Tag Archives: Martial Law

[From the web] BALAY shows a film that merges past & present in remembering martial law

BALAY shows a film that merges past & present in remembering martial law

The past continues to haunt nation even as it is once again confronted with a breakdown in the rule of law. This is a tragic commentary that was highlighted in the BALAY-sponsored showing of the film Respeto at the Cine Adarna Theater last Sept. 18, 2018 as part of activities to commemorate the imposition of military rule in 1972.

Respeto reflects on extra-judicial killings from the eyes of an aspiring hip-hop artist, Abra, and his reluctant mentor, an old poet living with the scars of martial law.

Directed by Treb Monteras II, the poetic lines in the film reflect the century-old ills of a society whose victims come mostly from the poorest communities. This is how films like Respeto play a role in raising consciousness to those who were not born during the Martial Law era.

“We have had enough of the trail of blood, corruption, social coercion, and lies that marks our continuing past. To collectively remember is to rise in collective indignation. To attain social healing, redress and non-repetition must prevail,” BALAY’s executive director Josephine Lascano said in her remarks at the showing.

Read full article @balayph.net

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[From the web] Artist group organizing film screenings in schools slams ‘red-tagging’ -DAKILA

Artist group organizing film screenings in schools slams ‘red-tagging’

DAKILA, the artist-activist group behind the Active Vista Human Rights Film Festival, condemns the ‘red-tagging’ of the Duterte administration of schools, youth, artists and groups organizing Martial Law-themed film screenings. DAKILA, a group known to organize film screenings complemented with discussions on social messages of the films it screens in schools, communities, cinemas, and alternative spaces, reacted after the Armed Forces of the Philippines issued a statement implicating 17 schools as part of the alleged “Red October” plot of the Communist Party of the Philippines.

According to DAKILA OIC-Executive Director Rash Caritativo, “DAKILA vehemently condemns this administration’s malicious and groundless red-tagging against students, educational institutions, and creative avenues like film screenings as part of the Duterte government’s orchestrated attack to condition the minds of the people for this looming dictatorship. “

Caritativo further claims, “In a democracy, citizens have the right to criticize the government without fear of any repercussions or their safety and well-being. The lies and groundless allegations of the government clearly intend to justify its crackdown on activists, to tag legitimate protests as acts of terrorism, and to ultimately push its tyrannical advances. This clearly impinges on our right to freedom of expression, speech and assembly, and endangers all of us – as artists, as audiences, as students, as educators, as parents, and as citizens.”

DAKILA has been organizing human rights-themed film screenings and forums in schools nationwide since 2008. It has been presenting films tackling a wide array of human rights issues from gender and reproductive health rights to children’s rights and climate justice. In the past, it has conducted nationwide roadshows of historical films like Heneral Luna and Goyo: Ang Batang Heneral which encouraged discourse on issues on our Filipino identity, national struggle for freedom, and the concept of nationhood. Every year, DAKILA holds its Active Vista Human Rights Festival which showcases the best social advocacy films.

Active Vista Executive Director Leni Velasco, said, “Attacking venues for critical discourse and education like schools and film screenings through red-tagging puts the lives of innocent civilians, especially our youth and our artists, at risk and in danger. Its real intent is to keep our people ignorant and misinformed so those in power can continue to feed lies, deceit, and a narrative that perpetuates only their self-serving interests to conceal the truth of our current social conditions.”

Velasco added, “Formal education and alternative spaces of education have important roles to play in building our nation. It provides citizens with knowledge and information, and allows them to reflect and analyze, so that they can make informed decisions about their future and contribute to nation-building. By attacking learning institutions and artistic endeavors as a form of expression and reflection, what this government wants is to keep our people divided, sow fear, and silence voices of dissent. This ‘red-tagging’ is clearly the tool of tyrants who are scared of the growing people’s resistance against dictatorship.”

Active Vista has been screening Martial Law-themed films like Citizen Jake and Respeto in schools nationwide to spark discourse on current social issues, educate students on the perils of Martial Law, and encourage critical thinking among audiences. DAKILA is a non-partisan group promoting the movement for modern heroism especially among artists and the youth.

“In times of darkness, art and education shed light to social realities that surround us. They are our ultimate weapons to reflect on our social conditions and shape our genuine path to national development,” Velasco further added.

DAKILA together with other organizations, youth and cultural groups, and artists are set to hold a Human Rights Festival to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights this December 10, 2018. The festival shall feature film screenings, performances, talks, exhibits, workshops, a youth summit, and a concert to show the united action of the people in the promotion, protection, and defense of Human Rights in the Philippines.

In ending, DAKILA’s Rash Caritativo said, “If this administration is willing to make such preposterous claims towards educational institutions, youth, educators, artists, and cultural workers, then they must also realize that they have only fueled the flames of resistance igniting in campuses and communities.”

“For every attack of this administration on our rights and freedoms, a thousand film screenings shall emerge in all spaces; artworks on social realities shall blossom; and discourse on social conditions shall flourish in schools, churches and communities, online and offline,“ she concluded.

#ResistTyranny #NoToRedTagging #ActivistsNotCriminals #CriticsNotCriminals #ResistCrackdown #NeverAgain #NeverForget #Artists4Democracy

——
DAKILA is a group of artists, students, and individuals committed to working together to creatively spark social consciousness formation towards social change.

Learn more at http://www.dakila.org.ph

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[Right-Up] Revisiting 1 Year of tyranny and social insufficiency in Mindanao -PNFSP

Revisiting 1 year of tyranny and social insufficiency in Mindanao

WE DEMAND the immediate lifting of Martial Law to end military rule that further oppressed the toiling people of Mindanao. As we observe, said year of military rule in Mindanao brought widespread human rights violations and intense militarization over the island. We would like to restate all the atrocities committed by the Duterte Administration against its own people, especially the national minorities (Lumad and Moro) and the farmers. We believe that through this mean, it will help us understand the real intention and effect/s of Martial Law.

It is very unjust to use the ghost or specter of Marawi sieged and issue in putting the whole island under Martial Law. In fact, the main reason why the President declared ML is to give and make leeway for foreign and giant corporations to mine and convert the remaining ancestral lands of the toiling Lumad and Moro’s.

History teaches us that there is no such mining operation nor aid from foreign entity in the past who respected the traditional way of life of our ancestors neither brought genuine social development. It is very sad that indigenous livelihood and food security processes is always at risk at the expense of so-called modernization. Alarmingly, said proclamation of the President served corporate interest, to control land and resources, of the exploiting class.

