Tag Archives: PhilRights

[Off-the-shelf] The Killing State: 2019 Philippine Human Rights Situationer -PhilRights

Halfway through the Duterte regime, the human rights situation in the Philippines continued its descent to violence, fear, and impunity.

In 2019, three years into President Rodrigo Duterte’s rule, the strongman’s impulse for violence manifested itself through even more harmful and lethal means. The continuation of the so-called war on drugs, the escalation of attacks against human rights defenders, activists, and the media, and the disregard for social and economic justice has festered into a full-blown human rights crisis.

This report, a product of a yearlong effort to monitor and analyze developments impacting the human rights and dignity of Filipinos, is an opportunity to confront our country’s worsening reality—one where an autocratic regime so boldly circumvents the State’s obligations to the dignity and well-being of its people.

Beyond chronicling the contours and dimensions of this crisis, we aspire for action. We believe that our people, guided by the ideals and principles of human rights and democratic rule, can seize this country from the clutches of authoritarianism and work towards a society where their innate dignity as human beings is valued.

Prof. Nymia Pimentel-Simbulan
Executive Director

Click the link below to read more:

THE KILLING STATE: 2019 PHILIPPINE HUMAN RIGHTS SITUATIONER

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[Press Release] Report: Worsened human rights crisis in 2019; Duterte’s real legacy is full-scale assault on people’s rights -PhilRights

Photo from PhilRights FB page

PhilRights’ report The Killing State: 2019 Philippine Human Rights Situationer describes a worsening human rights situation creating a hostile environment for ordinary Filipinos.

QUEZON CITY – President Duterte’s real legacy is the full-scale assault on people’s basic rights and the dismantling of democratic guarantees of Filipinos, the Philippine Human Rights Information Center (PhilRights) asserted.

“If we talk of Duterte’s real legacy, his administration needs to look no further than the thousands of dead bodies found in city streets and the countryside,” said Prof. Nymia Pimentel-Simbulan, executive director of PhilRights.

PhilRights’ conclusion was based on its new report released today, which outlined how the human rights situation in the Philippines continued its descent to violence, fear, and impunity, festering into a full-blown human rights crisis.

Prof. Pimentel-Simbulan noted that Pres. Duterte’s core principle of governance is violence, which is manifested through the continuation of the so-called war on drugs, the escalation of attacks on human rights defenders, activists, and the media, and the disregard for social and economic justice.

“The president’s impulse for violence has had a profoundly negative impact on the rights and dignity of many Filipinos,” said Prof. Pimentel-Simbulan. She questioned the government’s continued anti-human rights agenda including the push to reimpose the death penalty, which is in direct violation of the Philippines’ obligations to international human rights law.

2019: A Human Rights Crisis

PhilRights’ report looked back at key events in 2019 that impacted the human rights situation in the country and found that the demonization of human rights, coupled with weaponization of laws and the constant incitement of violence by the president himself have created a hostile environment for ordinary Filipinos.

Of particular concern is the widespread violence perpetrated by the ongoing anti-drug campaign and the implementation of Memorandum No. 32 and Executive Order No. 70, among other issuances, which have resulted in escalating attacks against human rights defenders, activists, and the media.

The report also highlighted the administration’s failure to deliver on its promises of genuine improvement in the lives of Filipinos, especially on issues of food security, employment, and our farmers’ plight under the Rice Tariffication Law. “In 2019, it became even more clear that this administration is massively beholden to the interests of the powerful few, at the expense of the economic, social, and cultural rights of our citizens,” said Prof. Pimentel-Simbulan.

Fighting back

PhilRights views 2020 as an important year in the fight for human rights. The group noted the upcoming report of United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the human rights situation in the Philippines in June and the anticipated decision of the International Criminal Court’s Office of the Prosecutor on whether to proceed with a full investigation into allegations of crimes against humanity against Pres. Duterte and other administration officials.

In the report, Prof. Pimentel-Simbulan emphasized the need for action: “We believe that our people, guided by the ideals of principles of human rights and democratic rule, can seize this country from the clutches of authoritarianism.”

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About PhilRights

PhilRights is a non-stock, non-profit organization duly registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Established in 1991 as the research and information center of the Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA), PhilRights is also an associated NGO of the United Nations Department of Public Information (UN DPI) and carry a special consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (UN ECOSOC).

