Tag Archives: Philippine Congress

[Statement] Pagkain Sapat Dapat! STOP HUNGER NOW! -NFC

Pagkain Sapat Dapat! STOP HUNGER NOW!

Quezon City – On the occasion of World Food Day, 16 October 2014, the National Food Coalition, a broad organization of peasants, urban poor folks, women, and youth, calls upon the Philippine Congress, to pass immediately the zero-hunger bill — House Bill No. 3795 and Senate Bill No. 2137. The House Committee on Human Rights has already had its initial hearing on the bill, and has formed a Technical Working Group to further refine its provisions and the Senate Committee on Agriculture and Food still has to call a hearing.

NFC

The National Food Coalition is fully aware and deeply concerned that the problem of hunger persists. The Social Weather Stations hunger survey among Filipino families in the second quarter of 2014 shows that 16.3% or about 3.6 million families have experienced involuntary hunger at least once during the period. About 13.5% of families have experienced moderate hunger, while 2.8% experienced severe hunger.

The state of hunger or the lack of proper nutrition is more graphically shown in the effects it has on children. The National Nutrition Survey of 2013 reports that 30.3%, or three out of 10 children 0-5 years old, are stunted. The Food and Nutrition Research Institute says that stunting results from “long-term food and nutrient deprivation that retards physical growth and cognitive development, and increases the risk to illnesses which may later affect economic productivity.” Wasting, or the low weight-for-height indicator, rose from 7.3 percent in 2011 to 7.9 percent in 2013.

The nutrition survey also reported that the prevalence of nutritionally-at-risk pregnant women remained high at 24.8% with pregnant teen-aged girls more likely to be nutritionally-at-risk at 37.2%. Nineteen out of every 100 pregnant women also were found underweight.

According to “The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2014” published by the Food and Agriculture Organization, the proportion of undernourished Filipinos to the rest of the population is 11.5%.

This hunger situation cannot continue said Aurea M. Teves, president of FIAN Philippines and convenor of the National Food Coalition. She said, it is contrary to human dignity and a violation of human rights. The government must take positive action to end hunger. The National Food Coalition urges the Philippine Congress to pass the zero-hunger bill immediately.  This bill provides a legal framework within which zero-hunger may be achieved progressively. The bill also provides an explicit guarantee to the right to adequate food, and clarifies its content, which includes food adequacy, availability, accessibility, freedom from adverse substances, and cultural or consumer acceptability. The bill also enumerates the human rights principles upon which the proposed law is based, namely, participation, accountability, non-discrimination, transparency, human dignity, empowerment, and rule of law.

The National Food Coalition is urging the Philippine government and civil society to come together and resolve firmly, as a community, to put an end to the hunger, which ultimately takes its toll on human dignity.

National Food Coalition
91 Madasalin St., Sikatuna Village,
Diliman 1101 Quezon City, Philippines
Phone: (02) 351-7553

Contact Persons:
Aurea G. Miclat-Teves – Convenor, National Food Coalition
ria.teves@yahoo.com.ph, +6323517553
Atty. Bombi Sunga – Legal Consultant
ricardo_sunga@yahoo.com, +63.917.854.2124

World Food Day 2014
16th October

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[People] False freedom and insatiable greed. By Fr. Shay Cullen

False freedom and insatiable greed
by Fr. Shay Cullen

Just before Independence Day last week, a group of newly enrolled children from a shelter excitedly set out on the first day to walk to school at Gala, Sacatihan, Pamatawan, Subic town, Zambales. The road up the hill would give them an easy walk to freedom through education – the great liberator. But then, as they crested the hill, to their dismay the asphalt abruptly ended. The rains had turned the rest of the way into a muddy quagmire that had the children squelching their way through ankle-deep sticky mud, symbolic of the political corruption, waste and abuse that mires almost one-third of the Filipinos in pitiless, grinding poverty from which there is no freedom.

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Like thousands of others, the road is a fake or ghost project that had never been fully built. Even urgent requests to the governor to throw gravel from the exposed river bed on to the muddy road are so far unheeded. The children suffer and it became so bad in the past week that 26 children transferred to another school.