Instead of protecting the people’s basic universal right to healthy, sustainable and safe food, communities were heavily bombarded and militarized by the State. Massive cases of human rights violations like killings, vilifications, forced disappearances, red-tagging and other kinds of threat to their life and livelihood are experienced daily. All these are clear manifestation that the government wants to curtail people’s right to development. A pure evidence of rigid dictatorship and tyranny.

During a press conference after his SONA in July, he vowed to bombard all Lumad schools being operated by non-government organizations like the Alternative Learning Center for Livelihood and Development (ALCADEV), Center for Lumad Advocacy and Services, Inc. (CLANS), Mindanao Interfaith Services Foundation, Inc. (MISFI) and the Tribal Filipino Program for Surigao del Sur (TRIFPSS). It is alarming, because these institutions carry out socio-economic projects and livelihood programs and reforms in support to the Lumad’s struggle for their right to life and health, right to food and right to development which the government cannot do.

The President has been true to his words and without hesitation, after declaring ML, communities had been subjected to aerial bombardment and militarization that caused massive evacuation of Lumad communities. One highlighting incident was in November 26, 2017, wherein about 1,688 Lumad of at least 345 families in the town of Lianga, Surigao del Sur, had need to evacuate due to intense military operations in their area. The operation affected the realization of humanitarian aid and programs on livelihood and food security. Worst of all, the 75th IBPA checkpoint refused the entry of various food aid brought by national and international humanitarian groups at Simowao Community Learning Center where the Lumad had evacuated to avoid military operations.

Schools being heavily bombarded and militarized are Salugpongan Ta’Tanu Igkanogon Community Learning Center (SALUGPONGAN), Mindanao Interfaith Services Foundation Inc. Academy (MISFI Academy), Father Fausto Tentorio Memorial School (FFTMS), Tri-Farmers Program for Community Development (TFPCDI), Tribal Filipino Program in Surigao del Sur (TRIFPSS), Alternative Learning Center for Agricultural and Livelihood Development (ALCADEV), Center for Lumad Advocacy and Networking, Inc. Learning Center (CLANS) and Rural Missionaries of the Philippines-Lumad School Project (RMP). Said schools are active in promoting organic and sustainable agriculture in support to their community. But, because of aerial bombardment and intensified militarization, the school can no longer perform its task like providing education to actual practicum. Thus, it affects the capacity and potential building of their own community when in terms of agricultural production.

From July 2016 to March 2018, there are 8 extra-judicial killings, 6 frustrated extra-judicial killings, 36 military encampment in school and community, 49 forcible school closure, 207 threat, harassment and intimidation, 29 forcible evacuation, 13 indiscriminate firing, 4 aerial bombing, 61 vilification/ red tagging, 28 illegal arrest and detention/ filling of trump-up charges, 18 destruction/divestment of school and community property, 16 forced/fake surrender, 22 coercion, 7 torture, 15 violation of domicile, 5 physical assault/injury, 10 food blockade/ denial to humanitarian access and 1enforced disappearance incidents are recorded. Number of community, schools, teachers and students being targeted and victimized of said incidents are ranging from tens to thousands.

To sum-up, there are 535 incidents of different forms of State-sponsored human rights violations and attacks on Lumad schools and communities in four regions of Mindanao. They were committed by the State under the Duterte administration and 385 of which or 72% were committed during the reign of Martial Law in Mindanao.

These only shows that Martial Law brought extreme threat, poverty and terrorism in the context of systematic attack against people’s basic human rights, food and shelter. Under said proclamation, people can no longer do their social function like planting of crops, feeding animals, learning in schools and other social related task that provides basis for them to eat safe, healthy and sustainable food. Martial Law promoted the very contrary of progress like fear, hunger, poverty, death and suffering. If not stop, heavy destruction to life, property and economy are possible results.

We believe that each party must return to the negotiating table and talk about how to address the roots of domestic misunderstanding. The GRP must perform its duty and mandate of its own people. Promote peace, development, justice and prosperity. It must listen to the voice and cry of its farmers feeding the whole nation, to its workers building the economy, students and teachers, national minority and other oppressed sector of the Philippine society. It must show sincere passion to solve domestic crisis by peaceful means and not on the expense of democracy. For in the past, without substantial political, economic and social responses to these historic social problems, resistance will continue in various forms and way.

THERFORE, we call to all peace loving people and organization to please work hand-in-hand to lift Martial Law in Mindanao. We strongly believe to collective action and Martial Law is not the concrete nor sole answer to both poverty and social unrest. To address said problem means to start resolving food and job insufficiency in the vast countryside. The government should play its role in promoting sustainable and mechanized agriculture with pro-people orientation. At the same time, it should maximize its resources in creating more opportunities for local farmers and producers for them to be able to establish their own network and marketing. Creation of secured livelihood like just and descent work may help our countrymen to have access to right to food. On the other hand, Genuine Agrarian Reform must push into Congress so that all farmers and the country as a whole can have food security not only today but for coming years. It is a mean to alleviate the country from poverty and hunger.

Reference:

Renmin Vizconde
Executive Director

http://www.pnfsp.org
4269925
pnfsp_inc@yahoo..com.ph

[From the web] Youth showed force in a Millennial Throwback Forum organized by Balay Rehabilitation Center during the national day of protest

Youth showed force in a Millennial Throwback Forum organized by Balay Rehabilitation Center during the national day of protest

[From the web] Youth showed force in a Millennial Throwback Forum organized by Balay Rehabilitation Center during the national day of protest Photo by BaLay Rehabilitation Center

Various youth groups and young individuals from different universities and organizations flocked at the Bantayog ng mga Bayani Auditorium in the morning of September 21 to listen to first-hand experiences of Martial Law survivors during the Martial Rule of Ferdinand Marcos.

Balay Rehabilitation Center in partnership with Human Rights Online Philippines and International Studies Society (ISSOC) of Mirriam College organized a millennial throwback entitled Martial Law Noon…At Ngayon? to commemorate the 45th year of the declaration of Martial Law in 1972.

Those who spoke during the forum were martial law survivors Hilda Narciso and playwright Levy Balgos dela Cruz. Both shared their experiences of suffering and torture under the grim years of the Marcos regime.

Dela Cruz shared that the recent happenings in the country remind him of the martial law years. He also expressed his gratitude that more and more millennials are standing up for the rights that they once fought.

Read full article @balayph.net

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[Statement] Rights group to Davao CSSDO: Hypocrite! -iDEFEND Davao

Press Statement
iDefend-Davao
September 22, 2017

Hypocrite

We deplore the highhanded questioning of the CSSDO on the young participants of yesterday’s picket-rally on the commemoration of imposition of martial law 45 years ago.

