Tag Archives: Malabon

[Press Release] Labor enforcement reforms needed in wake of Paranaque construction accident -PM

Labor enforcement reforms needed in wake of Paranaque construction accident

The militant labor group Partido ng Manggagawa (PM) called for stronger labor enforcement and labor inspection reforms in response to the accident at a construction site in Paranaque last Wednesday that claimed the life of one worker and injured 15. “Heads must roll and justice must be served for the needless deaths and injuries to construction workers,” insisted Wilson Fortaleza, PM spoksperson, as he predicted that more accidents are due to happen with the current real estate boom.

pmLogo1

PM lambasted employers for cutting corners in occupational safety in order to raise profits and the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) for the lax implementation of labor and safety standards. “While capitalists were scrimping on protection for workers and DOLE was sleeping on its job of enforcement, workers are dying in the workplace,” Fortaleza elaborated.

Ricardo “Boy” Marcaida, a construction worker who is acting president of the Samahan ng Manggagawa sa Komunidad (SMK) in Malabon, averred that “Accidents are not acts of divine providence that can be dismissed as unavoidable. Instead accidents are the result of unsafe acts and therefore preventable by strict enforcement of occupational safety and health and labor standards.” SMK is a legitimate labor organization registered with the DOLE which is affiliated to PM.

“Under the regime of the DOLE’s self-assessment program, the number of labor inspectors have shrunk from around 240 to less than 200 and the number of establishments inspected plummeted from 60,000 in 2003 to just 6,000 in 2010. Self-assessment means that the government is asking the wolf to guard the sheep. No wonder the sheep get slaughtered,” Marcaida criticized.

He recommended that “We propose that the DOLE deputize labor leaders as labor inspectors. In so doing the number of inspectors and inspections can be increase several fold overnight, enforcement can be strengthened immediately, and workers lives and limbs can be saved.”

Fortaleza added that “The DOLE has again been caught sleeping on the job. DOLE must review contractors and their principals for compliance not just with safety regulations but labor standards such as payment of minimum wages and benefits, observance of working hours and remittance of social security among others. Construction workers are among the most overworked yet underpaid of employees since they are generally unorganized.”

Press Release
October 5, 2013
Contact Wilson Fortaleza @ 09178233956
Partido ng Manggagawa Spokesperson

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[Press Release] Teachers, families join picnic on the last day of vacation -TDC

 

Teachers, families join picnic on the last day of vacation

logo TDC

 

As a final farewell to vacation, some 50 teachers from Metro Manila, Cavite and Bulacan gather today in Luneta Park, Manila for a family day picnic organized by the Teachers’ Dignity Coalition (TDC). Teachers are expected to come with their families and bring their own food and picnic mats.

The activity aims to highlight the sacrifices of the Filipino teachers, who, despite low salaries and heavy workloads amidst the continuing shortages in public school resources and low education budget, selflessly offer themselves for the benefit of the Filipino children and the nation as a whole.

Thus, the teachers call on the government to prioritize their welfare especially their salaries so they would not need to seek for other sources of income and could focus on their school tasks and give more time for their families.

Benjo Basas, the group’s national chairperson said that while teachers find the government’s treatment on the sector wanting, they are still willing to commit themselves for to teach the Filipino children.

“It is because of these shortages and the low salaries of teachers that push us to take odd jobs on the side just to make ends meet, sometimes giving-up our quality time to prepare lessons and even the quality time for our very own families.” Basas explained.

Teachers ask President Aquino to increase education budget in order to hire more teachers, build more classrooms and purchase education materials for public schools. For their salary, teachers ask for a P9000.00 across the board increase for state education workers, which is a pending bill in both houses of Congress.

Lastly, they are also asking the Department of Education (DepEd) for the immediate release of the performance-based bonus (PBB) which supposedly due on the first quarter of this year. #

Reference:
Benjo Basas, TDC National Chairperson, 0920-5740241

Cases for interviews:
1. Marcelina Dumaging, a teacher of Potrero ES in Malabon City. A mother of 3, two are in college and the youngest is an incoming grade 8. Her husband is a driver. Ma’am Cely is a grade level leader, works 6 hours in classroom and tasked to perform other duties. She also accepts tutorials and offers Boardwalk and Avon products. (0939-3940141)

2. Emelenado Arevalo, a Mathematics master teacher of Bagong Barrio NHS in Calocan City. He has 3, two sons are in college while the youngest child is in grade 6. His wife is a field researcher who often comes home late. Sir Meng is currently taking his PhD for better opportunities. He is having a tutorial job for additional income. He is tasked to do household chores after school and tutorial works. (0928-2006828)

NEWS RELEASE
June 2, 2013

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sign petiton2 smallPhoto by TFDPcat alert icon copy

[Event] Teachers’ Family Day Picnic -TDC

Teachers’ Dignity Coalition
“Unity of Teachers to Regain the Dignity of Teaching Profession”
SEC Registration Number: CN 2007-10645
117-C Matatag St., Bgy. Central, Quezon City
Hotline: (02)3853437 • Telefax (02)4350036 • Mobile: 0920-5740241/ 0920-4142614
Email: teachersdignity@yahoo.com.ph • Website: http://www.teachersdignity.com/