PhilRights envisions a just, democratic, peaceful and prosperous Philippines founded on a culture of human rights and gender equity. Our work is focused on ushering in a society where each individual is able to fully realize their potential as a human person, participates effectively in the economic, political and cultural life, and shares equitably in the benefits of economic progress.

Our institutional programs are Human Rights research, education, and information. For more information, please visit http://www.philrights.org.

Facebook: @HumanRightsPhilippines | Twitter and Instagram: @PhilRights | Youtube: /PhilRights

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc.

[From the web] Women in the Margins Summit Kicks Off 18 Days of Activism Against VAW -PhilRights

The Commission on Human Rights (CHR) held its first Summit Against Gender-based Violence on November 25, in time for the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women.

The Summit kicked off CHR’s observation of the 18 Days of Activism, a nationwide campaign to end violence against women that also covers the International Women Human Rights Defenders Day on November 29, Human Rights Day on December 10, and International Day Against Trafficking on December 12.

Reports show that criminal acts against women and girls remain pervasive worldwide, both within households and in public institutions.

According to the 2017 National Demographic and Health Survey, one out of four married women in the Philippines has experienced abuse from their former or current partners. Only a slim one-third of these women sought help, reaching out to their families (65%) and friends (18%) rather than authorities such as the CHR.

CHR Commissioner Karen Gomez-Dumpit also explained that women and girls also account for 71% of all human trafficking victims worldwide, with three out of four of these women and girls having been or being sexually exploited.

Gomez-Dumpit noted how the statistics do not align well with the Philippines’ reputation as one of the “most gender-equal countries in Asia,” with the country even placing 8th in the 2018 Global Gender Gap Report.

Key legislation protecting women have also been in place for more than a decade, with the Anti-Violence Against Women and Children (VAWC) Act of 2004 and the Magna Carta of Women from 2009.

CHR highlighted “voices of the most vulnerable and marginalized” for its first-ever Summit Against Gender-based Violence, inviting community women from all over the country to participate in the discussion and speak about their current conditions.

Click the link below to read more:

Women in the Margins Summit Kicks Off 18 Days of Activism Against VAW

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[Off-the-shelf] The Killing State: The Unrelenting War Against Human Rights -PhilRights

Findings of the 2017-2019 Documentation of Extrajudicial Killings (EJK) committed in the context of the so-called War on Drugs
by the Philippine Human Rights Information Center

Since Rodrigo Duterte’s inauguration as the 16th president of the Philippines in 2016, the country has witnessed a steep surge in gross violations of human rights. Three years into his presidency, President Duterte’s so-called war on drugs continues without letup, despite his own admission that the drug problem has not been—and cannot be—solved.

The number of victims continues to mount and the violence and brutality are just as severe. Extrajudicial killings (EJKs) have become the hallmark of the Duterte administration’s governance.

The challenges to human rights organizations are as urgent as ever: to respond to the rise in cases of gross human rights violations, to provide support and intervention to victims and families, to campaign for rule of law and respect for human rights, and to fight against impunity. Among these challenges is the urgent task of documenting the cases of violations, so that they are not erased from public memory, and to gather evidence that could be used for exacting accountability.

PhilRights’ documentation abides by the principles and investigation guidelines set by The Minnesota Protocol on the Investigation of Potentially Unlawful Deaths (2016).2 This document, also known as the Minnesota Protocol, was issued by the Office of the United Nations High Commission for Human Rights (OHCHR) to set international legal standards to prevent unlawful deaths and investigate extra-legal, summary, and arbitrary executions.

The Minnesota Protocol clarifies that a “potentially unlawful death” may (1) have been due to the acts or omission of the State, its organs or agents including law enforcers, paramilitary groups, militias or death squads allegedly “acting under the direction or with the permission or acquiescence of the State,” and “private military or security forces exercising State functions,” (2) have happened when the victim was in detention by or in custody of the State, its organs or agents, and (3) have been due to the failure of the State to fulfill its obligation in protecting life. Under international law, a “potentially unlawful death” is the product of an arbitrary, summary, or extra-legal execution or an alleged extrajudicial killing. In the event that the victim survived the incident, the violation is referred to as “frustrated or attempted extrajudicial killing.”

