando Sur, Cabiao, Nueva Ecija where he was coerced to be filmed apologizing and promising to never do such, again.

This incident is a clear violation of Molo’s right to freedom of speech and expression as guaranteed by the 1987 Constitution. Moreover, it is never libelous for concerned and responsible citizens of the Philippines to express their political beliefs including their criticisms on the administration’s processes and actions.

This act of political intimidation of teachers to their student who merely exercises critical thinking is a reflection of how political patronage has wreaked havoc on the democratic spaces of the youth and the students’ academic freedom where exchange and expressions of their ideas and beliefs are unconstrained by authorities.

We call on teachers and educators to encourage their students to exercise critical thinking for nation-building as the realest value of education, instead of reporting and getting offended by such practice. We also appeal the students and all concerned citizens to continue speaking up for the truth and their rights and beliefs and not be threatened by any act of harassment and intimidation so long as we do not violate any law.

Speaking the truth amidst prevalent disinformation and misinformation in the country is all the more critical. It is high time that we assert our freedom of speech and expression as the tyrannical administration relentlessly attacks its critics. No act of harassment shall mute the collective voices of empowered, nationalist, and democracy-loving students, leaders, and citizens.

#DefendFreedomOfSpeech
#UpholdFreedomOfExpression
#NoToPoliticalIntimidation
#ResistTyranny
#DefendAcademicFreedom

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[Statement] of CHR Spokesperson on the alleged ‘forced’ public apology order on University of the East’s campus paper chief

06 April 2020

The Commission on Human Rights (CHR) denounces the alleged repressive actions against Joshua B. Molo, Editor-in-Chief of The Dawn, the official campus paper of the University of the East.

On his personal social media account, the student journalist expressed his criticisms on how the government is handling the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19 crisis), but these remarks did not sit well with the opinions of his former teachers. One of them reported Molo to authorities and allegedly threatened to file a cyber libel case against him if he does not do a public apology. He was summoned to the Barangay Hall of San Fernando Sur in Nueva Ecija.

The CHR condemns this blatant disregard for Molo’s dignity and fundamental human rights. The right to freedom of opinion and expression is the lifeblood of a democratic society.

Efforts by government and non-government entities to suppress nonviolent expression could lead to far more dangerous and compromising outcomes, as free speech is a necessary precondition to the enjoyment of other rights such as freedom of assembly and association, press freedom, and right to vote among others. Laws are meant to protect rights, not curtail them.

We reiterate that dissent and expression of grievance against government actions and views are not crimes—but are constitutionally recognized rights. Instead of going after individuals and organizations who articulate their dissatisfaction to the government response to the current crisis, addressing the main issues, such as hunger, unemployment, and other pressing concerns must be prioritized. Dissenting voices are necessary and should be given space in order to allow better leadership.

How our society tolerates and entertains the most minority and disfavoured views reflect how it values and recognizes the worth of our fundamental freedoms. We call on every Filipino to remain vigilant in defending our freedom of expression while holding the real perpetrators of anti-people policies, not the innocents, to account. Instead of shrinking democratic spaces, our collective goal should always improve the way each and everyone’s rights are upheld, guided by the laws that protect them.

https://www.facebook.com/notes/commission-on-human-rights-of-the-philippines/statement-of-chr-spokesperson-on-the-alleged-forced-public-apology-order-on-univ/2721811077935420/?hc_location=ufi

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[Statement] The Image Publication, the Official Student Publication of Occidental Mindoro State College, stands with Mr. Molo, EIC of UE Dawn

Last April 5, 2020, University of the East (UE) Dawn’s Editor-in-Chief Joshua Molo was allegedly forced to choose between two options: to voluntarily sign a waiver that he will not post any anti-government sentiment again and issue a public apology or face arrest and detention.

The “choices” were given when Molo’s former teachers filed a blotter-complaint against him stemming from an online argument about the former’s social media posts criticizing the government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. He was threatened with a cyber-libel case unless he makes a public apology on Facebook and stops voicing out his criticism on the inaction of the government.

