Tag Archives: Journalist

[Statement] RED TAGGING: Hands off NUJP-Cagayan de Oro member Cong Corrales and family -NUJP

RED TAGGING: Hands off NUJP-Cagayan de Oro member Cong Corrales and family
February 22, 2019

The National Union of Journalists of the Philippines deplores the inclusion of our member and former director Cong Corrales, his wife and son in an anonymous list naming alleged members of the Communist Party of the Philippines in Cagayan de Oro.

The list also includes religious, lawyers and groups working for human rights and the welfare of the lumad.

There is nothing more cowardly and deplorable than to vilify persons and put them in mortal peril behind the cloak of anonymity.

And as has happened all too often, Red tagging is not mere intimidation. All too often it can be a virtual death sentence.

Even media have not been spared from Red-tagging and other acts clearly intended to intimidaye a critical press into silence, as with the ongoing vilification campaign against the NUJP and the cyberattacks on alternative media.

National Directorate
Hotline +639175155991

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[From the web] Broadcaster, former NUJP-Dumaguete chair, critically wounded in gun attack

Broadcaster, former NUJP-Dumaguete chair, critically wounded in gun attack
April 30, 2018

Motorcycle-riding gunmen shot and seriously wounded a broadcaster and former Dumaguete City chapter chairman of the National Union of Journalists of the Philippines in the capital of Negros Oriental late Monday morning, April 30, 2018.

Edmund Sestoso, who hosts the daily blocktime “Tug-anan” on dyGB 91.7 FM, was on his way home to Barangay Daro after his program when he was attacked around 10 a.m., a close friend of his who asked not to be named for fear of retaliation, told the NUJP.

Between four to five bullets struck Sestoso, two in the chest, the others in the stomach and leg. The source said the gunmen also shot the tires of a pedicab whose driver had intended to rush Sestoso to a hospital.

Good Samaritans had to wait for another vehicle to take the wounded radioman to a health facility, where he was expected to undergo emergency surgery.

The motive for the attack on Sestoso has yet to be determined by authorities.

Reference:
Lottie Salarda
Media Safety Officer
NUJP hotline 0917 515 5991

https://www.facebook.com/notes/nonoy-espina/alert-broadcaster-former-nujp-dumaguete-chair-critically-wounded-in-gun-attack/10155287129686175/

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[People] The War Against Journalists in the Philippines. By Carlos Conde

Dispatches: The War Against Journalists in the Philippines
By Carlos Conde
December 11, 2013

The ongoing deadly attacks on journalists in the Philippines are no less than a war against themedia. In just the past two weeks, the body count in this war has surged: three dead journalists and one wounded in attacks perpetrated by unidentified gunmen.

Carlos_Conde_web  2013 Byba Sepitkova Human Rights Watch

Unidentified attackers shot dead radio journalist Rogelio Butalid in Tagum City on December 11. Police suspect Butalid’s murder was linked to his on-air criticism on Tagum’s Radyo Natin, but have not arrested any suspects.

The previous day, unidentified gunmen on a motorcycle shot and wounded Jhonavin Villalba, a reporter for Aksyon Radyo, at his home in Iloilo City. Police have not released any details on the motives for the attack and there have been no arrests.

On December 6, unidentified gunmen shot dead Michael Milo, a commentator on DXFM in Tandag City. Exactly a week before that, on November 29, another broadcaster, Joash Dignos, was gunned down in Valencia City. Police suspect both attacks were linked to the victims’ on-air commentary, but there have not been any arrests in either case.

These attacks have raised to 12 the number of journalists killed so far in 2013. Altogether, some 26 journalists have been killed in the first 40 months of the administration of President Benigno Aquino III, and no one has been successfully prosecuted in any of these cases.

The Aquino administration’s response has been discouraging. While officials say the government is committed to ending impunity for these attacks, they have nevertheless sought to downplay them. On November 22, a presidential spokesman described the killings of Filipino reporters as “not so serious.”

