Tag Archives: internet

[From the web] Publication date: Human rights and the internet: The key role of National Human Rights Institutions in protecting human rights in the digital age -APC

Publication date: Human rights and the internet: The key role of National Human Rights Institutions in protecting human rights in the digital age

June 2017
Publisher:APC

The internet is changing the ways in which people interact, trade, learn and communicate. For those who have got access to it, it is becoming increasingly difficult to imagine life without it. It offers us all kinds of opportunities, including exercising our human rights both online and offline, as different United Nations (UN) Human Rights Council resolutions have established.

The internet also holds the promise of being a great equaliser. On the internet, traditionally marginalised people and groups find a space to voice their opinions. They can find information and associate with other people and groups in order to achieve the change they have longed for.

The internet’s role has become so much more relevant today that many governments have tried to regulate it in ways that threaten citizens’ rights. There are many examples: internet shutdowns in whole regions used to limit expression and political participation, harmful laws that try to regulate critical expression on social media, detrimental laws that limit critical expression and justify arbitrary and illegitimate surveillance, etc.

Likewise, almost all our online interactions are made through private platforms; therefore, the human rights of users are also impacted by the role of private companies. For example, private companies have the power to track, trade and sell users’ data. They can also regulate key issues, like online harassment and hate speech according to their own terms of service or community guidelines, which may or may not comply with international human rights law.

There are many hurdles obstructing a full awareness of human rights online. The internet has become a key site of struggle for the full enjoyment of human rights. Human rights violations on the internet are increasing and NHRIs have a key role to play in order to protect and promote them. Rights on the internet are central to NHRIs’ mandates.

Read full article @www.apc.org

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[From the web] Call for Public Inputs to the Philippine Declaration on Internet Rights and Principles-FMA

The Philippine Declaration on Internet Rights and Principles

11219096_10153774235294750_1873502761971435180_nThe Foundation for Media Alternatives (FMA) and the Internet Society Philippines held The Future of #PHInternet, the first-ever Philippine Multistakeholder Forum on Internet Governance, Human Rights, and Development last March 2015, as part of its RightsCon Southeast Asia activities. In this milestone forum that was attended by around 150 civil society, tech experts, government officials, private sector representatives from all over the Philippines, as well as global ICT policy experts, the initiative to develop a Philippine Declaration on Internet Rights and Principles was launched.

FMA

The Philippine Declaration on Internet Rights and Principles hopes to be the document that would reflect our dreams, hopes, and aspirations of what the Philippine Internet should be. It can guide public education, advocacy, networking, and campaigning efforts on ICT, human rights, and development.

Read full article @http://104.236.169.13/FMA/?p=416

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[Event] Future of #PhInternet: A Philippine Multistakeholder Forum on Internet Governance, Human Rights, and Development

Vote for this article for the 5th HR Pinduteros’ Choice Awards

FMA

The Foundation for Media Alternatives (FMA) & the Internet Society Philippines (ISOCPh)

in partnership with the Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA),

Dakila Artist Collective, and the Philippine Internet Freedom Alliance (PIFA),

with support from the Association for Progressive Communications, Internews,

SMART Communications, and Microosft,

will hold the first-ever “Future of #PhInternet: A Philippine Multistakeholder Forum on Internet Governance, Human Rights, and Development”

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

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[Press Release] Legal but not legit says Amnesty International on SC ruling for cyber-libel -AIph

Legal but not legit says Amnesty International on SC ruling for cyber-libel

“News of the Supreme Court decision to uphold the cyber-libel provision of the Cybercrime Prevention Act is a cause of concern for the enjoyment of freedom of expression as it cements the further expansion of the reach of the highly questionable Philippine Libel Law handed down from penal laws of former colonial administrations,” said Romel Cardenas De Vera, Human Rights Officer of Amnesty International Philippines, in a statement.