Click the link to read more:

The Killing State: The Unrelenting War Against Human Rights

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[From the web] Duterte’s drug war is a war against human rights -PhilRights

PhilRights’ documentation of alleged EJK cases reveals that human rights violations committed against the victims of alleged EJKs, their families, and their communities are systemic, coordinated, sequential, and comprehensive.
QUEZON CITY – More than being a war on the poor, Duterte’s drug war is ‘an unrelenting war against human rights,’ the Philippine Human Rights Information Center (PhilRights) asserted.

PhilRights’ conclusion was based on its new report released today, “The Killing State: An Unrelenting War Against Human Rights in the Philippines,” a study that explores the demographics of victims of alleged extrajudicial killings (EJKs), the modalities and patterns of the killings, as well as other gross human rights violations associated with the Duterte government’s ‘war on drugs.’

According to PhilRights, there is already enough evidence to conclude that the drug war has resulted in gross and interrelated human rights violations that extended to the families and communities of those who have been killed.

Click the link to read more:

https://www.facebook.com/notes/philippine-human-rights-information-center-philrights/dutertes-drug-war-is-a-war-against-human-rights/2459218037465998/

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos, etc.

[from the web] Understanding the UNHRC Resolution on human rights in the Philippines -PhilRights

A recent survey by the Social Weather Stations (SWS) found that 60% of adult Filipinos agreed that the government should not block the investigation of international groups into drug-related killings.

While the result was a product of field interviews held in June for the pollster’s Second Quarter 2019 Social Weather Survey, it coincided neatly with the July adoption of an Iceland-led resolution before the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC). The resolution requested the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet to prepare and present a “comprehensive written report” on the human rights situation in the Philippines.

Strong public support for international involvement and, correspondingly, the international community’s willingness to engage the Philippine government through the UN system both bode well in clarifying the State’s accountabilities on the thousands of killings that has occurred in relation to the so-called war on drugs as well as the general human rights situation in the country.

To further understand the resolution, and what it means for human rights in the Philippines under Pres. Duterte, PhilRights reached out to two key figures who were part of the mission in Geneva which lobbied for the resolution’s adoption: Ellecer Carlos, of the In Defense of Human Rights and Dignity Movement (iDEFEND), and Rose Trajano, of the Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA).

Click the link to read more:

Understanding the UNHRC Resolution on human rights in the Philippines

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Include your full name, e-mail address, and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

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[From the web] 4Ps and Human Rights Series Part 2: 4Ps’ Impact on Children’s Rights and Women’s Rights -PhilRights.org

4Ps and Human Rights Series Part 2: 4Ps’ Impact on Children’s Rights and Women’s Rights
by Isaac Linco

ABOUT THIS SERIES: It has been over 11 years since the inception of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps). This three-part series examines the ways it has or has not addressed the progressive realization of human rights of poor Filipinos, specifically their economic, social and cultural rights.

Part 2 summarizes the results of studies on the impact on children’s rights and women’s rights of the 4Ps program.

Part 2: 4Ps’ Impact on Children’s Rights and Women’s Rights
Given that the conditionalities of 4Ps center on education and health of children and pregnant women, the most studied aspects focus on the program’s impacts in these areas. Below is a summary of studies on the emerging impacts addressed by this program for these rights.

Read full article @philrights.org

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[Off-the-shelf] Philippine Human Rights Situationer 2018 -PhilRights

Philippine Human Rights Situationer 2018

In his third State of the Nation Address (SONA), President Rodrigo Roa Duterte revealed once again his blinkered view of human rights. In justifying his government’s bloody campaign against illegal drugs, the president doubled-down on his critique of human rights advocates who speak out against his kill policies. This pithy soundbite, then echoed by his supporters in and outside of government, belies the essential truth: that human rights and human lives cannot be separated from each other. Indeed, the very essence of human life is human rights.

Read full article @philrights.org

Submit your contribution online through HRonlinePH@gmail.com
Include your full name, e-mail address and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[Statement] PhilRights Statement During the Public Hearing on the Re-imposition of the Death Penalty in the Philippines

PhilRights Statement During the Public Hearing on the Re-imposition of the Death Penalty in the Philippines

Vote for this article for the 5th HR Pinduteros’ Choice Awards

The Philippine Human Rights Information Center (PhilRights) stands witho ther defenders of human rights and advocates of human dignity in opposing the re-imposition of the death penalty in the Philippines for the following reasons:

Philrights logo

1.     On June 24, 2006,the Philippine Congress enacted Republic Act 9346, prohibiting the imposition of the death penalty in the Philippines.This landmark legislation was lauded not only by Filipinos but also by the international community as a sign of the country’s commitment to life and human dignity.