The Image Publication, the Official Student Publication of Occidental Mindoro State College, stands with Mr. Molo, Campus Journalists and Publications in the country, and other media-related groups in condemning this act that directly attacks our freedom of speech enshrined in the Philippine Constitution.

The Image Publication will continue to speak without gag and write without shackles, a right we must all exercise and protect.

#DefendPressFreedom

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[Statement] On the recent harassment of UE Dawn’s editor-in-chief for posting opinion on the government’s inaction towards COVID-19 pandemic- The Guild

The Guilds strongly condemn this kind of harassment to Joshua Molo, editor-in-chief of the University of the East’s Dawn, after he has been subjected to threats by his former teachers and the responding officials of Cabiao, Nueva Ecija where he resides.

Mr. Molo was forced to publicly apologize after a former high school teacher cried foul over his posts in his personal social media space. The teacher sought help to area officials where they threatened to file a cyber-libel case against Mr. Molo. The editor-in-chief was then threatened to be forcibly picked up once he discontinues posting his opinions towards the government.

May it be known to everybody that this kind of act against Mr. Molo is a clear violation to Article III Section 4 of the Bill of Rights which states that no law shall be passed abridging the freedom of speech, of expression, or of the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and petition the government for a redress of grievances.

The publication strongly believes that Mr. Molo, and everyone’s right to free speech should not be delimited or bounded by praises to the government. This act of persecution is suppressive and dehumiliating and that people behind this blatant act must be deemed responsible for forming guilt to someone who has not done anything wrong to feel so.

__________________
Designed and Photo by John Robin S. Abejar

#TheGuilds
#DefendPressFreedom

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[Statement] on ABS-CBN’s Franchise Crisis -EcoWaste Coalition

The EcoWaste Coalition, a non-profit environmental health organization, is gravely alarmed by the mounting danger of ABS-CBN losing its congressional franchise, which is set to expire on 30 March 2020.

Grossly upset by the quo warranto petition filed by the Office of the Solicitor General asking the Supreme Court to forfeit the franchise of the media institution, the EcoWaste Coalition appeals to the House Committee on Legislative Franchises, which has jurisdiction on “all matters directly and principally relating to the grant, amendment, extension or revocation of franchises,” to convene itself and speedily consider bills seeking to renew the franchise of the media network.

As an advocate for the public’s right to know, we consider the moves to shut down ABS-CBN as a severe blow to the freedom of speech and of the press and contrary to the state policy that “recognizes the vital role of communication and information in nation-building.” A free press is essential in the pursuit of the constitutionally-guaranteed rights to health and to a balanced and healthful ecology, and the full respect of human rights.

As shutting down ABS-CBN will leave a huge void in environmental education and advocacy, noting the network’s programs and projects in defense of the environment and in support of disadvantaged communities, we urge members of Congress to cross party lines, and work double-time to uphold due process and to ensure that its power to grant, amend, extend or revoke franchises is duly respected and not by-passed or usurped by other government instrumentalities.

For the sake of a free press, for the sake of environmental protection and public service, and for the sake of the thousands of workers employed by the network and its subsidiaries, we urge both the House of Representatives and the Senate not to fail in exercising their duty to prevent the non-renewal of ABS-CBN’s franchise, a tragic debacle that will deeply divide and sadden our nation.

Aileen Lucero
National Coordinator
EcoWaste Coalition
EcoWaste Coalition <info@ecowastecoalition.org>
Tue, Feb 11, 11:40 AM (3 days ago)
to HRonlinePH

EcoWaste Coalition
78-A Masigla Extension, 1100 Quezon City, Philippines
Phone: +632-82944807 E-Mail: info@ecowastecoalition.org
Website: http://www.ecowastecoalition.org

11 February 2020

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[Statement] HRW reaction to quo warranto case filed by the Philippine government against ABS-CBN

The quo warranto case filed by the Solicitor General today against ABS-CBN, the country’s largest and most influential network, has all the indications of political harassment. This is clearly an attempt by the Duterte government to intimidate or control ABS-CBN, which has aired and published critical reporting on the government, including its deadly “war on drugs.”

