Tag Archives: Domestic violence

[Video] Buhay-bahay (Situation of Women and Children Under Lockdown) -iDEFEND, PAHRA

Situation of Women and Children Under Lockdown

Kasama sina:

Jelen Paclarin
Executive Director,
Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau (WLB)

Dr. Maria Lourdes Mendoza
Women and Children Protection Unit,
Northern Mindanao Medical Center

Julie Ann Regalado
Division Chief, Child Rights Center
Commission on Human Rights

Rowena Legaspi
Executive Director,
Children’s Legal and Research Development Center (CLRD)

Krissi Shaffina Twyla Rubin
OIC,
Center for Gender Equality and Women’s Human Rights
Commission on Human Rights

Moderator:
Ritz Lee Santos III
Executive Director,
Balay Alternative Legal Advocates for Development in Mindanaw Inc. (BALAOD Mindanaw)

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[Campaign] V-MEN -Even the men are rising against poverty and violence

V Men

V-MEN are the men who rise with the women in advocating for women’s rights and an end to all forms of violence against women. STRIKE! DANCE! RISE!

Visit and like V-MEN @https://www.facebook.com/vmen.philippines

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[Event] Call to #TakeBacktheTech to Promote and Protect Women’s Human Rights in the Philippines

Sign up for 16 days of blogging on your thoughts around violence against women. Start a debate, share an idea, document your experience, pass on information, exercise your right to expression to end violence against women. Blog with us!

Call to #TakeBacktheTech to Promote and Protect Women’s Human Rights in the Philippines

We have seen how thousands of Filipinos mobilize to protect Internet Freedom against the Philippine CyberMartialLaw. For the 16 days of activism against gender-based violence let us be proactive and once again make use of information and communication technology – ICT-to create an online culture that protect women and girls from violence. Let us create an online space that is safe and secure; that provide women and girls venue for empowerment. Let us mobilize to make the abuse heard. Let us collectively provide alternative mechanisms to address women’s rights violations through ICTs and on ICT platforms. We have to stand together and take control of technology to make sure that we strengthen our freedoms. Let us amplify our united voice and demand what we all want – FREEDOMS not FEARS.

Read more @ https://www.takebackthetech.net

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[From the web] UN Special Representative on violence against children presented a report to the human rights council -www.childrightscoalitionasia.org

UN Special Representative on violence against children presented a report to the human rights council

The UN Special Representative of the Secretary General (SRSG) on violence against children, Ms. Martha Santos Pais, presented her third report to the Human Rights Council during its Interactive Dialogue on on Violence and Sale of Children held last March 7, 2012. The SRSG reported international developments with regards to enhanced protection of children from violence marked by increasing commitment of states to ratify international human rights standards and to undertake measures at the regional and national level. Despite such developments, the SRSG requested the council to rally firm support to overcome persisting challenges and speed up global progress towards a world free from violence.

In her speech to the Human Rights Council, the SRSG reported the initiatives undertaken during the second year of her mandate. Her office undertaken global advocacy to raise awareness and strengthen political action to consolidate children’s protection from violence. To achieve this, she reported that her office supported the global campaign towards the ratification of the Optional Protocols to the CRC.

Another key component of her mandate is to collaborate with regional organizations and institutions which led to adoption of political declarations and regional agenda to strengthen and galvanize commitment and action to address violence. Included in the list of regional commitments is the strategic cooperation framework with the ASEAN Commission on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC).

Read full article @ www.childrightscoalitionasia.org

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[In the news] Emotional abuse: Most common type of domestic violence -GMA News

Emotional abuse: Most common type of domestic violence

Veronica Pulumbarit, GMA News
March 10, 2012

The Pinoy Abroad section of GMA News Online is running a series of articles on gender-based violence to help empower women and enlighten men. We now turn our attention to EMOTIONAL ABUSE, the most common type of domestic violence.

Angela’s husband has never hit her. Still, she lives in fear of him as he constantly ridicules and scolds her for every little mistake she makes.

According to the United States-based magazine “Psychology Today,” one of the worst things that can happen to a person is to live with an emotional abuser.

Psychological or emotional abuse is the most common type of violence experienced by women and children and is deemed by many as the “worst kind of abuse,” the New Zealand-based non-profit group Women’s Refuge said.