ADVISORY
June 1, 2013

Activity: Teachers’ Family Day Picnic
Date: June 2, 2013, Sunday, 8:30AM at Lapu-lapu Monument area, Luneta Park, Manila

logo TDC
Details:

  • Some 60 families of teachers from Metro Manila, Cavite and Bulacan will join the Family Day Picnic at Luneta Park organized by the Teachers’ Dignity Coalition (TDC). Teachers are expected to come with their families and bring their own food and picnic mats.
  • The activity aims to highlight the sacrifices of the Filipino teachers, who, despite low salaries and heavy workloads amidst the continuing shortages in public school resources and low education budget, selflessly offers themselves for the benefit of the Filipino children and the nation as a whole
  • Thus, the teachers call on the government to prioritize their welfare especially their salaries so they would not need to seek for other sources of income and could focus on their school tasks and could give more time for their families
  • Teachers ask President Aquino to increase education budget in order to hire more teachers, build more classrooms and purchase education materials for public schools. For their salary, teachers ask for a P9000.00 across the board increase for state education workers, which is a pending bill in both houses of Congress.
  • Lastly, they are also asking the Department of Education (DepEd) for the immediate release of the performance-based bonus (PBB) which supposedly due on the first quarter of this year

Reference:
Benjo Basas, TDC National Chairperson, 0920-5740241

Cases for interviews:
1. Marcelina Dumaging, a teacher of Potrero ES in Malabon City. A mother of 3, two are in college and the youngest is in an incoming grade 8. Her husband is a jeepney driver. Ma’am Cely is a grade level leader, works 6 hours in classroom and tasked to perform other duties. She also accepts tutorials and offers Boardwalk and Avon products.
(0939-3940141)

2. Emelenado Arevalo, a Mathematics master teacher of Bagong Barrio NHS in Calocan City. He has 3, two sons are in college while the youngest child is in grade 6. His wife is a field researcher who often comes home late. Sir Meng is currently taking his PhD for better opportunities. He is having a tutorial job for additional income. He is tasked to do household chores after school and tutorial works.
(0928-2006828)

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

sign petiton2 smallPhoto by TFDP

[Press Release] Many teachers not yet paid for election duty -TDC

Many teachers not yet paid for election duty

TDC

Ten days after the elections, teachers and other personnel who served as members of the Board of election inspectors (BEI) and support staff in the polling precincts have yet to receive their honorarium. The Teachers’ Dignity Coalition (TDC) monitoring revealed that as of Wednesday, May 22 teachers from many areas are still waiting for their honorarium despite the assurance from the Comelec that the payment shall be released immediately to the concerned personnel.

“Two days after the elections, there were reports that Malabon and Valenzuela teachers have received their honorarium which was announced by the Comelec on May 14.” Said Emmalyn Policarpio, the group’s secretary-general.

Policarpio appreciates the Comelec action which according to her was agreed by the poll body and her group in a dialogue in September last year. “The early release of honorarium in some cities is a proof that the Comelec live out to its commitment.” Policarpio added.

However, more than a week after the elections, the TDC has been receiving complaints from teachers about the delay.

“The Comelec office in Intramuros may have nothing to do with the delay, but they have to look into the matter. The declaration from the Comelec Chair himself that they have released the payment for all those who served in the elections contradicts the real scenario in the field.” Policarpio explained.

During their September dialogue, Comelec Chair Sixto Brillantes was quoted “I really can’t understand why the payment is always delayed.”

Based on the TDC monitoring as of May 22, there are still 42 localities where teachers reported that they have not been paid of their election duties as BEI, while there is no report yet regarding the payment of support staff, even from those localities where BEIs were already paid.

Members of the BEI shall received a total of P4000.00 for their duty while the support staff, those are tasked to assist the BEI in 3 or more clustered precincts shall be paid P1500 for their service.

“While we have no problem in the speed of counting, transmission and canvassing of votes, we still suffer the delay in the payment for the teachers.” Policarpio ended. #

For details: Emmalyn Policarpio, TDC Secretary-General, 0939-7798649
Monitoring sheet attached

NEWS RELEASE
23 May 2013

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[In the news] Malabon provides free weighing-in, nutritional supplements to 46,224 infants -Balita.ph

Malabon provides free weighing-in, nutritional supplements to 46,224 infants

February 21, 2012

MANILA, Feb. 21 – In line with its efforts to provide adequate healthcare to indigent families, especially those nursing infants, the Malabon local government announced that it has provided free weighing-in and nutritional supplements to 46, 224 babies with age ranges of 0 to 59 months beginning 2007 to 2011.

Malabon Mayor Canuto “Tito” Oreta said that the program was administered by the City Health Office through its 21 barangay centers.

He added infants found lacking in weight were immediately provided with the necessary food supplements and vitamins to make them healthier.

Aside from this, medical staff on the above-mentioned centers also provided nutritional and nursing tips to mothers and other members of the infants’ families.