Such official inaction is unacceptable. The Aquino administration needs to declare that the attacks on journalists are a national catastrophe that threatens fundamental liberties. The police should give priority to investigations of journalist killings and look beyond the gunmen to the individuals ultimately responsible. They should probe threats against journalists to prevent and deter future attacks. The government also needs to work with media companies, particularly broadcast networks, on strategies to better protect journalists.

It’s time for the Philippine government to intervene in the war on the press rather than ignore it.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

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[In the news] Media groups express concern over threats on Kidapawan journalist -MindaNews.com

Media groups express concern over threats on Kidapawan journalist
By Malu Cadelina-Manar , MindaNews.com
January 17, 2013

MindaNewsKIDAPAWAN CITY (MindaNews / 16 Jan) – The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) has joined its affiliate, the National Union of Journalists of the Philippines (NUJP), in expressing concern about reports of a threat against a journalist here.

Reports reaching NUJP said that a texter, who identified himself as a member of the Bagani, was tasked to “silence” Joy Francisco, publisher and editor-in-chief of Southern Voice Journal (SVJ), a weekly tabloid based in this city.

The text, using the mobile phone number 09214095902, was sent to two local radio reporters, one of them Abner Francisco, program director of Charm Radio and columnist of the SVJ, around 8:30 a.m. last Sunday.

When the reporters tried to call the sender, the phone was already out of reach.

It was not clear how the texter was able to get the personal numbers of the reporters.

Read full article @www.mindanews.com

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PH 2nd deadliest country for journalists – CPJ -RAPPLER.com

PH 2nd deadliest country for journalists – CPJ.

PH 2nd deadliest country for journalists – CPJ
by KD Suarez, rappler.com
February 21, 2012

MANILA, Philippines – With at least 72 journalists killed since 1992, the Philippines is the 2nd deadliest country for journalists in 2011, international organization Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) said in its annual report.

The 2011 CPJ ranking was due to the “persistent violence” that journalists, particularly those working in the provinces, face as they do their work, the annual “Attacks on the Press” report said.

The country also ranks 3rd in the Impunity Index, a ranking of countries based on unsolved cases of journalist murders.

Iraq still tops the 2011 list, with 151 unsolved cases as of that year. The Philippines is followed by Algeria (60 cases), Russia (53), Colombia (43), Pakistan (41), Somalia (36), India (27), Mexico (27), and Afghanistan (24).

“Despite high levels of press and Internet freedom, provincial journalists worked under constant threat of reprisal,” the report, released Tuesday, February 21, said.

It cited the murders of journalists Gerry Ortega and Romeo Olea, who were both shot and killed for their reporting in the past year. Both cases are still unsolved.

Read full article @ www.rappler.com

[In the news] Mindanao journalists held overnight by mining firm’s militia -InterAksyon.com

Mindanao journalists held overnight by mining firm’s militia
InterAksyon.com
February 20, 2012

MANILA, Philippines — (UPDATE – 8:43 p.m.) A dozen journalists from Pagadian City were stopped Sunday and held overnight by militiamen detailed to a foreign mining firm the National Union of Journalists of the Philippines said Monday.

The journalists managed to leave area of Sitio Balabag in Barangay Depore, Bayog town, Zamboanga del Sur, late Monday afternoon after the Special Citizens Armed Forces Geographical Unit militia who had held them were “pulled out.”

The group was on its way back after covering the demolition of houses, mostly owned by small-scale miners, at a site targeted for exploration by Canadian firm TVI Resource Development Inc. when their way was blocked by the SCAA, who had even ripped up portions of the road with a backhoe.

Jong Cadion, publisher of Frontline Mindanao Balita, said when asked who had ordered them stopped, the militiamen replied: “’Yung TVI.”

Read full article @ www.interaksyon.com

[In the news] Senator Jinggoy: No prison term for libel – InterAksyon.com

Senator Jinggoy: No prison term for libel
by Karl John C. Reyes, InterAksyon.com
February 2, 2012

Senate President Pro Tempore Jinggoy Ejercito Estrada seeks the abolition of the penalty of imprisonment in libel cases, saying that such a stiff penalty curtails freedom of expression and threatens journalists and other media personnel who criticize or expose erroneous acts.