This mess and the plunder and looting of public funds at the highest level of the Congress as the headlines announce daily is just one, very small indicator of a greater harm done to the people by some depraved and greedy politicians. How many more fake and fraudulent infrastructure projects are there like the one in Gala, Subic? There is no freedom from greed, it seems.

Besides these small, allegedly corruption-ridden projects, the extremely wealthy ruling elite in the Philippine Congress have allegedly plundered and looted billions of pesos from the treasury. Three prominent Senators have been charged, arrest warrants are imminent and many Congress people will join them in jail. Their “jails” are posh, luxurious tiled, well, appointed bungalows built for ranking officers.

They are incomparable to the stinking jail cells where the hungry street children are incarcerated, abused, beaten and raped for taking a banana in the market. The indictments by the Aquino administration are a glimmer of hope that change is possible but with billions of bribes at hand, justice is likely to be thwarted and they will never answer for these alleged crimes. These funds came from the taxes imposed on the people especially the 17 to 20 percent VAT that were supposed to be used for rural development to alleviate poverty and build barangay roads to bring the children to school.

Independence Day last June 12 was to celebrate the political freedom of a nation from colonial domination and exploitation. It’s a tortured history. First, the impoverished oppressed Filipinos struggled for liberation from the Spanish and almost succeeded. On the eve of independence, the North Americans declared war on the Spanish, landed troops in Manila in 1898 and took over, then sent home the defeated Spanish. The Filipinos fought back but after a few years of bitter war marked by atrocities, the American forces conquered them. They subdued and tamed most of the Filipinos, then the Japanese invaded and ousted the Americans in World War II. The people suffered greatly and the Japanese were eventually defeated and again the Filipinos struggled for independence from the United States of America and in 1947, they got it with string attached. But was it real freedom?

They got political independence and a lot of unfair and exploitative trading arrangements and unequal treaties that enabled American corporations to exploit the country at will until the present. They were swamped with Americanization. So it was not true independence, a great dependency has been skillfully arranged. The democracy was a sham, in reality, the rich Spanish-Filipino families in close cooperation with the American corporations ruled without much opposition.

The vast majority of Filipinos remained bitterly poor peasants and isolated tribal people. Philippine natural resources were ruthlessly exploited, enabled by unequal treaties, the riches of the nation flowed across the Pacific to America. The people were exported also. Filipino overseas workers flowed to the pineapple plantations of Hawaii to work in slave-like conditions.

Little has changed. Eleven million Filipinos still go abroad to find economic freedom. The majority live with 25% unemployment and the freedom from poverty for the majority of Filipinos is still a dream. The economic news may boast of 7% economic growth but that is only for the oligarchy who have 70 percent of the wealth in their pockets.

To quote from an Editorial in a national broad-sheet of March of last year: “The increase in the wealth of the 40 richest families in the Philippines that made it to the 2012 Forbes list of the world’s billionaires accounted for 76 percent of the growth of the gross domestic product (GDP). It’s one of the biggest rich-poor gaps in the free world and”, Habito observed, “the highest in Asia”. That is what they call “independence”. [shaycullen@preda.org, http://www.preda.org]

(Fr. Shay’s columns are published in The Manila Times, in publications in Ireland, the UK, Hong Kong, and on-line.)

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[Events] Activities in commemoration of the INTERNATIONAL WEEK OF THE DISAPPEARED- AFAD/FIND

INTERNATIONAL WEEK OF THE DISAPPEARED
May 27 -31, 2013

FIND AFAD
Dear Friends:

The Families of Victims of Involuntary Disappearance (FIND), the International Coalitions Against Enforced Disappearances (ICAED) and the Asian Federation Against Involuntary Disappearances (AFAD are organizing two activities in commemoration of the INTERNATIONAL WEEK OF THE DISAPPEARED (May 27 -31, 2013).

The May 28 Roundtable Discussion on Restitution for the Victims of Enforced Disappearance which will be held at the Minority Hall of the Philippine Congress from 2 to 5 pm, aims to bring together various stakeholders to come up with a common understanding of the concept of restitution and to identify its different forms and the necessary operational mechanisms for its provisions.

The May 30 Roundtable Discussion (RTD) on the Lobby Efforts for the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance which will be held at the Blue Room of the Ateneo Professional Schools, Rockwell, Makati City from 9:00 to 11:30 am, aims to discuss the complementation of the lobby work of human rights NGOs and the diplomatic community for possible accession to ICPAPED by the Philippine government.