AI small

In September 2012, the Cybercrime Prevention Act was signed into law. A month after, a temporary restraining order was issued, which was later on extended pending the decision of the Supreme Court after 16 petitions questioning the law were filed by human rights groups, Internet users, journalists, bloggers, and academics. Oral deliberations followed in January 2013.

“The Supreme Courts’ decision to strike down provisions that are unconstitutional but leaving space for online libel, which is constitutional as far as the original author is concerned, gives mixed signals as it still rolls back protections for free speech in the Philippines. It remains that under this provision, a peaceful posting on the Internet could still result in a prison sentence,” explained De Vera.

The law has broadly extended criminal libel to apply to acts committed through a computer system or any other similar means which may be devised in the future.

“There is so much that the citizens of the Philippines have to speak out about as the country suffers from widespread corruption and poverty and also having one of the worst records on extra judicial killings of activists and journalists in the Maguindanao Massacre,” recalls De Vera.

De Vera added that the cyber-libel provision is a late inclusion to the Cybercrime Prevention Bill when it was still in both Houses of Congress.

“Many of the multimillion peso libel cases filed in our Philippine courts were by legislators, executive officials and even a sitting Supreme Court Justice. It is not farfetched that the cyber libel provision will be used against anyone seeking state and corporate accountability for abuses and violations of human rights,” De Vera said.

In January 2011, the UN Human Rights Committee found the Philippines’s criminalization of libel to be “incompatible” with the freedom of expression clause in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

“The UNHRC has already decided on October 2011 that our libel law is inconsistent with the enjoyment of freedom of expression as enshrined in Article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) which the Philippines had ratified,” added De Vera.

Article 2.2 of the ICCPR states that ‘each State Party to the present Covenant undertakes to take the necessary steps, in accordance with its constitutional processes and with the provisions of the present Covenant, to adopt such laws or other measures as may be necessary to give effect to the rights recognized in the present Covenant’.

“The Philippine government must focus on making our laws in consonance with international human rights standards and not strengthen more laws used for stifling dissent against those in authority. Amnesty International believes that the Supreme Court must hear petitions for review of its ruling and abide by our international human rights obligations.” Concluded De Vera.

Source: amnesty.org.ph

Amnesty International Philippines
Press Release
19 February 2014

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[From the web] Visionary internet activist Aaron Swartz found dead; was this brilliant internet revolutionary taken out?

Visionary internet activist Aaron Swartz found dead; was this brilliant internet revolutionary taken out?.
January 13, 2013
by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger
Editor of NaturalNews.com

Adding to the list of mysterious deaths that have happened over the last few days, internet visionary and brilliant internet activist Aaron Swartz was found dead yesterday. Swartz, only 26 years old, was the co-founder of Reddit.com, the co-creator of RSS technology, and the key activist who achieved a stunning defeat of the freedom-crushing SOPA / PIPA bills in the U.S. Congress.

Swartz was found dead yesterday, and the official story is that he committed suicide. But Swartz himself would have wanted us to question the official story and dig deeper.

After all, his own website, Demand Progress, questions the “PROTECT-IP” act, the insanity of George Bush’s Patriot Act, the censorship of free speech by Facebook, the financial scams of Goldman Sachs, the internet kill switch and much more.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/038650_Aaron_Swartz_suicide_assassination.html#ixzz2IDu5OZyo

Read full article @www.naturalnews.com

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[In the news] Anger at suicide of US Internet activist -InterAksyon.com

Anger at suicide of US Internet activist
By Agence France-Presse
January 14, 2013

InterAksyon logo2WASHINGTON DC – The death of prominent Internet freedom fighter Aaron Swartz, who took his own life at the age of 26, weeks before he faced trial, sparked grief and anger Sunday from online rights advocates.

“Aaron did more than almost anyone to make the Internet a thriving ecosystem for open knowledge, and to keep it that way,” wrote Peter Eckersley from California-based activist group Electronic Frontier Foundation.

“He refined advocacy for the progressive and open-information movement,” said David Moon, program director for Demand Progress, a grassroots organization that Swartz co-founded to combat Internet censorship.