We do not doubt the mandate of the office to provide services especially to the children and the youth. Mrs. Maria Luisa T. Bermudo said her only concern was about the teens getting wet in the rain. But her insistence to take them and their guardians to her office for some lecturing in a time of a protest against martial law is sheer arrogance. One cannot be soaked wet in a light drizzle.

The demonstration calls on thwarting the imposition of martial law on the whole nation as well as the ending of extrajudicial killings. The declaration of martial law on 1972 left tens of thousands of victims of illegal arrest, torture, disappearances and summary execution by the military.

The recent enforcement of martial law in Mindanao resulted in a Marawi virtually a no man’s land and close to a half million bakwits. The hundreds of million pesos spent on the shelling of Marawi should have been used up in poverty alleviation.

If the culture of impunity continues and spread to the entire Philippines as in the killing of Kian Loyd de los Santos and Carl Angelo Arnaiz, then the country will soon be sopping in bloodshed. This is more than having our children drenched in rainwater.
If Bermudo is really concerned about the well-being of the children and youth, why didn’t her office raised a howl on the numerous unsolved extrajudicial killings of youngsters? There are many children and young ones roaming in the city begging for alms or asking for food, why not feed them or give free education and offer employment to them so they can become productive citizens?

Our members are responsible enough to educate their children on the issues in any activity they wish to bring them in. These children are not forced to attend demonstrations. The singling out of the youth participants in the rally is ill-advised.

[Press Release] TFDP calls for Filipinos to oppose violent policies of the Government, resist dictatorship! -TFDP

TFDP calls for Filipinos to oppose violent policies of the Government, resist dictatorship!

Photo by Brenda De Guzman

Rights group calls for the Filipino people to oppose President Rodrigo Duterte’s violent policies and resist dictatorship in a press conference in Quezon City on September 19, 2017.

In line with the 45th commemoration of the declaration of Martial Law, Task Force Detainees of the Philippines (TFDP) launches its campaign dubbed as “Mamamayan Ayaw Sa Karahasan (MASK)” (People against violent policies).

“Ang mamamayang Pilipino ay nasa tungki ng ilong ng diktadurya, at ang bayan ay kinukubabawan ng masamang espiritu ng karahasan laban sa karapatang pantao,” said Sr. Crescencia Lucero, SFIC, TFDP Chairperson. (The Filipino people are on the brink of dictatorship, and our nation is possessed by the evil spirit of violence directed against human rights)

“We are deeply concerned that as we remember the Martial Law atrocities in its 45th Anniversary, we now have a President who repeatedly expressed his obsession with declaring Martial Law under his term. We are saddened that we are again under an administration with violent policies and tyrannical ways of leadership,” she added.

TFDP was established in 1974 by the Association of Major Religious Superiors in the Philippines (AMRSP) amidst the blatant violations of human rights during Marcos’ reign.

“Forty-five years after, human rights of the Filipino people are continuously violated. Now the situation is getting worse,” Fr. Christian Buenafe, O.Carm, TFDP Board member lamented.

Fr. Buenafe presented to the media the Deklarasyon ng Mamamayan Ayaw Sa Karahasan, “We, the Filipino people who are against the violent policies of the government will encourage our fellow Filipinos to resist the pervading culture of violence that contradicts our dream for a God fearing, peaceful, civilized and humane society.”

“We appeal to our Government to stop its kill kill kill policies. We appeal to our fellow youth to speak up against violent policies. We appeal to our fellow Filipinos to not allow the reign of terror in our country again. Never Again to Martial Law! Stop kill kill kill policies!” Justinne Jerico Socito, Youth For Rights Chairperson said.

As a symbol of protest, the group wore masks with tears of blood and encouraged the public to join them in the campaign to resist all forms of state violence.###

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[Event] A GAME OF TROLLS

A GAME OF TROLLS

https://web.facebook.com/events/2004275136470312/?acontext=%7B%22ref%22%3A%223%22%2C%22ref_newsfeed_story_type%22%3A%22regular%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22null%22%7D

DAKILA in cooperation with the Philippine Educational Theater Association (PETA) and the Active Vista present A GAME OF TROLLS, a Martial Law Musical for Millennials on September 16, 2017, Saturday, 8:00 pm at the PETA Theater Center, 5 Eymard Drive, New Manila, Quezon City.

A GAME OF TROLLS, #aGoT the Musicale, is the story of Heck, a troll whose indifference makes him the perfect keyboard warrior for Bimbam, the manager of a ‘call center’ that runs an online pro-martial law campaign. His lack of attachment to any belief can be used to make him unleash callous words to anyone who comments against the martial law days. Ghosts of Martial law victims haunt him from the internet cloud, where they fear being erased as people slowly forget their stories. The encounters forced him to reflect on his own beliefs and his relationship with his mother, a former Martial Law activist.

The convergence of these efforts of PETA, DAKILA and Active Vista evokes the power of the creative form in educating millennials on this turbulent time in Philippine history, in encouraging the youth to look beyond memes and online propaganda, in provoking critical discourse on pressing human rights concerns, and in inspiring the Filipino public to courageously resist another dictatorship and fight for human rights and dignity.

VIP DONOR – 2,500

ORCHESTRA CENTER – 1,200

ORCHESTRA SIDE – 1,000

BALCONY – 800

By purchasing tickets to the show, you shall be supporting DAKILA’s efforts in building its Active Vista Learning Center for Human Rights education and MartialLaw.PH, a digital museum of Martial Law in the Philippines. For ticket inquiries, please contact us at activevista@dakila.org.ph or message us at 09178638055. You may also fill out the google form at http://bit.ly/2viPkoG. Deadline of payment is on September 8.

Your support will truly contribute to our humble efforts to reclaim Filipino heroism towards a truly free, democratic and progressive Philippine society.

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[Statement] No To Legalized Impunity Through a Fraudulent Martial Law! -FDC/Palag Na!

No To Legalized Impunity Through a Fraudulent Martial Law!
Justice and Solidarity for the Bangsamoro People and Other Victims of State Repression!

Despite questionable constitutional grounds and fraudulent claims of gory crimes committed by the so-called Maute “terrorist group”, the Supreme Court recently upheld, by an overwhelming majority, President Duterte’s declaration of Martial Law in entire Mindanao.
Proclamation No. 216, which put the whole of Mindanao under martial law and suspended the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus, was signed by the President last May 23 while he was in Russia, thousands of miles away from Marawi City, which was alleged to be one of the key strongholds of Maute and other extremist groups.