WE SHALL TRULY APPRECIATE IT IF YOU CAN TAKE PART IN THIS AFOREMENTIONED EVENTs.
THANK YOU.

For inquiry, please contact:

Mr. Darwin Mendiola
Mobile No. 0917.8968459
Office Phone No. 490.7862

Email address: afad@surfshop.net.ph

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[Statement] Remembering the Disappeared Without Graves to Visit…-AFAD

Remembering the Disappeared Without Graves to Visit…

All Souls’ Day, also known as Day of Remembrance of the dearly departed, is commemorated mostly by Catholics all over the world every 2nd day of November. Literatures describe it as a day of “solemn feast” , of visiting the tombs of loved ones in the cemetery where prayers are offered along with fresh flowers and lit candles. It is a day characterized as a collective activity where families and friends gather together to remember the dearly departed. Other cultures make the occasion festive with food, colorful altars with photos of the dead and other memorabilia.

Countries where Catholics are the majority, like the Philippines and Timor Leste, declare All Souls’ Day a national holiday so that relatives can visit their loved ones in the cemeteries. All Souls’ Day is also called differently by many languages. The Czechs call it “Commemoration of All the Departed” . Other cultures refer to it as Day of the Dead, translated as Día de los Muertos for Mexicans, Halottak Napja for Hungarians and Dia de Finados for Brazilians. Poles regard All Souls’ Day as zaduszki, a day when all the windows and doors are opened to welcome the spirits of the dead .

Named and commemorated in various ways, All Souls’ Day is a significant occasion. For the relatives and friends of the disappeared, who have no graves to visit, remembering and honoring their missing loved ones is important for grieving and healing. They visit memorials, monuments, mock graves to pray and light candles for their loved ones.

Victims of enforced disappearances, as defined by the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearances are those “ arrested, detained, abducted or subjected to any other form of deprivation of liberty by agents of the State or by persons or groups of persons acting with the authorization, support or acquiescence of the State, followed by a refusal to acknowledge the deprivation of liberty or by concealment of the fate or whereabouts of the disappeared person, which place such a person outside the protection of the law.”

The United Nations Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances (UNWGEID) reported that enforced disappearances are a major human rights concern in 94 countries. In 2011, UNWGEID reported of 53, 788 outstanding cases and more are being disappeared, especially in Asia.
The agonies experienced by relatives and friends of the disappeared are multi-faceted especially because the state of the victims of enforced disappearances remains uncertain – whether they are still alive or may have died. Relatives face the grim reality of uncertainty each day until the victim surfaces, or his/her dead body has been recovered and given a decent burial.

For families and friends of the disappeared who have accepted the possibility of death for their missing kin, All Souls’ Day is an occasion to join with the rest of the believers who offer prayers for their departed loved ones. They partake of the communal ritual of offering prayers and of remembering the many ways by which their loved ones touched their lives and of drawing inspiration from these memories. For some, this is a ritual that gives strength in their continued search for their disappeared loved ones and in their demand for justice and accountability from State authorities.

In this case, memorial sites for the disappeared are important for relatives and friends to spend solemn time with, gather together as a family where they can offer prayers and flowers; light candles. The AFAD calls on governments in Asia and the rest of the world to respect the right of the relatives for spaces to remember and honor their missing loved ones.

For those who are still hopeful that their missing kin are alive, All Souls’ Day can be interpreted as a Day of Remembering -a Day of Prayer in their search for TRUTH and JUSTICE. It is a Day of HOPE, that one day, the perpetrators of this cruellest form of human rights violation will be arrested, prosecuted and meted the corresponding punishment. This can only be possible when the enforced disappearance is defined as a crime in the country’s penal code, perpetrators be punished accordingly and families be accorded of the right to know the truth; to reparation and rehabilitation and guarantees of non-repetition.

Thus, the Asian Federation Against Enforced Disappearances (AFAD) calls on President Simeon Benigno Aquino III to immediately sign the Anti-Enforced Disappearance Act of 2012 recently ratified by both chambers of the Philippine Congress. To date, there are 2,201 documented cases of enforced disappearances (according to Families of Victims of Enforced Disappearances) that happened since the Marcos administration, including 17 under the current administration. The families are hoping that justice can be served for their loved ones under the government of President “Noynoy” Aquino.