With the network’s legislative franchise renewal pending before Congress, this case applies undue pressure on legislators who could be forced to toe the Duterte government’s line against the media company. Already, some legislators have stated that this cause could jeopardize the franchise renewal, which ends March 30. President Duterte has not made secret his displeasure toward ABS-CBN and has expressed his intention to shut it down.

This case by the government’s chief lawyer underscores Duterte’s determination to shutter the network, in the same manner that he has gone after the news website Rappler for its critical reportage of the “war on drugs.” Filipinos and advocates of press freedom should reject this move and assert their right to a free press.

Carlos Conde
Researcher, Asia Division
Human Rights Watch
@condeHRW

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[In the news] DOH official berates Rappler journalist for covering hospital inspection -RAPPLER.com

A Department of Health (DOH) official berated Basilan-based Rappler journalist Richard Falcatan for covering a hospital inspection he was invited to cover on Saturday, June 8.

DOH Director Leonita Gorgolon, director for Health Facilities Enhancement Program, shouted at Rappler correspondent and DXNO Basilan station manager Richard Falcatan at the Basilan General Hospital in Isabela City, demanding that he provide a formal letter to authorize him to cover the event.

“Who gave you the permission to cover? You should write first an official letter before covering or taking photos,” Gorgolon said.

Gorgolon is part of DOH’s Health Facilities and Infrastructure Development Team. She insisted that Falcatan asks for permission before taking photos during the inspection of a public place.

Read more @www.rappler.com

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[In the news] ‘False, garbage’ – Maria Ressa, Ellen Tordesillas, PCIJ on Duterte ‘ouster plot’ -RAPPLER.com

News heads Maria Ressa of Rappler and Ellen Tordesillas of Vera Files on Monday, April 22, slammed the government over a matrix linking them and other journalists to an alleged plot to oust President Rodrigo Duterte.

Aside from Rappler and Vera Files, the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ) was also implicated in the matrix.

Malacañang had revealed that the “Oust-Duterte” matrix published in The Manila Times was based on the same questionable intelligence report received by Duterte and the same information that the Palace was supposed to reveal on Monday.

Rappler CEO Ressa called the report, which contained a web-like matrix implicating journalists and lawyers, “garbage” and said it is “another Palace ploy to harass journalists.”

“It’s embarrassing for supposed ‘intelligence’ using i2 analyst notebook software to make fantasies look plausible. Go back to the drawing board. I’ve worked with many good folks in PH intelligence. Sad to see them reduced to garbage. Yet another Palace ploy to harass journalists,” Ressa tweeted.

Ressa denied receiving an e-mail from Vera Files’ Tordesillas, as claimed by the report.

“It’s bad when the government lies through its paid PR to manipulate its people. They should also get it through their heads that I do not run day-to-day editorial. It’s been years since Ellen and I have even emailed each other. Good God,” Ressa said.

Read more @www.rappler.com/nation

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[From the web] Press Freedom Part 1 | Threats -RAPPLER.com

Press Freedom Part 1 | Threats

 

In this short video, journalists Ezra Acayan, Ed Lingao, JC Gotinga, Pia Ranada, Jason Gutierrez and Inday Espina-Varona speak of the attack against the free press, and what will stop them from reporting. #DefendPressFreedom

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[From the web] A new weapon against press freedom in the Philippines -www.theglobeandmail.com

A new weapon against press freedom in the Philippines

Carlos Conde, former correspondent for The New York Times in Manila, is the Philippines researcher for Human Rights Watch.

As a former journalist, I often find myself straining to explain press freedom in the Philippines. Many people I meet seem to have a rather straightforward view: Either the press is free or it is not. I wish it were that simple, I tell them.

The Philippines, officially, does not have prior restraint regulations that prevent journalists from publishing. Pretty much anything goes, which is why the Philippine press has been classified as free, rambunctious even. Filipino journalists struggled quite a lot, particularly during the Ferdinand Marcos dictatorship, when many paid with their lives to make sure the press stayed that way.