The United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women (1993)
defines violence against women as any act that results in “physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women.”

Specifically, the UN defines domestic violence as a violent act perpetrated by intimate
partners through:
physical abuse (such as slapping, beating, arm twisting, stabbing, strangling, burning, choking, kicking, threats with an object or weapon, murder, genital mutilation, and others);
sexual abuse (such as coerced sex, intimidation or physical force, forcing unwanted sexual acts or forcing sex with others);
psychological abuse (includes intimidation, persecution, threats of abandonment or abuse, confinement to the home, surveillance, threats to take away custody of the children, destruction of objects, isolation, verbal aggression, and constant humiliation), and
economic abuse (includes denial of funds, refusal to contribute financially, denial of food and basic needs, and controlling access to health care, employment, etc.)

Read full article @ www.gmanetwork.com

[From the web] Third Press Release of the ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC)

Third Press Release of the ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC)

Vientiane, Lao PDR, 18 February 2012

The ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) concluded its Fourth Meeting which was convened from 16-18 February 2012 in Vientiane, Lao PDR.

At this Meeting, the ACWC’s work plan for 2012-2016 was concretized to ensure that the Commission’s journey in the next five years would bring impacts to women and children in the region. Among the activities/projects identified are publication of the compilation of good practices in combating violence against women and children in ASEAN and establishment of an ACWC network of social service agencies involved in preventing, protecting and helping victims of violence against women and children in ASEAN.

Projects and activities that were identified at the ACWC’s Consultation Meeting with the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General on Violence against Children (SRSG-VAC) and prominent international experts on elimination of violence against women on 16-17 January 2012, and the ACWC’s Dialogue with civil society on 18 January 2012 in Manila, the Philippines, were taken into consideration in developing ACWC’s 2012-2016 work plan.

Read full article @ www.asean.org

[Statement] Dakila statement on violence against women

DAKILA STATEMENT ON VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN
November 25, 2011

For many years, women have fought for gender equality and their rightful place in society. And in the past decade or so, it has been said that women have gained leverage from where they stood half a century ago. Today, there are more women presidents leading their countries; CEO’s leading their companies; engineers building infrastructures. As things that were deemed solely for men have now become accessible to women, we cannot deny that indeed, women have come a long way.

But how much equality has really been given to women in this society? Is gender equality really almost achieved as seen by many or are all these just a façade of where women stand in society? How far have women really gone?

We say women have gone far but one thing has not changed over the years – violence against women. This continues to haunt women all over the world. Violence against women such as rape, human trafficking, sexual assault, and domestic violence are still things women have to fear.

When will women feel safe walking home alone at night? When will a woman be able to assert herself without fear that her husband will hit her? When will women stop being violated? Violence against women only shows how much women are being valued – and it’s not that high. Women continue to be objectified and assaulted. Only if and when the fear of violence against women has ceased can we say that women have gained respect and that we have come close to gender equality.

Time and again, women have proven their importance in every aspect of society – from building the family to building the nation. Dakila calls the end to violence against women. We call for our society to allow women to live without fear for it is only when they live fearlessly can they truly grow. And only when women have grown can we truly move forward and develop as a nation.

DAKILA – Philippine Collective for Modern Heroism
Unit 3A, VS1 Bldg., 34 Kalayaan Avenue, Quezon City
Cellular: (0905) 4292539
Tel. No.:(02) 4354309
E-mail:   mabuhay@dakila.org.ph
Website: http://www.dakila.org.ph
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dakila.philippines
Follow us on Twitter: dakila_ph

[From the web] Top UN officials highlight youth leadership in ending violence against women- www.un.org

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon speaks at event to mark International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women

Source: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=40494&Cr=violence+against+women&Cr1=

23 November 2011 –
Top United Nations officials today called for engaging all of society, and especially young people, to end violence against women, a scourge that spans the globe and takes many forms, including rape, domestic violence and harassment at work.

“Whether in developing or developed countries, the pervasiveness of this unacceptable violence should shock us all,” Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said at an event in New York to mark the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.

“Violence – and in many cases the mere threat of it – is one of the most significant barriers to women’s full equality,” he added.

This year’s Day, observed annually on 25 November, focuses on youth leadership in preventing and ending gender-based violence.