Since then, the Filipinos have witnessed heartbreaking sights and sounds of death, pillage and destruction as government troops flushed out their targets through close quarter firefights and aerial bombings of densely populated and civilian sections of Marawi City to implement their Commander In Chief’s brutal command to “kill, kill, kill”.

To date, UN reports say that 350,000 residents, predominantly Bangsamoro civilians, were forcibly displaced, and scattered in evacuation centers and houses of their friends and relatives. The evacuees are homeless, hungry and left to suffer deprivation and indignities as helpless victims of the brutal impacts of martial law. Scores of unarmed and defenseless civilians, including children and the elderly, have reportedly died, while hundreds more suffer more from various ailments, hunger, trauma and mental distress.

According to news reports, over 400 people including soldiers, Maute group members, and civilians have been killed in the Marawi siege. As casualties mount, President Duterte has promised to protect and take care of the orphaned families of his troops. Meanwhile, nothing was mentioned for the hundreds of thousands of displaced and other victimized civilians in terms of compensation and reparation for the loss and damage that they suffered, and without clear prospects for their return to their beloved city to rebuild their battered lives and communities.

The government estimates that at least P10 billion is needed to rebuild Marawi City, with the Asian Development Bank and the World Bank announcing the availability of fresh loans packaged as “assistance”. In truth, these are new debts to further burden us, the people and taxpayers, as we are expected to bear the economic, social and political costs and consequences of the Duterte administration’s Martial Law and war, and the imperatives of rebuilding from the ruins.

We therefore stand in solidarity with the Bangsamoro and other civilian victims of the Marawi siege and those who suffer from the impact of the government’s Martial Law. The Supreme Court decision bodes ill-tidings for our democratic and human rights. This decision not only exonerates the Duterte regime from accountability on its alleged abuses and violations of human rights and the rule of law. The Supreme Court’s landmark stand, legalizes impunity in our land.

Now, nothing can stop this government from declaring Martial Law over the rest of the country by simply claiming the same fraudulent and unconstitutional grounds as was done in Marawi. Nothing can stop this regime from sending its troops to waylay entire cities and its planes to indiscriminately bomb targets, notwithstanding the presence of civilians, and from forcibly displacing millions as their communities are turned into ghost towns. Nothing can stop this regime from forcing us, taxpayers, to bankroll its brutal campaigns of death and destruction, and the huge cost of rebuilding from the ruins of its self-created war.

When wholesale injustice and state repression become the norm and the rule of the day, people’s resistance is not only justified. It is becomes a matter of patriotic duty.

July 5, 2017
Freedom from Debt Coalition
PALAG NA!

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[Statement] Left with a Lone Dissenter, the SC reminds The Filipino People of Marcosian Court -Kalipunan ng mga Kilusang Masa

July 4, 2017
Statement of Kalipunan ng mga Kilusang Masa

Left with a Lone Dissenter, the SC reminds The Filipino People of Marcosian Court

The decision of the Supreme Court to uphold the declaration of Martial Law in Mindanao, as government response to armed conflict that escalated in the city of Marawi, is not the triumph of law, but of authoritarian rule. We are outraged by the Supreme Court’s decision, which could now pave the way for the setting up of authoritarian rule in the whole country.

Worse than the SC division of votes on the critical issue of the dictator’s burial at the Cemetery for Heroes, the SC ruling shows that the third branch of government has become a political pawn. This is not without precedent, as the politicization of what should be independent branches, including the legislature, and institutions, such as the military and police force, was precisely one of the legacies of the 20-year authoritarian Marcos regime.

Before the SC’s decision, we have already witnessed how Congress, both the Senate and the House of Representatives, has disregarded its constitutional duty to call for a session and discuss the legality of the declaration of Martial Law in Mindanao. Owing merely to political loyalties, its members led by the Davao Congressman, Pantaleon Alvarez, sidetracked other legislators’ views by not calling for a session. In his trademark style as bully, Pantaleon even threatened to impeach or ignore the justices if the latter dissented from Congress.

Martial Law in Mindanao is now on its sixth week since the fateful day of Tuesday, May 23, 2017, which would now belong to the darkest days in the history of Mindanao similar to what happened in the time of Marcos. Marawi City, the capital of the province of Lanao del Sur, has been ravaged badly. Moro sisters and brothers tell us that they are reminded of the burning of Jolo in 1974.

As of June 21, at least 230,000 have fled Marawi and 40,000 crowd and make-do evacuation centers, where at least 59 have died of dehydration and diseases. The death toll in the month-long clashes between government forces and the Maute Group has risen to 422, at least 50 of them civilians (according to MindaNews). This would be higher given eyewitnesses’ accounts.

Aerial bombings continue, which claim the lives of more civilians. Local leaders have been calling for the President to dialogue with Meranao leaders for the latter to help in dealing with the Maute Group but without success, as he would rather have war and allow people to suffer He has even blamed the Meranaos for what is happening in Marawi. All these amount to yet another big blow to the decades-long attempts to find lasting peace in the war-torn areas of Mindanao.

The votes of the 14 in the SC cause great dismay in the face of evidences presented by the Integrated Bar of the Philippines in Lanao del Sur of “wanton disregard of sanctity of domicile, the right against deprivation of property without due process of law, the right to be secure in one’s person, house, papers and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures,” especially in Marawi. All of these are in direct violation of the Bill of Rights accorded to all Filipino citizens under Article III of the 1987 Philippine Constitution. The persistence of Martial Law in Mindanao is clearly superfluous to military operations and has trampled on civilian liberties and affected the livelihood of the people.

On its first year, the Duterte regime has already bared its despotic fangs and with this decision of the Supreme Court, the people are being further shoved to the corner without recourse to law, government institutions whose constitutional duty is to protect them, and their duly recognized rights. If this is not authoritarian rule in the making, or plainly authoritarian rule, then clearly we haven’t really learned from our history as a people. We are threatened to having our rights violated, suppressed, and worst, we are threatened to more violence and resulting deaths.

We in Kalipunan ng mga Kilusang Masa, a growing assembly of social movements, call on the people to defend our constitutional rights and to fight the impending authoritarian regime under Duterte. We have members – sisters and brothers – in Marawi and the rest of Mindanao. We cannot allow the continuing loss of life and this government’s choice to resort to violence than to the resolution of the roots of conflict and social problem. As we stand in solidarity and bring continuing support, by material, moral, political means, to our brothers and sisters in Marawi and Mindanao, we stand indignant of the decision of the Supreme Court to uphold the Martial Law declaration in the island.