Swartz, who was just 14 when he co-developed the RSS feeds that are now the norm for publishing frequent updates online and went on to help launch social news website Reddit, hanged himself in his New York apartment on Friday.

Read full article @interaksyon.com

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[Press Release] Cyber-Perling: Early Halloween Special -Dakila

Cyber-Perling: Early Halloween Special

The recent arrest and maltreatment of Ms. Esperlita Garcia, environmentalist from Nueva Vizcaya has once again put the Cybercrime Law in question. More known as Perling, the 62-year old grandmother posted statements against a Chinese and Taiwanese firm on their mining operations, which was taken as “malicious and defamatory” by the latter which led her to be sued by no less than the Mayor of their town, Carlito Pentecostes.

While the case against Perling is said to be under the Revised Penal Code and not the Cybercrime Law, the fact still remains that Perling was arrested for a Facebook post that stated out factual events, only taken badly by a public official.

Time and again, the government has been saying that the Cybercrime Law will not be used against ordinary citizens and will not be used to trample on rights of Filipinos. Maybe the President will not use it against us nor will Sec. Leila de Lima of DOJ, but we, in Dakila, opponents of the Cybercrime Law, have been saying that someday, someone will and now, someone already has.

Digital media has become a force to reckon with and has contributed a lot to activism. Posts like Perling’s, no matter how factual, will always be found “malicious and defamatory” by those who are on the other side. But it is also posts like these that need to get out there and be known to the people. The Cybercime Law merely poses a hindrance for these kinds of information to reach citizens and will be abused by the powerful against the powerless.

We, netizens and digital activists, need to continue our vigilance over the Cybercrime Law and continue the pressure on public officials for its repeals because our fears against the Cybercrime Law are no longer just fears, they are slowly coming true and Cyber-Perling is but an early Halloween special. ##

DAKILA – Philippine Collective for Modern Heroism
Unit 3A, VS1 Bldg., 34 Kalayaan Avenue, Quezon City
Cellular: (0905) 4292539
Tel. No.:(02) 4354309
E-mail: mabuhay@dakila.org.ph
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Follow us on Twitter: dakila_ph

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2nd HR Pinduteros Choice Awards

2nd HR Pinduteros Choice Awards

In celebration of the coming 2012 Human Rights Week in December and as a way to give thanks to HR Defenders who continued their support by patronizing and contributing online articles, photos, statement, press releases and other resources, HRonlinePH.com is holding its 2nd HR Pinduteros Choice Awards.

The HR Pinduteros Choice Awards is an online event that aims to give recognition to human rights defenders’ online activities (Individuals and groups) that informed, inspired and mobilized the online readers to our common cause that is to promote, defend and assert human rights utilizing the internet as a tool.

Online polling and popularization of the event also hopes to contribute in increasing awareness and build up for the international HR day celebration in December 10, 2012 through encouraging the netizens to visit and learn more about human rights issues, campaigns and etc. posted and featured in different HR sites.

Human Rights Pinduteros is a community of internet users, HR advocates and activist who as a network promote and defend HR and believe in HRonlinePH.com’s call to inform, inspire and mobilize our readers to our cause online and offline.

“2nd HR Pinduteros Choice Awards” aims to:

1. Encourage active HR promotions and posting
2. Recognize online efforts for human rights
3. Promote HR activities online and offline
4. Encourage more readers and patronage for HR sites and causes

Recognitions/Categories for HRonlinePH pinduteros’ (readers’) choice 2012
• 2012 most clicked HR bloggers
• 2012 most clicked HR website
• Top HR bloggers posts 2012
• Top HR networks post 2012
• Top HR event 2012
• Top HR photo 2012
• Top HR off the shelf 2012
• Top HR video 2012

Mechanics

Nominees were chosen from the top items per category posted in HRonlinePH.com based on the hits generated from the period of October 2011 to September 30, 2012.