2.     On November 20, 2007, the Philippines, through the Philippine Senate, ratified the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. This Protocol aims to abolish the death penalty, with all States parties who have ratified the Protocol being convinced that all measures of abolition of the death penalty should be considered as progress in the enjoyment of the right to life.”

3.     For the information of this Committee, the Philippines, as a signatory to this Protocol, has expressly agreed that “No one within the jurisdiction of a State Party to the present Protocol shall be executed. Each State Party shall take all necessary measures to abolish the death penalty within its jurisdiction.” (Article 1, paragraphs 1 and 2)

4.     By ratifying this Protocol, the Philippines affirmed its commitment to the right to life and joined the international community in working for the enhancement and progressive realization of human rights. If the Philippines re-imposes capital punishment, it would be breaking its commitment to international human rights standards to which it had previously affirmed.

5.     In the same vein,the Philippines co-sponsored and voted for a series of United Nations General Assembly Resolutions in 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2012 which calls for a moratorium on the use of the death penalty and urged States to respect international standards that protect the rights of those facing the death penalty, to progressively restrict its use and reduce the number of offences which are punishable by death.

6.     As recently as October 10, 2014, in keeping with the celebration of the World Day against the Death Penalty, the Philippines again led the global movement for universal abolition when, along with eleven other States, it signed the International Joint Declaration urging other States to abolish the death penalty.

There is no place for state-sanctioned killing in a modern justice system. PhilRights has always been firm in the belief that the death penalty is not the best deterrent to crime, as empirical evidence has proven time and again; instead, it can lead to the commission of a crime, when, for example, an innocent person is condemned to death. The risk of such a miscarriage of justice, for which there is no possible restitution or reparation, is always present even in the most ideal judicial system.

It is for this very reason that the trend is towards the universal abolition of the death penalty. Even in countries where the death penalty has yet to be abolished, they have either ended it in practice (by declaring an official moratorium or by not carrying out executions) or taken steps to narrow its scope. It will be embarrassing for the Philippines to espouse universal abolition at the international arena while taking thousands of steps back to the dark ages of state-sanctioned executions.

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[Announcement] The Philippine Human Rights Information Center (PhilRights), a non-governmental organization, is in need of a *Research Associate*

The Philippine Human Rights Information Center (PhilRights), a
non-governmental organization, is in need of a *Research Associate*.

Philrights logo

*Qualifications*

a) Must be a graduate of any social science or arts and letters degree
or equivalent years of experience in human rights or development work;

b) Has very good communication skills especially writing and editing
abilities;

c) With at least one-year experience in research work;

d) Computer and information technology literate and desktop publishing
competent;

e) Can work with minimal supervision and a team player.

*Job Description*

As Research Associate, the Employee shall:

1. Spearhead the institution’ s databanking activities;

2. Engage in gathering of secondary materials on the research problem
and related topics through library, internet research, among others;

3. Conduct and/or assist in conducting primary data-collection
activities like focus group discussions, key informant interviews,
etc. of identified key stakeholders, experts, etc.;

4. Process and/or organize secondary and primary data gathered;

5. Assist in writing research results;

6. Assist in disseminating research findings; and

7. Perform other tasks assigned from time to time.

Interested parties may send their (a) resumes, (b) application letter
addressed to Dr. Nymia Pimentel Simbulan, Executive Director, and (c)
sample works thru e-mail (philrights@philrights.org)

For further inquiries, please contact Ms. Josie Flores, 433-1714 or
426-4048.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[Statement] PhilRights Statement on the Right to Adequate Food Framework Bill (HB 3795)

PhilRights Statement on the Right to Adequate Food Framework Bill (HB 3795)

Photo by FIAN

Photo by FIAN

The Philippine Human Rights Information Center (PhilRights), a non-government organization actively engaged in human rights research, education and information work, supports the Right to Adequate Food Framework Bill and calls upon Members of the Philippine Congress to urgently enact the bill into law.