The situation demands of us who are grassroots-based, to educate and push for a counter-narrative to the authoritarian government’s justification of Martial Law and intensification of armed operations in Mindanao and the country at-large.

Justice, peace and democracy in Mindanao! Stop the Bombings!

Alyansa Tigil Mina (ATM)
Bagong Kamalayan
Baywatch Foundation
Coalition Against Trafficking in Women – Asia Pacific (CATW-AP)
Kilos Maralita (KM)
LILAK (Purple Action for Indigenous Women’s Rights)
Pambansang Kilusan ng mga Samahang Magsasaka (PAKISAMA)
Partido Manggawa (PM)
Sentro ng Progresibo at Nagkakaisang Manggagawa (SENTRO)
Union of Students for the Advancement of Democracy (USAD) – Ateneo
World March of Women (WMW)
Youth and Students Advancing Gender Equality (YSAGE)

Contact Persons:
Dr. Ben Molino, ATM, 09338784860
Wilson Fortaleza, PM, 09158625229
Josua Mata, SENTRO, 09177942431
Billie Blanco, USAD, 09258190496
Jean Enriquez, WMW, 09778105326

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[From the web] Never Again, Never Forget -Forum-Asia

Never Again, Never Forget
19 November 2016

ForumAsia LogoThe Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA) strongly condemns the burial of Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani, the cemetery of national heroes, in the Philippines. The burial of Marcos conveys a distressing message, not only to Filipinos but also to people’s movements all over the region that massive state-perpetrated human rights violations are being honoured. FORUM-ASIA extends its solidarity to all Filipinos who refuse to forget the past human rights violations, the plunder of the nation’s coffers, and the destruction of democratic institutions under the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos.

Ferdinand Marcos was the President of the Philippines from 1965 to 1986. He declared Martial Law and ruled the country with an iron fist from 1972 to 1981. Upon the declaration of Martial Law, all fundamental freedoms were curtailed, the Congress was suspended, and media was completely shut down. The opposition leaders and activists were arrested, detained, tortured, and killed. The grave corruption and neoliberalism economic policy under his rule triggered widespread resistance in urban and rural areas.

In 1986, after the snap election, more than two million Filipinos occupied the street of EDSA for three days from 22-25 February. The People Power Revolution was successful in forcing Marcos to step down and restoring democracy in the Philippines.

The Task Force Detainee of the Philippines (TFDP), one of FORUM-ASIA members in the Philippines, documented 101,538 human rights violation cases perpetrated by Ferdinand Marcos under his dictatorship regime.

“The Philippines was considered as one of the most democratic countries in the region since Filipino people ousted Ferdinand Marcos by non-violent resistance in 1986. We are deeply disappointed by the Supreme Court’s decision and Rodrigo Duterte’s administration to honour the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos,” says John Samuel, Executive Director of FORUM-ASIA.

Read full article @www.forum-asia.org

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[Statement] Remember the Assault on Women during Martial Law Resist a Return to Tyranny -KAISA KA

Remember the Assault on Women during Martial Law Resist a Return to Tyranny

Kaisa kaThe Marcos fascist regime, which meant 14 years of terror to the Filipino people, inflicted some of the most inhuman state-sponsored violence against women (VAW) on the biggest number of Filipinas since WWII.  This should be one big reason for women and for men who honor their wives, mothers, sisters, aunts and grandmothers to oppose historical revisions about that era and resist a return to autocratic rule.

As we join the global 16 Days of Activism against VAW on its 25th year, KAISA KA, a women’s organization in the struggle for women’s emancipation and social change, deems it fit and timely to focus on state-sponsored violence against women.

Heinous forms of VAW

Most of the victims of violence during the dictatorship are in their senior years now and many have died.  Many women had passed away without fully disclosing their stories about gang-rape, rape using foreign objects like pistols, sexual battering and other harrowing experiences in the hands of soldiers, to whom the Marcos dictatorship has practically given license and privileges.  Most of these victims, though, have told their husbands, their best friends, their confidantes.

Victims of state-sponsored VAW during those dark years included not only women who were arrested and detained for being suspects of subversion but also young daughters of farmers that soldiers met in the barrios (rural barangays), women working in bars that soldiers frequented, even a few actresses that certain units of the military intelligence were attracted to and thus were declared as “suspected subversive elements.”

Soldiers subjected women visiting detained relatives to unnecessary frisking, oftentimes, while throwing obscenities or groping their private parts.  Some would peek at couples in conjugal enclosures.  Pregnant women were not spared.  And some interrogators threatened to rape girl-children of detainees being investigated if they do not “cooperate.”

In the rural areas, countless mothers suffered the anguish of seeing their children go hungry or not being able to feed them on time as soldiers would prevent the movement of supplies they bought from the town markets or would destroy their crops, accusing them of providing food stuff for rebels.

The list of the various forms of violence could be very long.  But most heart rending were the several cases of abduction of innocent children of suspected rebels.  Military detachments displayed these children for a while, a psychological ploy, ostensibly to prevent rebels from conducting attacks and to lure the parents to surrender.

A Reason for Alarm

It is alarming that for several months now, while President Duterte has drummed up total agreement and support for his war against drugs, creating a culture of fear and silence (to question and criticize), some people, especially in the social media were also actively spreading the so-called positive outcomes of martial law and extolling the “appropriateness” of a “strongman rule” for the Philippines. Even as he interspaced his comments with character

While he sounded during the presidential campaign like he was merely warning drug lords, dealers, pushers and users so that they could change, it has become clear that he was true to his byword: kill, kill, kill.   A day after his inaugural, the Duterte did not mince words when at San Beda College, he said, “Ang due process ay sa korte.  Hindi ninyo mahahanap yan sa akin.” (Due process is in the courts.  You cannot find it in me). In different occasions, he said, he does not care for human rights.

Alleged drug lords, dealers, pushers and users killed is now around 5,000.  Duterte however, bids for a longer time for his “war against drugs” because as he has his own list of suspects, he realized that more “nonhumans” have to be killed.  He is asking Congress to bring back death penalty and to lower the age of minors who could be charged criminally from the present 17 years old to 12-9 years old.  Not content with the present security forces, he has voiced his intent to build a gendarme, “something like the former Philippine Constabulary.”

All his critics from heads of States (US and the Vatican) to neophyte Senator Leila de Lima received a verbal thrashing adding character defamation and shaming for the Lady Senator and now echoed by his allies in a “super-majority Congress”.

He even threatened the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court about declaring martial law after she instructed judges in Duterte’s list of “drug personalities” to not surrender.  He apologized a few days afterwards but lately, he warned that if lawlessness escalates he would be forced to suspend the writ of habeas corpus.