50% of the score for winning post will be based on HRonlinePH.com statistics

50% will be based on an online voting/polling which will be held from the period of October 2012 to November 30 2012.

Winners will be announced and awarded during the HR week 2012 celebration. (Exact date and venue to be announced)

[In the news] Senate inserted Section 19: How the ‘take-down’ clause emerged in Cybercrime Law -InterAksyon.com

Senate inserted Section 19: How the ‘take-down’ clause emerged in Cybercrime Law
By Karl John C. Reyes, InterAksyon.com
October 2, 2012

MANILA, Philippines – The notorious ‘take-down’ provision in the Anti-Cybercrime Act which empowers the Department of Justice (DOJ) to restrict or block access to computer data was ‘inserted’ in the Senate version of the bill, details further coming into light now establish.

A review by Interaksyon.com of the May 31, 2012, minutes of the Bicameral Conference Committee that worked to reconcile Senate Bill No. 2796 and House Bill No. 5808 into what would ultimately become the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012, shows the provenance of the law’s controversial Section 19.

A provision for “Restricting or Blocking Access to Computer Data” first appeared as Section 13 in the Senate. This was later moved as Section 18.

“Okay, Now, Section 13 of the Senate version will now become Section 18, Restricting or Blocking Access to Computer Data,” the minutes quote conference committee member Sen. Edgardo Angara. Sen. Vicente Sotto III had earlier tagged Angara as the man responsible for Section 19 which, among other things, empowers the DOJ to restrict access to computer data, potentially allowing for the blocking of websites, experts say, without benefit of a warrant or court order. “When a computer data is prima facie, et cetera, et cetera,” Angara is on record as saying.

Angara, chairman of the Congressional Commission on Science, Technology and Engineering (COMSTE), had sponsored the bill in the Senate.

In the final version of the consolidated bill under Republic Act 101751 signed by President Benigno Aquino III on September 12, 2012, Section 18, as agreed upon in the Bicameral Conference Committee, was then re-numbered as Section 19. It ultimately reads: “Restricting or Blocking Access to Computer Data – When a computer data is prima facie found to be in violation of the provisions of this Act, the DOJ shall issue an order to restrict or block access to such computer data.”

Read full article @ www.interaksyon.com

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[From the web] How the Cybercrime Law criminalizes ‘Likes’ and tweets – InterAksyon.com

ANALYSIS | How the Cybercrime Law criminalizes ‘Likes’ and tweets
By Atty. Mel Sta. Maria, News5
September 28, 2012

Atty. Sta. Maria teaches at the Ateneo School of Law, and is the resident legal analyst of News5.

Last May, Interaksyon.com posted news about how a judge in the United States had ruled that “Liking” something on Facebook is not necessarily Constitutionally protected speech. The ruling has been criticized as threatening to free speech, as well as for being out of touch with how Facebook and its users behave.

Some of the questions and criticisms lobbed against the US judgment are relevant to Filipinos now, as the country wakes to a new Cybercrime Law that will have great implications for free expression online.

Consider these following points:

Republic Act 10175, the Cybercrime Law, is a special law.

What does that mean?

It is an accepted legal rule that offenses under special laws are considered MALA PROHIBITA as distinguished from MALA IN SE. In the latter, there must be a criminal mind to be convicted. In murder, theft, robbery and other offenses punished by our Revised Penal Code, for example, intention to do wrong is an essential element. In the former, MALA PROHIBITA, there need not be a criminal mind. The mere perpetuation of the prohibited act is enough.

Read full article @ www.interaksyon.com

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[In the news] Lawyers, bloggers urge takedown of Cybercrime Law -GMANews.com

Lawyers, bloggers urge takedown of Cybercrime Law
SHAIRA PANELA, GMA NEWS
September 26, 2012

With one of the biggest and most active online communities in the world, the Philippines stands much to gain —or lose— from the enactment and implementation of the controversial Cybercrime Prevention Act (RA 10175), which was signed into law last September 12.