What makes the bill unique and significant? It is a bill that provides a framework, a perspective on why the right to adequate food should be fulfilled by the State and the approach and manner of how the right to adequate food should be met. And that is the rights-based approach (RBA).

The right to adequate food is a human right recognized by the Philippines by virtue of its ratification of several key international human rights laws, namely the International Covenant on Economic, Social & Cultural Rights (Art. 11), Convention on the Rights of the Child (Art. 24.2c), and Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (Art. 12.2). It is a right which every Filipino should enjoy by virtue of its interconnection with the realization of other human rights such as the rights to life, health, education, work, freedom of religion,association and peaceful assembly.

The passage of a law which provides the legal framework for the enjoyment of the right to adequate food by the Filipino people is highly critical for the State to comply its human rights obligation. It is essential in the development of policies, programs, projects and measures that will address the problems of hunger and malnutrition, monopoly ownership of land and other natural resources, inequitable and lack of access to sources for food production, environmental destruction, and unfair international agreements. It is an important legislation which when passed and effectively implemented will ensure the enjoyment of the right to adequate food by the Filipino people, especially the most vulnerable.

We call upon the members of the 16th Philippine Congress to perform a historic act for which they will be remembered by immediately passing the Right to Adequate Food Framework Bill. This will be a legacy which the present and future generations will substantially benefit from.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

* Read by Dr. Nymia Pimentel Simbulan during the Human Rights Committee Hearing on House Bill No. 3795, May27, 2014, Mitra Hall, House of Representatives, Batasan Pambansa, Quezon City

Photos: Astrud Beringer/FIAN Philippines

Iboto ang iyong #HRPinduterosChoice para sa HR WEBSITES.

Iboto ang iyong #HRPinduterosChoice para sa HR WEBSITES.

HR WEBSITE LOGOAng botohan ay magsisimula ngayon hanggang sa 11:59PM ng Nov 15, 2013.

IKAW PARA KANINO KA PIPINDOT? Simple lang bumoto:

  • pindutin ang inyong napupusuan sa poll button sa ibaba ng post na ito
  • i-LIKE din ang thumbnail/s ng iyong mga ibinoboto sa HRonlinePH facebook, i-share at ikampanya.
  • Most number of the combined likes sa FB at sa poll buttons ang magiging 3rd HR Pinduteros Choice na kikilalanin sa 2013 HR week celebration.

Makiisa sa pagpapalaganap ng impormasyon hinggil sa karapatang pantao. Pindot na!

WHAT IS 3RD HR PINDUTEROS CHOICE AWARDS? https://hronlineph.com/2013/10/01/3rd-human-rights-pinduteros-choice-awards/

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FINALISTS FOR HR WEBSITE

1. http://clrdc.wordpress.com

CHILDREN’S LEGAL RIGHTS AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER, INC.

1 CLRD

is a non-stock, non-profit legal resource human rights organization for children committed to advancing children’s rights and welfare through the provision of its services based on human rights developmental framework approach and methodologies.

2. http://philrights.org

PHILIPPINE HUMAN RIGHTS INFORMATION CENTER

2 PHILRIGHTS

PhilRights envisions a just, democratic, peaceful and prosperous Philippines founded on a culture of human rights and gender equity. It envisions a society where each individual is able to fully realize one’s potential as a human person, to participate effectively in the economic, political and cultural life, and to share equitably in the benefits of economic progress.

3. http://phildeafres.org

PHILIPPINE DEAF RESOURCE CENTER

3 PDRC

To serve as a nationwide center for the Filipino Deaf community, and its individual and collective stakeholders, in the various needs, challenges and issues that concern it, by:

Encouraging, conducting and commissioning RESEARCH, particularly on sign language linguistics and interpreting, employment and livelihood, education, health and counseling, policy-making and legislation, media and technology, and Deaf culture and the arts;

Gathering and providing INFORMATION through the development of materials, and their publication and dissemination by print or electronic means; and

serving as a NETWORKING support for caregivers of the Deaf, advocates for the community, and Deaf organizations.