On this occasion, as AFAD joins all families of the disappeared in commemorating this significant day, it calls on Asian governments to criminalize enforced disappearance in their respective penal codes; sign and ratify the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance without further delay and recognize the competence of the Committee Against Enforced Disappearances.

Signed by:

MUGIYANTO, Chairperson

MARY AILEEN D. BACALSO, Secretary-General

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[From the web] A Huge Step Towards Ending Impunity -AFAD

A Huge Step Towards Ending Impunity

The Philippine Congress has made a huge step in instituting legal measures for better human rights protection as conferees from both chambers of the Philippine Congress ratified on 16 October 2012 the bicameral report on reconciled bill which will very soon become the Anti-Enforced or Involuntary Disappearance Act of 2012.

The Asian Federation Against Enforced Disappearances (AFAD), a regional federation of human rights organizations working directly on the issue of enforced disappearances in the Asian region, hails the firm resolve of the members of the Philippine Congress for finally heeding to the call of the families and relatives of the victims who, for almost two decades, have been lobbying the Philippine Congress to criminalize and penalize the act of enforced disappearance and eventually put an end to this odious practice.

The reconciled Anti-Enforced Disappearance bill defines the crime of enforced disappearance as “the arrest, detention, abduction or any form of deprivation of liberty committed by agents of the State or by persons or groups acting with the authorization, support or acquiescence of the State followed by a refusal to acknowledge the deprivation of liberty or by concealment of the fate or whereabouts of the disappeared person, which place such a person outside the protection of the law.”

The bill prescribes penalties ranging from arresto mayor to reclusion perpetua, depending on the gravity of the acts committed. Under the approved bill, the rights of the victims and their families are guaranteed especially the right to know the truth of what happened to their loved ones and the rights to compensation, rehabilitation and restitution of dignity and to guarantees of non-repetition. Further, the bill provides the continuing character of the crime, thus, applicable to past cases. For as long as there is no certainty of the fate and whereabouts of the disappeared persons, the victims continue to be deprived of their rights to life and liberty and their families continue to suffer.

We urge President Benigno Aquino III to sign this very important piece of legislation with dispatch as soon as the Philippine Congress transmits it to Malacanang Palace for his signature. Signing it will show the Philippine government’s commitment to uphold the rights of every person to be protected from enforced disappearance which, to date, still remains prevalent. Further, the future anti-enforced disappearance law in the Philippines will be the first in Asia – a very good example for neighboring Asian governments to follow.

The Philippines is not yet a signatory much less a State-Party to the Convention despite committing to do it in a voluntary pledge before the UN Human Rights Council when it ran for membership in 2007. In the second cycle of the Universal Period Review of the Philippines in May 2010, the Philippine government stated that the imminent enactment of an anti-enforced disappearance law will expedite the government’s position favorable to the signing and ratification of the Convention.

The Asian Federation Against Involuntary Disappearances therefore, deems it equally important for President Aquino to sign and ratify the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance (Convention). The Convention and the Bill are complementary measures which, if acted upon by the government, would serve as major steps towards ensuring state accountability and ending impunity. Doing so would serve as momentous opportunity for the President to make a strong statement on its human rights policy by holding accountable those responsible for the disappearances since Martial law up to the present.

We congratulate all those who have contributed to make this major step possible even as we continuously encourage human rights groups and the general public to participate in consultations and in the formulation of rules and regulations for the effective implementation of the law.

Our almost two decades of struggle to end enforced disappearances has finally borne fruit in this imminent Anti-Enforced Disappearance Act of 2012. Once enacted into law, let this be fully implemented in its letter and spirit and let it be complemented by the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance which the Philippines has soon to accede without further delay.

Towards a world without desaparecidos, we say NO to enforced disappearances and impunity!