As the killings are continuously desensitizing people, Duterte ushers in Ferdinand Marcos, Jr’s return and rise to power by introducing him in China as “the next vice president, if he wins his case against Vice President Leni Robredo” and by finally allowing the burial of the dictator Marcos in the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LNMB).

Clearly now, Duterte is heading towards a kind of rule that approximates martial law.

More reason for women to oppose tyranny

Open fascist rule in itself spells danger for women.  When even “rules of discipline” of the state security forces can be set aside in the name of “securing the state”, women become open prey of powerful sections that are licensed to kill.
.
A culture of rape-as-punishment being promoted now is ominous of how bad a Duterte fascist rule will be for women. Threatening to rape (and kill) women who question or criticize the president’s ideas and actions has not been as widely used as now and by the very persons promoting through the social media a pro-martial law/pro- strongman-rule culture and adulation of Duterte.  And the president, who never apologized for his ill remark on the rape of an Australian despite strong criticisms from here and from other parts of the world, has never issued a public censure to stop this culture of violence against women.  Instead, his speeches continue to mirror his own disrespect and low regard for women.

Misogynist Duterte could make a fascist rule doubly menacing for women. We should resist it now.

Oppose the return of tyranny!
No to all forms of violence against women!
Resist state violence against women!
——
KAISA KA
Pagkakaisa ng Kababaihan para sa Kalayaan
#22-A Libertad Street, Highway Hills, Mandaluyong City 1501, Philippines
Telefax: (02) 7173262                               Email: kaisa_ka98@yahoo.com
Website: http://www.kaisaka.org / http://www.kaisakakalayaan.org

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[Statement] We hold the Duterte administration responsible for this latest insult to the victims of martial law -TFDP

TFDP logo smallTask Force Detainees of the Philippines is outraged by this sneaky burial of a plunderer, dictator and human rights violator.

We hold the Duterte administration responsible for this latest insult to the victims of martial law and to the valiant struggle of our people to bring down the conjugal dictatorship.

The Marcoses and their ilk want to revise history in their bid to regain Malacanang. Their plundered wealth is being used to coopt or buy out those who will stand in their way.

In life Ferdinand Marcos was a thief. Even in death he remained a thief – robbing our people of all decency, defying our courts and the rule of law.

To those who conspired and continue to connive to erase the memory of those dark times we say: Guard it well. There will be no rest. There will be no closure. There will be no moving on until justice is done.

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[Statement] Like a thief in the night, the dictator’s corpse is snuck into the Libingan ng mga Bayani in lightning fashion -iDEFEND

1 copyLike a thief in the night, the dictator’s corpse is snuck into the Libingan ng mga Bayani in lightning fashion, to avoid the protests that would surely accompany it to the grave. Until the end the Marcos family displays their characteristic treachery on the Filipino people with no regard for the victims of Martial Law. This is the family that President Duterte wishes to revise history with, and it is Marcos’ martial law that Duterte wishes to reintroduce in the country. In their desperate efforts to forget the widespread atrocities during the brutal rule of Marcos, Duterte and the Marcos family also forget the courage of our people in fighting for justice and freedom, a fight they gave their lives for, a fight that we will continue. Thus the real heroes are in the people’s hearts and minds, they are in the true Himlayan ng mga Bayani. Marcos is no hero. We have our whole lives to imprint that into the next generation, and the next and the next.

[Press Release] Dakila Launches The Digital Museum of Martial Law in the Philippines www.MartialLaw.ph

Dakila Launches The Digital Museum of Martial Law in the Philippines
http://www.MartialLaw.ph

Dakila newOn September 21, 2016, 44 years after the signing of Proclamation No. 1081 that put the Philippines under Martial Law, Dakila, a group of artists working on human rights, launched the Digital Museum of Martial Law in the Philippines.

The Digital Museum of Martial Law in the Philippines is an immersive, critical, and creative platform for historical and cultural education. The museum is a virtual space serving as a living memorial to the Martial Law Era, accessible to Filipinos all over the world.

“It is crucial that Filipinos do not lose sight of this pivotal part of our history,”  says Micheline Rama, Museum Co-Director and Dakila’s Campaigns Director.

Dakila intends for the Museum to become a venue to provoke critical reflection, inclusive learning, and vigilant remembrance through the multi-faceted lens of artistic expression.

“We are aiming for the right balance between Internet memes and long chapters in textbooks,” Rama explains. “We cannot rely on only snippets of information that don’t have any context but we cannot also expect people to read through pages and pages of text. This is where art, creativity, and technology come in.”

Her Museum Co-Director agrees.  “You can explore the exhibits on the site as if it were an actual museum,” states Andrei Venal, who also serves as Dakila’s Creative Director, “Each exhibit is a curated journey using different multimedia elements to make history come alive.”

The Museum’s current exhibits includes “Isang Daan” (“One Hundred/One Road”), “an interactive timeline of 100 moments, mementos, and memories one the paths leading to Martial Law and the People Power Revolution” which features not only news clips, and personal accounts, but also economic data, public works, and even popular songs of the era.

The Museum is also host to as a special limited-time screening of Hector Baretto Calma’s award-winning short film, “Ang Mga Alingawngaw Sa Panahon Ng Pagpapasya” (“Echoes In the Midst of Indecision”) starring Alessandra de Rossi as the matriarch of a family torn apart by the social and political upheavals during the Martial Law Era.

The Museum has already lined up several upcoming exhibits. “ML: TL;DR”, curated by Michael Charleston “Xiao” Chua, is a multimedia primer on Martial Law, and “Sounds of Martial Law” curated by Ralph Eya.

Venal hopes that “whether you are a creative professional, writer, historian, academics or even just a passionate individual, you can submit to us your ideas for digital exhibitions on the topic of Martial Law, People Power, and Revolution. Schools, government bodies and other organizations are also very much welcome.”

Potential partners and collaborators may contact Dakila at at proposals@dakila.org.ph and submit their proposal with “DMMLPh Proposal” as the email subject line.

The Digital Museum of Martial Law in the Philippines is open to the public at http://www.MartialLaw.ph

DAKILA is a group of artists, students, and individuals committed to working together to creatively spark social consciousness formation towards social change.

Learn more at http://dakila.org.ph

Press Contact
Micheline Rama
dakila.media@gmail.com / katipon@dakila.org.ph
+63 915 178 0240

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[Statement] End the Killings. Uphold Human Rights. Defend Democracy -iDEFEND

photo-by-celia-lagman

Photo by Celia Lagman/FIND

End the Killings. Uphold Human Rights. Defend Democracy

1 copyToday is the International Day of Peace.