Read full article @www.theglobeandmail.com

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[From the web] Speak Truth to Power, Keep Power in Check -PCIJ

Speak Truth to Power, Keep Power in Check
03 May 2018

RODRIGO R. Duterte’s presidency has altered and controlled the public discourse so radically in its favor in ways rude and bold. Its tragic result: it has restricted and narrowed the celebrated freedom of the Philippine press and the people’s cherished right to know.

In his first 22 months in power, Mr. Duterte has earned the dubious honor of logging 85 various cases of attacks and threats on these dual values that the Constitution upholds as inalienable rights of the citizens. The number far exceeds those recorded under four presidents before him.

Separately and together, these 85 cases — murders, death threats, slay attempts, libel, online harassment, website attacks, revoked registration or denied franchise renewal, verbal abuse, strafing, and police surveillance of journalists and media agencies from June 30, 2016 to May 1, 2018 — have made the practice of journalism an even more dangerous endeavor under Duterte.

These cases project the force of presidential power dominating the political sphere, with zealous support from Duterte allies and appointees, and their sponsored misinformation army online and off. They have hurled at members of the press insults and unfair labels, and allegations of corruption and misconduct without firm basis in fact or in law.

These cases linger amid effete efforts at solution by state agencies, and in the context of the hostile and vicious discourse against the administration’s critics and the critical media.

The President, Cabinet members, and the House of Representatives have imposed and proposed unprecedented restrictions on journalist access to official news events. Congress and executive agencies have denied or delayed the corporate registration or franchises required for operation of media companies.

Some journalists and media groups have also reported police surveillance of their movement and their places of work.

Attacks on press freedom diminish not just the news media. These weaken the capacity of the news media to sustain the people’s unfettered exchange of ideas about public issues. Presidential intolerance of criticism is now a well-established aspect of Duterte’s leadership. While he is not the only chief executive who has become sensitive to press criticism, Duterte has made sure that everyone understands that misfortunes could hound and befall his critics.

And yet Duterte has promised change; his government should wish to tell the people when and where change has come to fruition, and whether it has triggered better or worse results. By keeping citizens and voters fully informed, the media empowers the public to check whether those they elected to power are doing right or wrong. A free press sustains and strengthens democracy.

So far, that is not quite the situation under Duterte. Intimidated, restrained, and threatened with consequences, the news media have been significantly restricted to report well and fully on the war on drugs, the siege of Marawi, cases of alleged corruption in high office, questions about the wealth of the Duterte family, the public debate on Charter change and federalism, the shutdown of Boracay, and not the least significant, the incursions of China in the West Philippine Sea.

To be sure, the state of press freedom in the Philippines reflects long standing problems that beset the practice of the press, taking into account the economic inequalities among media organizations, the poor pay for many working in the provinces, and the opportunities for corruption for those vulnerable to political manipulation.

The phrase “attacks and threats” has been used by media watch organizations to sum up the many ways in which a free press is weakened, leading to the failure of its function as well as to its own dysfunctional operations.

Attacks and Threats: 22 Months, 85 Cases

By the diligent and independent monitoring of the Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility (CMFR) and the National Union of Journalists of the Philippines (NUJP), from June 30, 2016 to May 1, 2018, the following cases of attacks of press freedom have been recorded under the Duterte administration:

• 9 journalists had been killed in the line of duty, with their last reports focusing separately on the drug trade, and local crime and corruption.
• 16 libel cases with mostly by state officials/agencies as complainants, including three that had been filed before June 30, 2016. The courts have dismissed two of these three and acquitted the respondent in the third case.
• 14 cases of online harassment, perpetrated mostly by Duterte supporters;
• 11 death threats, after delivering reports critical of public officials, including Duterte;
• 6 cases of slay attempts, mostly by gunmen riding in motorcycles;
• 6 cases of harassment, mostly by state officials/agencies;
• 5 cases of intimidation, mostly by local officials;
• 4 cases of website attack;
• 4 cases of physical assault, mostly by local officials;
• 3 cases of cyber libel;
• 3 instances of reporters barred from coverage, by the Office of the President;
• 2 cases of registration revoked or franchise denial;
• 1 strafing incident that occurred in Region XII; and
• 1 case of verbal assault in Metro Manila, excluding multiple instances when the President himself took verbal broadsides, cursed, and scolded journalists, and threatened certain media agencies with closure.