4. http://ctuhr.org

CENTER FOR TRADE UNION AND HUMAN RIGHTS

4 CTUHR

CTUHR is committed to the cause of advancing genuine, democratic, nationalist and militant trade unionism. It is against all forms of deception and coercion that seeks to derail this cause. The Center believes that repression can and has taken on different and subtle forms like labour legislations, and flexible employment schemes, amongst others and therefore devotes herself to exposing these devious moves.

5. http://find.org.ph

FAMILIES OF VICTIMS OF INVOLUNTARY DISAPPEARANCE

5 FIND

FIND untiringly searches for the disappeared and fights for justice through participative empowerment of its members. It upholds and actively works for the protection of human rights, particularly the protection of persons from enforced or involuntary disappearance, and links arms with local and international groups working for justice and peace in the spirit of respect, trust and mutual cooperation.

6. http://amnesty.org.ph

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL

6 AIPH

is a worldwide movement of people who campaign for internationally recognized human rights to be respected and protected for everyone.

7. http://philippinehumanrights.org

PHILIPPINE ALLIANCE OF HUMAN RIGHTS ADVOCATES

7 PAHRA

PAHRA envisions a just, democratic, and peaceful Philippines founded on human rights culture. It envisions a society where there is gender equity, recognition of multiculturalism, environmental protection, and sustainable development. As such, all individuals and peoples are able to fully realize their potentials, participate and contribute in the economic, political, social and cultural life of society, and share equitably in the benefits of economic progress.

8. http://alyansatigilmina.net

ALYANSA TIGIL MINA

8 ATM

The Alyansa Tigil Mina was born out of the collective concern of Non-Government Organizations, People’s Organizations and other Civil Society Groups against the impending threat of the revitalization of the mining industry in the Philippines. In mid-2004, NGOs/ POs, decided to disengage from a series of consultations convened by the DENR regarding the revitalization of the mining industry.

9. http://humanrightsdefenderspilipinas.wordpress.com

HUMAN RIGHTS DEFENDERS–PILIPINAS

9 HRD

HRDP was born-out from the series of campaigns of civil society organizations against the rising phenomenon of extra-judicial killings of human rights workers and activists in Philippines in 2006. This was highlighted with the official visit of the UN Special Rapporteur onSummary Execution Prof. Phillip Alston in March 2007; and, its subsequent report and recommendations on the Philippines at the UN Human Rights Council.

10. http://balayph.net

BALAY REHABILITATION CENTER

10 BALAY

The word balay, in many dialects in the Philippines, means a house, a shelter or a home. The name itself depicts protection, safety, and nurturance of well-being. In the course of the organization’s existence, the word balay have also signified a space where the people can work towards empowerment and development.

[Announcement] HR ALERT! CSO-Peoples Intervention and Monitoring Mechanism (CSO-PIMM) now ready -PAHRA

Dear HRDs ,

Our web-based reporting of HRVs is now ready for use, cases could be Civil, Political, Econonic, Social and Cultural rights violations.

To access , please click on this link:

http://www.philippinehumanrights.org/index.php?option=com_chronoforms&view=form&Itemid=155

OR for a step by step access

1. Go to PAHRA website : philippinehumanrights.org

2. See revolving scroll of various colors on the upper right side of page, between ” search menu bar ” and logos of Forum Asia/FIDH and OMCT

3. Wait for a while for the RED colored box to appear : the box is tagged as HR ALERT and then click

4. The page contains a brief explanation on the CSO-PIMM

5. Scroll down and the Reporting Form is ready for use
If HRV IS ONGOING and need emergency attention — please call or text our

MOBILE HOTLINE NUMBER is 0928-713-1519
or 0906-553-1792

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Brief background of the CSO-PIMM:
Early this year PAHRA, PHILRIGHTS and TFDP launched the CSO-Peoples Intervention and Monitoring Mechanism (CSO-PIMM). Its mandate is of a comprehensive and systematic monitoring of civil, political, social, economic and cultural rights violations perpetrated directly by the State or authorized by the State.
OBJECTIVES :
1) Facilitate an effective and efficient institutionalized and well coordinate monitoring of violations
2) Develop a comprehensive updated statistics in a centralized repository readily available for all
3) Come up with analysis of processes and factors contributing to the violations and impunity
4) Facilitate/directly provide systematic and programmatic quick reaction response including para-legal/legal services, relief/immediate intervention and rehabilitation/long term response
5) Pro-active and coordinated local, national and international campaigns towards prevention of and breaking impunity

For any inquiries and comments , please call PAHRA office at 436-26-33.

justice and Human Rights for All!