Development and peace go together, and this is why the United Nations sees as central to the achievement of sustainable development the drastic reduction of all forms of violence, the promotion of the rule of law, and equal access to justice for all.

This day is especially significant for our country since for the last three months, the country has been wracked by seeming government-sponsored violence and lawlessness, by a war the administration has declared, ostensibly against drugs but which has become a war against poor and marginalized Filipinos. Since the election of President Rodrigo Duterte, over 3000 people, practically all of them alleged drug users from the poor sector of Philippine society, have been subjected to extra-judicial execution either by the police or by vigilante groups.  While President Duterte’s subordinates invent ever more complex arguments to exonerate him, he  has made little attempt to conceal his preference for the extra-judicial execution of suspected drug dealers and users and his impatience with due process.  He has also enthusiastically given the green light to vigilantes to shoot pushers and users. And he has made it very clear that he does not believe in rehabilitation, which is the principal policy of all other governments towards users.

Not surprisingly, the president’s approach to the drug problem has earned him widespread notoriety internationally, to which he has responded by cursing his critics, including world leaders, and threatening to take the Philippines out of the United Nations.

While the police and vigilante groups go on a killing spree, his rabid followers intimidate those who stand for human rights and due process, branding them as protectors of drug lords.

Adding to the spreading sense of threat to basic rights among the citizenry is the president’s determination to bury the remains of dictator Ferdinand Marcos in the Libingan ng mga Bayani.  By enshrining the dead dictator as a hero, this move would legitimize his 14-year reign of terror, from 1972 to 1986, with its countless violations of human rights, political rights, and economic and social rights. It would constitute an airbrushing of history.

Democracy is under threat today.

Photo by PhilRights

Photo by PhilRights

In Sept. 4, the President has put the whole country under a State of Emergency due to lawless violence, indefinitely. Recently, we witnessed the most vivid manifestation of the failure of democracy being the Malacanang-directed ouster of Senator de Lima as head of the Justice Committee.  This is the latest move of  the Executive  to gain total control of Congress.  As for the president’s stance toward the Supreme Court, the whole country witnessed how he angrily threatened to declare martial law when the Court asserted its authority in the investigation of judges that Malacanang had linked to drugs.

Forty four years ago today, Marcos declared martial law.  Today, we face a similar  if not a greater threat to our lives, liberties, and democratic rights .  These rights, for which so many of our people fought and died for, are enshrined in our constitution.  We cannot allow anyone to take those rights away from us.

Thus, on this International Day of Peace, we demand that the Duterte administration put an end to extra-judicial killings. We demand that this administration:

·       respect human rights and due process,
·       refrain from subverting the separation of powers,
·       uphold democratic processes instead of curtailing them.

But above all, we call on our fellow citizens to join us in defense of our rights, our liberties, our democracy.  For as the old saying goes, “The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is that good women and men should stand by and do nothing.”

(Statement of iDefend Coalition, Sept. 21, 2016)

https://web.facebook.com/notes/i-defend-human-rights-and-dignity-movement/end-the-killings-uphold-human-rights-defend-democracy/1743241059259130

[From the web] Duterte and the ghosts of Plaza Miranda By James Ross/HRW

COMMENTARY: Duterte and the ghosts of Plaza Miranda
By: James Ross
@inquirerdotnet
Philippine Daily Inquirer
September 8, 2016

200px-Hrw_logo.svgForty-five years ago, on Aug. 21, 1971, three grenades were tossed at the speaker’s podium in Manila’s Plaza Miranda, where thousands had gathered for an opposition rally. Nine people were killed and at least 100 wounded in an act of political violence that shocked the Philippines.

Opposition politicians blamed the increasingly authoritarian president, Ferdinand Marcos, for the deadly attack; Marcos blamed the insurgent Communist Party of the Philippines. A year later, Marcos declared martial law and suspended the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus, putting the country on a path to dictatorship, with arbitrary arrests, torture and killings that did not let up until the “People Power” revolution of 1986 forced Marcos out of office.

Last week, on Sept. 2, unidentified assailants bombed a popular night market in Davao City while President Duterte, the city’s former mayor, was in town. The horrific attack killed at least 14 people and wounded more than 60. The Islamist armed group Abu Sayyaf claimed responsibility. The next day, the President said it was his duty to protect the country and declared a “state of lawlessness.” (It has since been formally proclaimed as “a state of national emergency on account of lawless violence.-ED.) He made clear that: “It’s not martial law, but I am inviting now the … military and the police to run the country according to my specifications. … They can do what they really need to do until such time that I can say it is safe.”

Although Mr. Duterte’s reputation rests as much on his outrageous public utterances as on the things he has done, his words after the bombing were carefully chosen. The Philippine Constitution of 1987 places significant legislative and judicial checks on a president’s ability to declare martial law, a deliberate attempt to avoid a repetition of the Marcos tyranny. However, the same constitutional provision provides no explicit checks on the president as commander in chief to call on the Armed Forces of the Philippines “to prevent or suppress lawless violence, invasion or rebellion.”

Even under a president who respected human rights, calling on the military to carry out law enforcement duties would be troubling.  Soldiers are trained and equipped to kill enemy fighters on the battlefield—military police aside, they are not a suitable force for carrying out law enforcement operations against civilians in a rights-respecting manner.

But this is a president who, in his short time in office, has shown not an iota of concern for human rights.  His “war on drugs” has been a bloodbath. Unidentified gunmen have killed more than 1,000 people between July 1, when Mr. Duterte took office, and mid-August. Official statistics show that in the same period, police have killed 712 suspected “drug pushers and users.” Administration assertions that these deaths were not “salvagings”—police slang for extrajudicial killings—but lawful acts of self-defense, ring hollow.

Mr. Duterte’s declaration of a state of lawlessness appears less intended to bolster an overwhelmed police force or deploy the military in counterinsurgency operations—that’s been their role for decades—but rather to justify and expand the bloody path down which he has already taken the country. “There is a crisis in this country involving drugs, extrajudicial killings, and there seems to be an environment of lawlessness, lawless violence,” he said in his Sept. 3 statement. The military needed a bigger role because “these are extraordinary times.”

The immediate danger is that the Philippine military will be added to the combustible mix of trigger-happy police and vigilantes who, with Mr. Duterte’s encouragement, have gunned down men, women and children on the streets, inside their homes, and in detention centers after arrest. Recent progress in curtailing such abuses by the military, which had committed summary executions with impunity since Marcos’ time, will likely fall by the wayside.