Nearly all media platforms had been bruised and battered. The 85 cases have affected journalists and media agencies from radio, 30 cases; online, 22 cases; print, 19 cases; television, 12 cases; and online print/radio/TV and photojournalism, 1 case each.

By gender, nearly a third or 53 of the cases involved male journalists, while 16 female journalists and 16 media organizations make up the balance.

By location, nearly half or 40 of the 85 cases occurred in the National Capital Region or Metro Manila. One case of denial of access imposed by Philippine officials occurred in Singapore, to the prejudice of foreign correspondents working in Manila.

No cases were recorded during the period in four regions: Cagayan Valley (Region II), the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao, MIMAROPA (Region IV-B, Southwestern Tagalog) and Northern Mindanao (Region X).

The other regions and their case breakdown follow:

• Region XIII CARAGA, 7 cases;
• Region IV-A, CALABARZON, 5;
• Region V, Bicol Region, 5;
• Region I, Ilocos Region, 4;
• Region VIII, Eastern Visayas, 4;
• Region XI, Davao Region, 4;
• Region IX, Zamboanga Peninsula, 3;
• Region VII, Central Visayas, 4;
• Region XII SOCCSKSARGEN, 3;
• Region III, Central Luzon, 2;
• Region VI, Western Visayas, 2; and
• Cordillera Administrative Region, 1.

Read full article @pcij.org

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[From the web] Philippine Government Bans Journalist from Presidential Palace Locking Out Rappler News Site Threatens Media Freedoms -HRW

Philippine Government Bans Journalist from Presidential Palace
Locking Out Rappler News Site Threatens Media Freedoms
By Carlos H. Conde
Researcher, Asia Division
Human Rights Watch
@condeHRW

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s administration renewed its assault on the media by banning a reporter and the executive editor from the news site Rappler from entering the executive office at Malacañang Palace. The ban followed a Senate hearing on a controversial frigate deal, during which a top Duterte aide accused Rappler and the Philippine Daily Inquirer of publishing “fake news,” which both news outlets denied.

The administration gave no clear reasons for banning the reporter, Pia Ranada, from media briefings. The presidential spokesman, Harry Roque, said Ranada could still enter Malacanang, while a senior Malacañang official, Jhopee Avancena, said she could not. Rappler reported that Avancena sent Ranada a text message saying that Duterte himself had ordered her kept out.

Ranada has been covering the presidential beat as a member of the Malacañang Press Corps. She has become known not just for putting tough questions to the president during press briefings, but also for being the target of presidential ire. Ranada and Rappler’s CEO and executive editor, Maria Ressa, have been vilified by Duterte supporters on social media as part of a seemingly organized campaign against critical journalists.

Previously, the Philippine Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) ordered the revocation of Rappler’s license to operate. The SEC alleged that, as Rappler had received investment funds from the international investor Omidyar Network, that it also gave the investors control over the media company, in violation of the Constitution. Rappler denied the allegation, calling it part of the government’s campaign to silence it, and is appealing the SEC ruling.

Ranada is believed to be the first reporter denied access to Malacañang Palace since the dictatorship of President Ferdinand Marcos, who severely curtailed media freedom. It could portend a broader assault on journalists and news organizations, whose critical watchdog role has magnified the government’s poor human rights record, from extrajudicial killings of thousands of alleged drug dealers and users to conflict-related abuses in the south. Filipinos this week celebrate the 32nd anniversary of the 1986 People Power uprising that led to the ouster of Marcos, inspiring the world. They should also take this opportunity to show their support for a free press.

https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/02/20/philippine-government-bans-journalist-presidential-palace

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[Announcement] Report cases of attacks, threats, and killings of journalists and media workers. -CMFR

Report cases of attacks, threats, and killings of journalists and media workers -CMFR