Signed by:

MARY AILEEN D. BACALSO                                        MUGIYANTO
Secretary-General                                                              Chairperson
Asian Federation Against Involuntary Disappearances
Rooms 310-311, Philippine Social Science Center Bldg.
Commonwealth Ave., Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines
Telefax: 00-63-2-4546759
Telephone: 00-63-2-4907862
Mobile: 00-63-9177924058
Website: http://www.afad-online.org

AFAD Statement on the Ratification by the Philippine Congress
of the Anti-enforced Disappearance Bill
19 October 2012

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[In the news] Justice and Welfare Consciousness Week -InterAksyon.com

Justice and Welfare Consciousness Week’
By InterAksyon.com
October 20, 2012

MANILA, Philippines — President Benigno Aquino III has declared the fourth week of October as the annual Juvenile Justice and Welfare Consciousness Week to highlight the rights of the Filipino youth.

In an interview over dzRB on Saturday, deputy Malacanang spokesperson Abigail Valte said Aquino signed Proclamation No. 489 on October 11. The proclamation cites Section 13, Article II of the 1987 Constitution, which provides that the state shall protect the physical, moral, spiritual, intellectual, and social well-being of the Filipino youth, inculcate patriotism and nationalism and encourage their involvement in public and civic affairs.

The Philippines is one of the 31 parties that have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Read full article @ www.interaksyon.com

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[Event] A march to inform, inspire, remember the people’s struggles against Martial Law -#RememberML@40!

Dear Human Rights Advocates and Defenders,

#RememberML@40!
A march to inform, inspire, remember the people’s struggles against Martial Law
Join us this Monday (May 21, 2012)
@ 7a.m. – 9 a.m.
Camp CrameCamp Aguinaldo

The families of Martial Law victims andHuman Rights Defenders will gather to Inform, Inspire and to Remember Martial Law 40 years after it was first declared on September 21, 1972 by the ousted Dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

In time with the forthcoming International Week for Commemoration of Desaparecidos, (May 28-June 3) we remember those who are victims of enforced disappearance during the dim ML days and continue to struggle for those who are also victims after.

This activity is a continuation of our national campaign to Remember ML @ 40. Every 21st of the month, from March 21 until September 21 of this year, we shall strive to have our country’s younger generation remember the dark years of the martial law period through sharing of experiences of struggles and a march.

The overall aim of this campaign is to compel the Philippine Congress to urgently pass the Compensation Bill for Victims of Human Rights Violation almost three decades after the Marcos Dictatorship was forcefully terminated through a successful People’s Power Uprising on February 25, 1986.

PLEASE WEAR BLACK
Meeting Place: EDSA corner Santolan Road

For more information and/or details, please contact:
Rose Trajano (PAHRA) and Egay Cabalitan (TFDP)
@celfone #: 0906-553-1792/0921-964-5017 office #: 436-26-33/437-8054

[Petition] A people’s petition calling on the Philippine Congress to urgently pass a bill to compensate all victims of human rights violations during the Marcos dictatorship

Aa people’s petition calling on the Philippine Congress to urgently pass a bill to compensate all victims of human rights violations during the Marcos dictatorship

21 April 2012

WHEREAS, the Philippines is a Charter-State of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and is, therefore, duty-bound to protect and uphold the basic rights of all its peoples;

WHEREAS, Section 11 of Article II of the 1987 Constitution of the Republic of the Philippines declares that the State values the dignity of every human person and guarantees full respect for human rights;
WHEREAS, pursuant to this declared policy, Section 12 of Article III of the Constitution prohibits the use of torture, force, violence, threat, intimidation, or any other means which vitiate the free will and mandates the compensation and rehabilitation of victims of torture or similar practices and their families;

WHEREAS, by virtue of Section 2 of Article II of the Constitution adopting generally accepted principles of international law as part of the law of the land, the Philippines must also adhere to international human rights laws and conventions, including the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), the Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT), and also the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearances (ICPAPED);

WHEREAS, consistent with the foregoing, it is hereby declared the policy of the State to recognize the heroism and sacrifices of all Filipinos who were victims of summary execution, torture, enforced or involuntary disappearance and other gross human rights violations committed during the dictatorial rule of Ferdinand Marcos covering the period September 21, 1972 to February 25, 1986 and restore the victims’ honor and dignity;

#Remember ML@40 – Never Again to Martial Law!