The long-term danger may be even greater.  Unless Philippine lawmakers demonstrate political will, the Davao City bombing could become Mr. Duterte’s Plaza Miranda, an atrocity of convenience to justify presidential usurpation of power. The decades since the fall of Marcos have often been difficult, but through good administrations and bad, Filipinos have held tight to the fundamental belief that respect for basic liberties and democratic institutions, however flawed in practice, were at the heart of Filipino values. Invoking people power might not be successful a second time around.

James Ross, the legal and policy director at Human Rights Watch, lived in the Philippines in the mid-1980s.

Read more: http://opinion.inquirer.net/97155/duterte-ghosts-plaza-miranda#ixzz4JcFuXpjW

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[Video] Our History: The Marcos Legacy. ISINUKA NA, ISUSUBO PA ULI by Martial Law Chronicles

Our History: The Marcos Legacy. ISINUKA NA, ISUSUBO PA ULI by Martial Law Chronicles

ISINUKA NA VIDEO

https://www.facebook.com/MartialLawChronicles/videos

 

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[Featured Site] The Martial Law Chronicles Project

The Martial Law Chronicles Project
ML Chronicles copyThe Martial Law Chronicles is a joint project by the Freedom for Media Alternatives (FMA) and the Martial Law Chronicles Team; and endorsed by the Commission on Human Rights (CHR).

WE ARE SEEING A LOT OF SYSTEMATIC HISTORICAL REVISIONISM (NEGATIONISM) IN SOCIAL MEDIA, IT IS TIME THAT WE ADDRESS THIS PROPERLY SO AS TO GIVE JUSTICE TO OUR PAST.

WHAT IS HISTORICAL REVISIONISM (NEGATIONISM)… AND WHY WE NEED TO ADDRESS THIS PLEASE SEE BELOW:

Historical revisionism involves either the legitimate scholastic re-examination of existing knowledge about a historical event, or the illegitimate distortion of the historical record. For the former, i.e. the academic pursuit, see historical revisionism.

This article deals solely with the latter, the distortion of history, which—if it constitutes the denial of historical crimes—is also sometimes called negationism.

In attempting to revise the past, illegitimate historical revisionism may use techniques inadmissible in proper historical discourse, such as presenting known forged documents as genuine; inventing ingenious but implausible reasons for distrusting genuine documents; attributing conclusions to books and sources that report the opposite; manipulating statistical series to support the given point of view; and deliberately mis-translating texts (in languages other than the revisionist’s).

Some countries, such as Germany, have criminalised the negationist revision of certain historical events, while others take a more cautious position for various reasons, such as protection of free speech; still others mandate negationist views.

Notable examples of negationism include Holocaust denial, Armenian Genocide denial, Japanese war crime denial, and Soviet historiography.- From Wikipedia

“He who does not know how to look back at where he came from will never get to his destination.” – Jose Rizal

E:  martial.law.chronicles@gmail.com
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[Press Release] Unique obstacle run to relive Martial Law period -UP SAMASA Alumni Association

Unique obstacle run to relive Martial Law period

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Have you ever wondered what it was like to live in that dark period of our nation’s history when the free press was shut down, the voice of the people was suppressed, and thousands of Filipinos were abducted, tortured and summarily executed?

The University of the Philippines is again living up to its reputation as the bastion of youth social consciousness, this time through an obstacle run that will give runners a taste of what it was like during the years of Martial Law.

Dubbed The Great LEAN Run (TGLR), the activity will feature obstacles reminiscent of dictatorial rule, such as barbed wire, water cannons, anti-riot police, arbitrary arrests and much more. Runners will aim to survive the challenges of the course for a chance to win prizes, not to mention unique bragging rights.

TGLR honours the life of Lean Alejandro, student leader of the 1980s who led the student movement that helped a national people’s action to depose then President Ferdinand Marcos.

Atty. Susan Villanueva, Chairman of the UP SAMASA Alumni Association, said, “The overthrow of the dictator and our subsequent return to democracy is a major victory of the Filipino people. The youth of today should be made aware of the real situation at the time so that they can learn from it and be guided by its lessons as they become the new leaders of the nation.”

Proceeds of the obstacle run will go to the UP fund for the Liwasang Lean Alejandro.

The Great LEAN Run will be held on September 19, Saturday, 5:00pm at the UP Sunken garden and Academic Oval in Diliman. Registration is ongoing online at the Great LEAN Run Facebook page and Chris Sports branches at SM Megamall, SM City North, Glorietta 3 and Metro Marjket Market BGC. For details, interested participants may contact Irish Vayne Alacar at 0906270646 and vayne.alacar@withoulimits.ph.

Reference:Atty. Susan Villanueva 09178450376 and/or sd.villanueva@gmail.com
https://www.facebook.com/TheGreatLEANRun/timeline

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[Press Release] PNoy approves six-month extension of deadline for Martial Law claims application -Akbayan

PNoy approves six-month extension of deadline for Martial Law claims application

Three months after the November 10, 2014 deadline expiration, President Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III has approved Joint Resolution No. 3 extending for six months the deadline for Martial Law claims application to May 2015.

akbayan_logo

Joint Resolution No. 3 is the consolidation of Senate Joint Resolution No. 10 and House Joint Resolution No. 16.

“The enactment of the law is a crucial victory for the families and victims of human rights violations during the Martial Law period whose hope and opportunity to file their claims for reparation and redress for the sacrifices and sufferings they endured in the past were blighted by the November 2014 deadline,” Akbayan Rep. Barry Gutierrez.

“With the new deadline, we ensure that all legitimate claimants, particularly those who are now in their final years and those who are living in the far-flung areas, are given the vital time and full opportunity to file their claims with the Human Rights Victims’ Claims Board,” the lawmaker added.

Gutierrez said that an estimated 25,000 to 50,000 legitimate claimants are yet to file their claims for reparation under Republic Act No. 10368, or the Human Rights Victims Reparation and Recognition Act of 2013.

“Even as a new deadline is set, we, however, continue to urge the various grassroots-based civil society organizations located across the country to support the Board in reaching out to all the victims, many of whom have no access to public information on Martial Law claims and the Claims board,” the Akbayan solon said.

“Through our collective efforts, we could help usher in the much-needed redress to the victims and provide a proper recognition of their heroism and sacrifices in defense of individual rights and liberties and the nation’s democracy while laying down the necessary steps toward national healing and renewal,” he concluded.

February 25, 2015
PRESS RELEASE
For Immediate Release
Contact Person: Rose Humiwat @ 0905 132 5474

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