Report cases of attacks, threats, and killings of journalists and media workers -CMFR

Defend press freedom. Report cases of attacks, threats, and killings of journalists and media workers. You can send us a direct message here or an email (staff@cmfr-phil.org) about the details of the incident. You can also share this photo to inform others with the hashtags #PressFreedomWatch and #endimpunityinPH

CMFR

Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility

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[From the web] Respect the students’ right to press freedom! Statement calling for an end to campus press freedom violations committed against UPHL Gazette -CEGP

Respect the students’ right to press freedom! Statement calling for an end to campus press freedom violations committed against UPHL Gazette.

cegpThe College Editors Guild of the PhilippinesSouthern Tagalog chapter expresses strong support to the ongoing campaign of the UPHL Gazette, the official student publication of the University of Perpetual Help – Biñan, Laguna, in their struggle against recent cases of campus press freedom violations committed primarily by their School Director, Dr. Ferdinand Somido.

Under our independent investigation on the matter, we have found the School Director, and otheradministrative officials involved, in violation of the students’ right to campus press freedom, namely: withholding and non-collection of publication fees, meddling with the editorial board selection process, threats of expulsion and suspension of student editors and writers, and threat of outright closure of the publication.

These cases violate provisions stipulated under the Republic Act 7079 or the Campus Journalism Act of 1991 and goes against the principles expressed in House Bill 4287 or the Campus Press Freedom Bill filed by Kabataan Partylist in the 15th Congress.

Read full article @www.cegp.org

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[Featured Site] Visual Spectrum by Carlo Dimaano

Visual Spectrum

REVISITING THE PAST by Carlo Dimaano

REVISITING THE PAST by Carlo Dimaano

Visual art has shown that art without advocacy floats in a void while art with a direction and reflective of the people’s sentiments is by itself an accomplishment that can be instantly shared with others.  A bold move to break away from conventional art is to immerse with the ordinary people to learn from them and to reflect their very sentiments through a medium that is known as people’s art.

See more of Carlo Dimaano’s works @http://visualspectrum.weebly.com/index.html

Iboto ang iyong #HRPinduterosChoice para sa HR FEATURED SITES.

Ang botohan ay magsisimula ngayon hanggang sa 11:59 ng Nov 15, 2013.

Ikaw para kanino ka pipindot? Simple lang bumoto:
• i-LIKE ang thumbnail/s ng iyong mga ibinoboto sa HRonlinePH facebook, i-share at ikampanya.
• Bisitahin ang post sa HRonlinePH.com (links sa bawat thumbnail) at pindutin ang button sa poll sa ilalim ng bawat nominadong post.
• Most number of the combined likes sa FB at sa poll buttons ang magiging 3rd HR Pinduteros Choice na kikilalanin sa 2013 HR week celebration.

Makiisa sa pagpapalaganap ng impormasyon hinggil sa karapatang pantao. Pindot na!

WHAT IS 3RD HR PINDUTEROS CHOICE AWARDS? https://hronlineph.com/2013/10/01/3rd-human-rights-pinduteros-choice-awards/

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[Featured Video] Speak up against impunity -NUJP

SPEAK UP AGAINST IMPUNITY
National Union of Journalists of the Philippines

nujp-logoJanuary 23 marks the 39th month since the Ampatuan Massacre. Since 1986, 154 journalists, including 32 of the 58 victims in the brutal murder, have been killed in the line of duty.

The insatiable lust for power by some, a wanton disregard for rights, and the weakness of institutions that are supposed to protect us from injustice have allowed Ampatuan Massacre and other murders to happen. That is how impunity works.

From today until the 23rd and even beyond, feel free to post and share this video. Say a thing or two against impunity.

Stand up for press freedom. Stand against impunity. (Public service ad created by BBDO)

Watch video @ https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151244100324141

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[Petition] A Million Signatures for Truth, Justice and Press Freedom – ramatak.net

Source: http://ramatak.net/

August 24 marks the 7th month since the murder of my father, Doc Gerry Ortega. I am knocking on your door again, asking you to please add your voice to the chorus this week–mention it in a column, a blog, Facebook, Twitter, discuss it on radio, with friends, etc.