PAHRA Secretariat

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[From the web] Joint Civil Society Report for the 2nd Cycle Universal Periodic Review (UPR) – www.philippinehumanrights.org

Joint Civil Society Report for the 2nd Cycle Universal Periodic Review (UPR)

This submission was prepared through facilitation of the Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA) with assistance of the Philippine Human Rights Information Center (PhilRights) in coordination with sixty-three (63) civil society organizations (see annex 1). Four (4) national workshops and consultations including one with Commission on Human Rights of the Philippines (CHRP) were conducted to gather inputs and recommendations for this report.

pahra-joint-cso-report-to-upr-nov-28-2011

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[Event] Forum on ESC rights justiciability – PAHRA/PhilRights

Greetings from PAHRA and PhilRights!

Our Human Rights Week celebration for this year, with the theme “Karapatan  para sa Lahat, Hindi Kaunlaran para sa Iilan,” is mainly focused on the economic, social, and cultural (ESC) rights violations being perpetrated by the P’noy administration due to its neo-liberal policies and programs.

The Aquino government despite its popularity due to its anti-corruption drive should be made accountable for its questionable silence and bias in favor of business and other entities that violate the rights of marginalized sectors.

Some examples of this would be the PALEA case and the large-scale mining issue.  Pnoy failed to protect workers’ rights when it upheld PAL management’s outsourcing scheme leading to the retrenchment of more than 2,000 regular workers.  Likewise, it failed to protect the rights of indigenous peoples,  small farmers and fisherfolks with the government’s aggressive policy of promoting large-scale mining resulting to numerous abuses.

Thus, as part of the Human Rights week celebration, we are inviting you to a forum on ESC rights justiciability wherein human rights violations, mostly ESC rights cases, will be presented by victims or support groups.  After this, with the help of human rights lawyers, the plenary will discuss possible legal and other means to pursue these cases in particular, and advance ESC rights justiciability in general.

The ESC Rights Justiciability Forum will be held on December 9, 2011, 1:00 to 5:00 pm at Max’s Restaurant in Quezon Memorial Circle. For more information, please contact Rose Trajano at 436-2633 or Bernie Larin at 433-1714.

Thank you very much and we look forward to your positive response.

Sincerely Yours,

Nymia Pimentel Simbulan, Dr. PH                                          Max de Mesa
Executive Director, PhilRights                                                  Chair, PAHRA

Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA)
53-B Maliksi St. Bgy. Pinyahan
Quezon City, Philippines (1100)
Tel/fax (632) 436-26-33
Mobile : 0906-553-1792
E-mail:  pahra@philippinehumanrights.org
pahracampaigns@gmail.com
Fb account: philippinehumanrights

[From the web] Gabay sa lokal na pagsubaybay at pagdodokumento sa mga lugar na apektado ng malakihang pagmimina – philrights.org

Gabay sa lokal na pagsubaybay at pagdodokumento sa mga lugar na apektado ng malakihang pagmimina.

Sa kasaysayan ng malakihang pagmimina sa bansa, makikitang tuwing papasok ito sa komunidad, kadalasan ay tumataas din ang bilang ng mga paglabag sa karapatang pantao.

Makikita ang mga paglabag na ito mula sa pagkumbinsi sa mga residenteng pumayag sa operasyon ng mina, sa reaksyon ng kumpanya at ng gobyerno sa mga pagtutol, at hanggang sa mga pagkasira at trahedyang dulot nito.

Sa ganitong sitwasyon, dapat ipagtanggol at ipaglaban ng mga residente at mga sumusuportang grupo ang kanilang mga karapatan sa iba’t ibang larangan at paraan.

Ngunit bago makapaglunsad ng mga kampanya o makapagsampa ng reklamo o kaso, kailangang makaipon ng mga impormasyon at ebidensya upang maging epektibo ang mga susunod na hakbang.

Kaya dapat bigyang importansya ng mga organisasyon ng mamamayan at sumusuportang grupo ang gawaing pagsubaybay at pagdodokumento. Nakasalalay dito ang pagkakaroon ng mga datos at mga ebidensya ng paglabag.

Read full article @ philrights.org