“Our challenge,” said Mr. Ban, “is to ensure that the message of ‘zero tolerance’ is heard far and wide. To do that, we must engage all of society – and especially young people – and in particular young men and boys.”

He highlighted the need to promote “healthy models of masculinity,” and in particular encourage young men and boys to become advocates for change.

“I urge governments and partners around the world to harness the energy, ideas and leadership of young people to help us to end this pandemic. Only then will we have a more just, peaceful and equitable world.”

In a separate message for the Day, Mr. Ban said the right of women and girls to live free of violence is “inalienable and fundamental” and enshrined in international human rights and humanitarian law.

It also lies at the heart of the “UNiTE to End Violence against Women” campaign that the Secretary-General launched in 2008 that has galvanized governments, civil society, the corporate sector, athletes, artists, women, men and young people around the world to end the pandemic.

Mr. Ban also urged governments and the private sector to increase their support to the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women, which is marking 15 years of giving grants to support innovative regional, local and national projects.

The fund has delivered grants worth $77 million to 339 initiatives in 126 countries and territories since it was established in 1997. However, demand for support continues to outstrip resources, the Secretary-General said, noting that this year alone, the fund has received more than 2,500 applications requesting nearly $1.2 billion. Mr. Ban said an additional $100 million in annual donations is needed.

The Executive Director of UN Women, Michelle Bachelet, for her part, called on world leaders to mobilize political will and investment to ensure that women can live a life without violence.

“Violence against women is not solely a women’s issue,” she stated in her message for the Day. “It diminishes each and every one of us. We need to come together to end it. By coming together, by standing up against violence against women, we will come closer to peace, justice and equality.”

According to UN Women, 125 countries have specific laws that penalize domestic violence, and equality between women and men is guaranteed in 139 countries and territories. But women continue to be subjected to violence, with estimates indicating that up to six in 10 women have suffered physical and/or sexual violence in their lifetime, a majority from their husbands or partners.

Ms. Bachelet outlined 16 concrete policy actions to end violence against women, including revising laws, providing universal access to emergency services for survivors, engaging men and boys, and bringing perpetrators to justice.

In a related development, the UN released a report today stating that Afghanistan has a long way to go before its women are fully protected from violence and their equality is properly upheld through the landmark Elimination of Violence against Women (EVAW) law enacted two years ago.

The report, produced by the UN human rights office (OHCHR) and the UN mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA), makes 32 recommendations to the Government and its international partners to improve implementation of the law, including raising greater awareness of the law among Afghan women and men and within all levels of the Government.

[In the news] DepEd won’t tolerate child abuse – www.mb.com.ph

DepEd won’t tolerate child abuse
By INA HERNANDO-MALIPOT

MANILA, Philippines — The Department of Education (DepEd) vowed Tuesday to get tougher on violence against children in schools to shield the students against abuse, exploitation and discrimination, including bullying and other forms of violence.

According to Education Secretary Armin Luistro, a more comprehensive child protection policy will soon be implemented by the DepEd to remind school personnel and the public – in general – that “corporal punishment and violence in any form is not allowed in public schools whether committed by adults or the children’s peers.”

Luistro reiterated that school personnel who commit such acts are violating the provisions of Batas Pambansa 232 and “that they can be held criminally liable including dismissal from the service.”

Meanwhile, Republic Act 7610 listed down acts that constitute child abuse and are therefore considered a criminal offense. This includes psychological and physical abuse, neglect, cruelty, sexual abuse and emotional maltreatment. Also included is any act by deeds or words which debase, degrade or demean the worth and dignity of a child; unreasonable deprivation of his basic needs for survival such as food and shelter; as well as failure to immediately give medical treatment to an injured child resulting to serious impairment of his growth, permanent incapacity or death.

Read full article @ www.mb.com.ph

[Press Release] CLRD launched its CARE center at Barangay Bagong Silang in Caloocan

CLRD launched its CARE center at Barangay Bagong Silang in Caloocan. Photo by CLRD

On 25 August 2011, the Children’s Legal Rights and Development Center (CLRD), Inc. has launched its new program at Barangay Bagong Silang dubbed as “Children’s Action Resource Education” (CARE) Center.  In partnership with DKA-Austria, the program will run for three years beginning this year.

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