In Senate Bill 83, one of his priority measures, Estrada said that while a newsman may share his views publicly on controversial issues and individuals, he remains unprotected from the risk of imprisonment if convicted of libel.

Under the Revised Penal Code, one count of libel is punishable with imprisonment of up to six years and one day, and a fine of up to P6,000.

“This loophole is in direct opposition to the freedom of speech and should warrant necessary revisions,” the lawmaker states in the bill’s explanatory note.

“It is an irony that we call our country a land of democracy and yet we have the highest ratings of media killings and intimidation in Asia. Why should a reporter be penalized when he only speaks of the truth or when he voices out his just opinion to the masses who need to know what is going on?” Sen. Estrada said.

Read full article @ www.interaksyon.com

[From the web] When journalists are subpoenaed – RAPPLER.com

When journalists are subpoenaed – RAPPLER – Philippine News | Multimedia | Citizen Journalism | Social Media.
by Chay F. HOFILEÑA, RAPPLER.com
January 31, 2012

Are journalists who are subpoenaed by courts obliged to comply with them? What legitimate reasons are there for not honoring these court orders?

Subpoenas are orders issued by courts to compel persons to appear before them and provide testimony or documents that can aid in the investigation or the resolution of a particular case. Because they are court orders, failure to comply with them may carry penalties, including imprisonment.

Journalists who are subpoenaed, however, often question the reasons behind such an order. If they are called to provide testimony that will reveal their sources or what they know about a particular case or person, chances are, they will refuse on the basis of freedom of the press.

Why so? Because the confidentiality that a journalist promises his or her source is no different from the confidentiality that a priest promises during confession. Also, because a journalist relies on this bedrock relationship of trust with sources – without it, the flow of information will be more restricted and the news-gathering rights of the media will be adversely curtailed.

Compliance with a subpoena could set precedents and influence jurisprudence and even policies, too, that could result in more restrictive press laws.

Read full article @ www.rappler.com

[In the news] ‘Journalists are not the story’ – RAPPLER.com

‘Journalists are not the story’ – RAPPLER – Philippine News | Multimedia | Citizen Journalism | Social Media.

January 27, 2012

 MANILA, Philippines – Veteran journalist and Rappler editor at large Marites Dañguilan-Vitug on Friday, January 27, rejected a prosecution request for her to testify at the impeachment trial of Chief Justice Renato Corona.

On Friday, a press release from the prosecution team announced that they have invited as witnesses 4 journalists, among others.

Aside from Vitug, the prosecution said they will also be summoning to the witness stand the following journalists: Criselda Yabes and Raissa Robles, both freelancers, and Ina Reformina, a reporter of ABS-CBN.

In her letter to lead prosecutor Rep. Niel Tupas, Vitug said: “I am surprised to learn that I am listed as one of the prosecution’s witnesses for Article 7. I have repeatedly explained to your colleagues that I am not going to testify in the impeachment trial. All my works are public and they speak for themselves. And, of course, you know that confidential sources is another matter.”

She added: “Journalists are NOT the story. We tell the story. We merely chronicle our country’s comings and goings in the best way we can. This is how we serve the country.”

Vitug, Yabes, and Robles were speciflcally called to “testify among others on the close personal relationship between Corona and GMA and other allegations contained in the Verified Complaint, and other pleadings filed by complainants, and other matters relevant to the instant case,” according to the press release.

Read full article @ www.rappler.com

[In the news] Chit Estella: Soft-spoken journalist with solid principles – Nation – GMA News Online – Latest Philippine News

Chit Estella: Soft-spoken journalist with solid principles – Nation – GMA News Online – Latest Philippine News.

ANDREO C. CALONZO, GMA News

For her colleagues in the media, the late veteran journalist and university professor Lourdes “Chit” Estella Simbulan will be remembered as the “calm” at the center of the frenzied newsroom.