We have evidence that is more than enough to establish probable cause. The DOJ simply refuses to do its job. Their decision to absolve Joel Reyes & co. is testament to a commitment to the status quo–that is, a culture of impunity. We must not let this happen.

When government condones media killings, we shout.
When they turn their backs on us, we shout even louder.

My father was simply exposing corruption, which this selfsame government vows to stop.

And so, in behalf of my family and the people of Palawan, we ask you again to please lend us your voice. Your voice is strong and loud and clear, for you are heard, you are listened to.

Please help us.

Thank you.

Yours,
Mika Ortega

Support and sign please follow this link http://ramatak.net/?page_id=342

[In the news] Press freedom declines worldwide but PH posts ‘modest improvement – Freedom House – Interaksyon.com

Press freedom declines worldwide but PH posts ‘modest improvement – Freedom House – Interaksyon.com.

Nonoy Espina, InterAksyon.com

MANILA, Philippines – A press freedom watchdog said ‘the number of people worldwide with access to free and independent media declined to its lowest level in over a decade’ last year, although the Philippines, which is still considered one of the most dangerous places in the world to practice journalism, registered a ‘modest improvement.’

The Philippines rose to 93rd of 196 countries assessed by Freedom House in 2010, the group’s “Freedom of the Press 2011: A Global Survey of Media Independence” showed. The year before, the Philippines was at 97th place.

However, the improvement was not enough to lift the country from its “Partly Free” status, attributed to the high number of journalists murdered in the country and what Freedom House calls “a high rate of impunity for such crimes.”

The Freedom House report was released late Monday, the eve of World Press Freedom Day on May 3.

Of the countries and territories assessed by Freedom House in 2010, 68, or 35 percent, were rated “Free,” 65 (33 percent) were rated “Partly Free,” and 63 (32 percent) were rated “Not Free.” North Korea continued to occupy the tail-end of the Freedom House rankings.

(To view a copy of the report, click here.)

But while Freedom House executive director David Kramer said “restrictive and dangerous environments for journalists” were to be expected in nondemocratic countries like those in the Middle East, “we are particularly troubled this year by declines in young or faltering democracies like Mexico, Hungary and Thailand,” which descended to “Not Free” status.

“A country where journalists cannot report freely without fear of interference, by the government or other actors, has little hope of achieving or maintaining true democracy,” he said.

Read full article @ InterAksyon.com

[In the news] Urgent as ever – www.panaynewsphilippines.com

This article is extracted from the Editorial of  Panay News. Below is the Editor’s note and to read full article please follow the link http://www.panaynewsphilippines.com/editorial.htm

(We yield this space to the statement of the Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility on the occasion of World Press Freedom Day, May 3, 2011. – Editor.)

AS in the past, World Press Freedom Day 2011 is being commemorated after a year (May 2010-May 2011) of global and national turmoil.

Iraq and Afghanistan continued to occupy media attention and to subject journalists to the usual perils of covering conflict areas. Five journalists were killed in Iraq in 2010, and two in Afghanistan. And while the unrest in the Middle East and North Africa was among the unique characteristics of 2010-2011, the political crises in Egypt, Tunisia. Yemen, Bahrain, Syria and Libya did subject journalists to the same perils of being killed, threatened, harassed or abducted while doing their jobs. Four journalists were killed in Libya, two in Egypt, and several others abducted.

The Philippine media situation has resisted change despite the change of administration in July 2010. The Ampatuan Massacre trial is continuing, but in terms of results has virtually come to a standstill, bogged down in the tedious processes involved in resolving technical issues, even as the killing of journalists has continued, with nine cases of journalists killed, of which six were work related.

The same ethical and professional shortcomings that have made the media the subject of citizen skepticism and even scorn still haunt media practice, with the performance of the media, whether print, broadcast or online, being uniformly problematic. Plagiarism was a nagging problem, together with sensationalism, lack of fairness and balance, biased reporting, and corruption.

Read full article @ panaynewsphilippines.com

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