International social media research group Socialbakers ranked the Philippines as the eigth largest country in the world in terms of number of Facebook users, with more than 29 million Pinoys on the social network. The country is also the tenth largest nation on Twitter, with over 9.5 million users.

It is in this context a petition for certiorari and prohibition was filed before the Supreme Court on September 25 by lawyers Jose Jesus “JJ” Disini, Jr., Rowena S. Disini, and Liane Ivy P. Medina; and bloggers Ernesto Sonido Jr. and Janette Toral.

According to the petitioners, the Cybercrime Act violates Constitutional provisions on the “freedom of expression, due process, equal protection, privacy of communications, double jeopardy, and right against unreasonable searches and seizure.”

The respondents included the secretaries of Justice and of the Interior and Local Government; the executive director of the Information and Communications Technology Office (ICTO); the chief of the Philippine National Police (PNP); and the director of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI).

Read full article @ www.gmanetwork.com

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[From the web] Cybercrime law: Demonizing technology

Cybercrime law: Demonizing technology.

BY SEN. TEOFISTO ‘TG’ GUINGONA III
September 26, 2012

I own a Facebook page where people are welcome to make comments, positive or negative. I also own a public Twitter account where my views are published for everyone to see.

If any of my own thoughts or the thoughts expressed by people on these accounts that I own happens to offend someone, I can now be charged for libel under the newly enacted Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012. Suddenly, I can be punished for expressing critical thought online or allowing my Facebook friends to do the same on my own page.

With this law, even Mark Zuckerberg, the owner of Facebook, can be charged with cyber-libel!

A Cybercrime Prevention Act is necessary, but must not be oppressive.

Republic Act 10175 is oppressive and dangerous. It demonizes the computer user and extends its tentacles to a computer user’s freedom of expression and speech. In an age when decriminalization of libel is the trend, this law makes a fatal step back, toward the vault of archaic policies that cannot be made to apply to the modern man operating in a modern world.

Let me just point out the fact that we need a Cybercrime Prevention Act. Except for certain problematic provisions, this law is necessary. That’s why it is unfortunate that the overly vague and oppressive provision on libel was inserted into the law at the last minute.

Read full article @ www.rappler.com

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[Featured Photo] Policemen to the rescue

Viral FB photo of two police men in action. Photo by Modernize the Philippine Navy Facebook page.

Filipino netizens salute our rescuer/men in uniform as they perform their duties.  As of 6:00 in August 8, 2012, this photo generated 44,816 likes, 9,049 shares and 3,733 comments.

Photo source: Modernize the Philippine Navy FB page

See more of their posts @ https://www.facebook.com/pages/Modernize-the-Philippine-Navy/198144786905060

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[Solidarity] Internet Black Out Day campaign on August 14 by Malaysian NGOs for internet freedom – Forum Asia

Dear friends,

The amendments to the Evidence Act in Malaysia hold all internet users liable for content appearing in their blogs and websites and shift the burden of proof to the owner of the blogs and websites. This severely impacts internet freedom, freedom of expression and the right to be presumed innocent before proven guilty. Now, there is a Internet Black Out Day campaign on August 14 by Malaysian NGOs, including FORUM-ASIA’s member, SUARAM against the Evidence Act and to call for the withdrawal of the amendments.

Please support this campaign in whatever way you can. The campaign is led by Center for Independent Journalists (CIJ) at http://cijmalaysia.org/2012/08/07/cij-to-launch-internet-blackout-day-on-14-august/
For more information about the Internet Blackout Day and to take part in the campaign, please visit:

1. The official blog at stop114a.wordpress.com

2. The Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/evidenceamendmentact.

3. Stop 114A’s Twibbon page for Twitter: http://twibbon.com/join/Stop-114A

4. Stop 114A’s Twibbon page for Facebook: http://twibbon.com/cause/Stop-114A/facebook

For additional information, please contact CIJ via e-mail at cijmalaysia@gmail.com or call us at 03-4023 0772.

in solidarity,

Yap

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