Read full article @ balita.ph

Fire them – INQUIRER.net, Philippine News for Filipinos

(Sharing Conrado de Quiros’ Column Theres The Rub, today he talks about the murder of Marlina Flores-Sumera- HRonlinePH)

Fire them – INQUIRER.net, Philippine News for Filipinos.

Theres The Rub
By Conrado de Quiros
Philippine Daily Inquirer
Source: inquirer.net Posted 22:02:00 03/28/2011
Filed Under: Media killings, Crime and Law and Justice, Police

 

Conrado De Quiros' PDI Column Banner source: http://sacredmusings.wordpress.com

AFTER I first read about the details of Marlina Flores-Sumera’s murder last Friday, I too thought that it might have to do with something other than her work as an announcer for a radio station in Malabon. Her colleagues said she wasn’t handling a particularly incendiary program, one that called for taking on the corrupt and ungodly who are to be found in high places employing low life. And she wasn’t confrontational.

As it appears, Sumera might have been murdered for her work not as a journalist but as an organizer. Sumera was one of the leading figures of a group calling for the distribution of a 4.2-hectare lot in Maysilo, Malabon, claiming it is government property. A rival group opposes that, saying the land is owned privately. Shortly before she was shot, the courts had just ruled in favor of Sumera’s group.

Sumera might have been murdered for reasons other than that she was a journalist. It doesn’t matter. Solving her murder remains the government’s No. 1 priority.

At the very least that is so because Sumera was a crusader, journalist or not. She was doing something for the little people of which she was one herself. Though she wasn’t rich or powerful, and though she probably understood the risks of pissing off those who were, she still did what she did, out of conviction, out of solidarity with her neighbors, out of a desire to give her own children a better life. That is what journalists do, or are supposed to, whether “in uniform” or out of it.

Quite apart from that, Sumera was ordinary folk. She was not a candidate or a BIR/Customs official or a pawnshop owner/loan shark who was gunned down while her car was pulling away from her garage or while it stewed before a red light. Sumera was a working woman, a member of the bedraggled class that hauls its ass off every early morning to go to the workplace to bring food to the table. She was killed while she was walking to the jeepney stop to take her daily commute. The assailant crept up behind her and shot her in the head, as cold-blooded a hit as you can find.

Sumera left behind a girl and two boys, aged 13, 11 and 6. If you are a parent, that’s the one thing that will get to you. Because you know what it is to worry about yourself not because of yourself but because of the children you will deprive of yourself if something happens to you. You can believe that Sumera’s last thoughts, such as there was an instant of time that afforded it, were about her children.

Sumera was ordinary folk. That’s what makes her case extraordinarily urgent. It makes the loudest claim to justice of all.

At the very most, whether the motive for killing Sumera had to do with her being a journalist or not, she was still a journalist and her murder carries a message for journalists. Or it has the most humongous consequences for journalists.

Her murder adds to the culture of impunity surrounding the killings of journalists. Her murder emboldens others to think of that option when dealing with journalists. It’s the fourth case of a journalist being killed in this country since President Benigno Aquino III took over, which suggests that the culture of impunity hasn’t been curbed at all. Or those steeped in it are not loath to test the new waters. Malabon comes pretty close to the capital. What’s to prevent the corrupt and ungodly from taking the killings a step further, finding someone better known and making the killing look as though it had nothing to do with journalism, or was payback time only for a “dirty journalist” (like a “dirty cop”) which can’t be hard with the AC-DC tribe?

As it is, the murder of Gerry Ortega hasn’t been solved and continues to drag on. Ortega was a journalist as well quite apart from being an environmentalist, taking on Palawan’s corrupt and ungodly, particularly where their greed was despoiling God’s earth. His murder sends this message to journalists, quite apart from environmentalists: “No matter how high up you go, no matter who your protectors are, we will get you. You cross us, you will pay.” That is the very message government in fact should be sending murderers. “No matter how rich and powerful you are, no matter who is protecting you, we will drag you out. You break the law, you will pay.”

You can’t send that message to criminals if you can’t catch them.

There is one surefire way to do so. That is by firing the entire police officialdom of the district where the murder occurs if they are not able to solve it in record time. Will that deplete the ranks of the police? Sure, and the better for it. Or the better for the country. That alone should assure that the crime rate will drop by half, to go by the Philippine response rate to crime, which is the fastest in the world: a crime happens and the police are already there.

Why should we wait for atrocities like the one that happened at Luneta last year when a hostage-taker massacred his hostages to demand that the heads of the police and the Department of Interior and Local Government roll for having botched their jobs? What is so different between that and the massacre of journalists? If anything, the latter is worse. So much worse.

Journalists, however they sometimes appear to be a curse, are one of God’s and democracy’s gifts to the world. It’s contemptible how we can allow the very people who try to make us see that “The truth shall set you free” to discover themselves only that “The truth shall make you dead.” The death of one man diminishes us all, said John Donne. Well, the death of one journalist pauperizes us all. The deaths of foreign tourists do not weigh more heavily than the deaths of local journalists. The first can only embarrass us before the world, the second should damn us before our eyes. Law enforcement officials can’t solve the murder of journalists?

Fire them.