Broadcast journalist Ed Lingao said Simbulan “broke the stereotype of a reporter” when he first met her covering the Palace beat in the 1980s.

“She was courageous, principled and firm, but was quiet,” he said during a tribute to the veteran journalist on Sunday night.

chit estella vera files

chit estella by vera files

Simbulan, 54, was killed Friday night along Commonwealth Avenue in Quezon City when a wayward passenger bus collided with the taxi cab she was riding in. The driver of the bus fled the scene and has yet to surrender.

Lingao also recalled how Simbulan exuded an “approachable” aura — always welcoming and ready to flash a smile at anyone.

Columnist Ellen Tordesillas, meanwhile, remembers her fellow VERA Files trustee as a “gentle” woman with “rigid” ethical standards.

“When it comes to ethics, hindi siya nagdi-dilemma. Kapag tama, tama (For Chit, what’s right is right. No ifs nor buts),” she said at the same tribute.

Tordesillas also shared how Simbulan would bring packed food when covering government events to avoid eating “lavish” meals offered by officials.

Simbulan also did not find anything amusing about being bribed, and was “disgusted” even by the mere thought of receiving money from her sources.

Vicente Tirol, Chit’s colleague in the tabloid Pinoy Times, for his part, talked about how the late journalist had “lived a principled life.”

“Isa siyang malinis na peryodista. Wala siyang bahid ng korupsyon,” he said.

(Chit was one upright journalist. Not a taint of corruption on her.)

Tirol also recalled how “strict” Simbulan was when it came to editing the tabloid, refusing to accept any write-up which did not meet the deadline.

Best critic

For her widower, Roland Simbulan, she will always be remembered as his “best critic.” “She was not only a good writer and a good editor. She had her way of pointing out what is wrong in a very gentle way,” he said.

He even recalled how Simbulan would correct grammatical errors in his love letters when he was still courting her.

“She was my best critic and I respected that. Akala mo gentle siya, but she was solid as a rock when it comes to principles,” he said.

Mr. Simbulan admitted that he still has “not yet come to terms” with his wife’s death, but believes her inspiration will remain with each and every person she had met.

“I think Chit will continue to live with us if we not only admire her qualities but match these qualities,” he said.

Simbulan’s remains will be cremated on Tuesday morning at the Arlington Memorial Chapel. — MRT/KBK, GMA News

[In the news] Urgent as ever – www.panaynewsphilippines.com

This article is extracted from the Editorial of  Panay News. Below is the Editor’s note and to read full article please follow the link http://www.panaynewsphilippines.com/editorial.htm

(We yield this space to the statement of the Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility on the occasion of World Press Freedom Day, May 3, 2011. – Editor.)

AS in the past, World Press Freedom Day 2011 is being commemorated after a year (May 2010-May 2011) of global and national turmoil.

Iraq and Afghanistan continued to occupy media attention and to subject journalists to the usual perils of covering conflict areas. Five journalists were killed in Iraq in 2010, and two in Afghanistan. And while the unrest in the Middle East and North Africa was among the unique characteristics of 2010-2011, the political crises in Egypt, Tunisia. Yemen, Bahrain, Syria and Libya did subject journalists to the same perils of being killed, threatened, harassed or abducted while doing their jobs. Four journalists were killed in Libya, two in Egypt, and several others abducted.

The Philippine media situation has resisted change despite the change of administration in July 2010. The Ampatuan Massacre trial is continuing, but in terms of results has virtually come to a standstill, bogged down in the tedious processes involved in resolving technical issues, even as the killing of journalists has continued, with nine cases of journalists killed, of which six were work related.

The same ethical and professional shortcomings that have made the media the subject of citizen skepticism and even scorn still haunt media practice, with the performance of the media, whether print, broadcast or online, being uniformly problematic. Plagiarism was a nagging problem, together with sensationalism, lack of fairness and balance, biased reporting, and corruption.

Read full article @ panaynewsphilippines.com