WHEREAS, the State hereby acknowledges its moral and legal obligation to recognize and/or compensate said victims and/or their families for the deaths, injuries, sufferings, deprivations, and damages they suffered under the Marcos Dictatorship;

THEREFORE, We, the undersigned human rights organizations, human rights defenders, people’s organizations, non-government organizations, and other concerned individuals, especially victims of Martial Law, do hereby call on the Philippine Senate and the House of Representatives to both jointly, urgently and immediately pass a ‘Compensation Act to Victims of Human Rights Violations During the Marcos Dictatorship’; and

FURTHERMORE, We also call on all of our country’s young people, youth and students, young workers, community youth, young professionals, and together with all the other basic sectors of Philippine society, to not only sign this ‘People’s Petition Calling on the Philippine Congress to Urgently Pass a Bill to Compensate all Victims of Human Rights Violations During the Marcos Dictatorship’ but, to also help ‘Inform, Inspire and Remember Martial Law after 40 years’. The latter should be one of our primary collective missions in order to prevent any future emergence of a state and society that could once again embrace a brutal militarist dictatorship to undermine and destroy our basic human rights.

CLICK TO SIGN AND DOWNLOAD PETITION TO INVITE OTHERS TO SIGN @ A PEOPLE’S PETITION RE THE COMPENSATION BILL

Submit your signed petition @ pahra@philippinehumanrights.org

[Event] We jog, we run, we walk, we bike, we fly kites, we share stories, we #rememberML@40

#RememberML@40!

Join us this Saturday (April 21, 2012)
@ 7a.m. – 10a.m.
U.P. Diliman – Sunken Garden

PAHRA (Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates),
families of Martial Law victims and other
Human Rights Defenders will gather to Inform, Inspire and to Remember Martial Law 40 years after it was first declared on September 21, 1972 by the ousted
Dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

This activity is a continuation of our national campaign to Remember ML @ 40.
Every 21st of the month, from March 21 until September 21 of this year,
we shall strive to have our country’s younger generation remember the
dark years of the martial law period through a series of
jogging-running-walking-biking-kite flying, and sharing activities.

The overall aim of this campaign is to compel the Philippine Congress to urgently pass the Compensation Bill for Victims of Human Rights Violation almost three decades after the Marcos Dictatorship was forcefully terminated through a successful People’s Power Uprising on February 25, 1986.

For more information and/or details, please contact:
Mr. RASTI DELIZO (PAHRA-Campaigns Staff Volunteer)
@celfone #: 099908092461/office #: 436-26-33

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[In the news] ‘Anti-Corporal Punishment bill may be first in Asia’ – PhilStar.com

‘Anti-Corporal Punishment bill may be first in Asia
By Helen Flores, The Philippine Star
January 21, 2012

 MANILA, Philippines – The Anti-Corporal Punishment Bill passed recently in the House of Representatives but still pending at the Senate could be the first in Asia, a visiting United Nations official said yesterday.

Marta Santos Pais, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence against Children, said the proposed legislation could be the first in the continent should the Philippine Congress pass it this year.

House Bill 4455 or “An Act Promoting Positive Discipline of Children and Prohibiting Corporal Punishment” authored by Representatives Bernadette Herrera-Dy of Bagong Henerasyon party-list and Susan Yap of Tarlac was passed in 2011.

The bill seeks to promote positive discipline techniques in all settings, including the home and institutions.

Read full article @ www.philstar.com

[From the web] Overall Result of FIND’s Search and Documentation Work: November 1985 to October 2011-www.find.org.ph

Overall Result of FIND’s Search and Documentation Work: November 1985 to October 2011

The commission of the global phenomenon of enforced or involuntary disappearance remains unabated in the Philippines. Since involuntary disappearance is not yet considered a crime under Philippine laws, the 15 cases filed in court by some families with the assistance of FIND are lodged as kidnapping, murder or serious illegal detention or a combination of the last two offenses. The case of the PICOP Six in Trento, Agusan del Sur was favorably resolved on July 18, 2008 after eight long years. FIND has also supported the filing of petitions for writ of habeas corpus as well as petitions for writ of amparo by families of recent victims. The anti-disappearance bills pending before the Philippine Congress seek to define and penalize the act of enforced or involuntary disappearance.

The search and documentation work of the Families of Victims of Involuntary Disappearance (FIND) has yielded the following statistics.

Read full article @ www.find.org.ph