Tag Archives: COVID-19ph

[Statement] Together, let us put hope in the hearts of each other while not forsaking our principles on human rights and social justice -BALAY

Together, let us put hope in the hearts of each other while not forsaking our principles on human rights and social justice

As we enter the second wave of the enhanced community quarantine and the national health emergency it is understandable that many of us are already reeling from the impact of our protective distancing, work from home, or self-isolation. It would be not uncommon for fear and anxieties to arise due to the sudden disruption of the life that we are used to. As the health and life-threatening contagion persists and continues to take its toll on human lives, many of us could be driven to react in a manner that could project our own fears and existential insecurity. Times like this can either bring out the best or the worse in us.

The so-called social distancing that we are told to practice is borne out of compelling reasons of personal and public health and safety. It would be helpful to be reminded, however, that ‘social distancing’ does not mean social division or fragmentation. Neither does it mean discriminating others or wishing them ill. Social distancing as a protective measure should be seen as an exercise of malasakit – ayaw natin na magkasakit ang kapwa natin, at ayaw din natin na tayo ay mapahamak. This is a reciprocal display of kindness, humility, and compassion. This is respect in action – a core tenet of human rights.

From a public health perspective, the restriction of movement is an astringent but necessary measure to prevent or slow down the spread of the contagion and its ill-effects to human lives and society. By doing so, our seriously challenged but valiant health care system would stand a chance to gradually cope with the immensity of the crisis, at the same time buying time for the unprepared authorities to progressively set up an effective response to serve the best interest of the public (especially those in the ‘existential periphery’), and for the scientific community to achieve a breakthrough in treatment and prevention.

We have to acknowledge that it is the primary obligation of the government to introduce measures to impede the spread of COVID-19. Mandated authorities have the responsibility to undertake a range of additional actions to reduce the potentially negative impact such measures may have on people’s lives. As we encourage and support measures to promote public health and safety, the following human rights standards could be used as our guidepost:

1. Any measure taken to protect the population that limits people’s rights and freedoms must be lawful, necessary, and proportionate. The state of emergency needs to be limited in duration and any curtailment of rights needs to take into consideration the disproportionate impact on specific populations or marginalized groups. Such group includes those on low incomes, poor urban communities, and those in isolated rural populations. Attention and care must also be extended to the homeless and persons living in the streets, people with underlying health conditions, people with disabilities and older people living alone or in institutions. Children at risk and children in conflict with the law must be protected from violence (such as torture and ill-treatment), abuse, and discrimination as well.

2. The emergency declarations based on the COVID-19 outbreak should be based on scientific evidence and neither arbitrary nor discriminatory in the application; and of limited duration, respectful of human dignity, and subject to review. The so-called lockdown and special authority should also not be used as a basis to target particular groups, minorities, or individuals. It should not function as a cover for repressive action under the guise of protecting health; it should not be used simply to quash dissent.

3. During the quarantines or lockdowns period, the concerned state agencies and governing authorities are obligated to ensure access to food, water, health care, and caregiving support. Ensuring continuity of these services and operations means that public agencies, community organizations, health care providers, and other essential service providers are able to continue performing essential functions to meet the needs of older people and people with disabilities. They require support from governments in terms of transportation, protective gear, and other assistance to lower their risk of exposure and of being overworked.

4. People who are already barely surviving economically may all too easily be pushed over the edge by measures being adopted to contain the virus. Authorities need to be ready to respond in a range of ways to unintended consequences of their actions aimed at the coronavirus. Workers who are forced to stay or work from home, and those with no means to fend for themselves, have to be supported through subsidies, social security assistance, advance payment of wages or early release of 13 month pay, as may be practicable. Businesses have the moral and legal obligation to do their share to protect those who bring profits to them.

5. Persons found to be in violation of the quarantine policy should be treated in a lawful manner but with due humanitarian considerations. The health emergency declaration is not the same as martial law. The principle of civilian supremacy, rule of law and due process, and accountability of government authorities remain in place. The writ of habeas corpus is not suspended either.

6. The right to health provides that health facilities, goods, and services should be: available in sufficient quantity, accessible to everyone without discrimination, and affordable for all, even marginalized groups including for people deprived of liberty; acceptable, meaning respectful of medical ethics and culturally appropriate; and scientifically and medically appropriate and of good quality.

7. Authorities that operate prisons, jails, and immigration detention centers should publicly disclose their plans of action to reduce the risk of coronavirus infection in their facilities and the steps they will take to contain the infection and protect prisoners, prison staff, and visitors, if cases of the virus or exposure to it are present. Persons in any form of detention have the same right to health as the non-incarcerated population and are entitled to the same standards of prevention and treatment. The detained population and the general population have a compelling interest to know in advance what plans authorities have put in place for handling COVID-19.

8. Governments should ensure that the information they provide to the public regarding COVID-19 is accurate, timely, and consistent with human rights principles. In addition, there should be harmonized information from the mandated government agencies. This is important for addressing false and misleading information and to prevent panic and confusion of public.

Obviously, it could be a difficult balancing act for the authorities when hard decisions need to be taken. However efforts to combat the virus won’t work unless it is approached holistically, which means taking great care to protect the most vulnerable and neglected people in society, both medically and economically.

9. To engage and ask the national government agencies particularly the Inter Agency Task Force on COVID 19 Response and the local government units to harness the participation of the civil society ie NGOs and people’s organizations in supporting government efforts to manage this large-scale disaster. Based on experience, civil society provide context and are familiar with the culture and norms of a locality. They provide additional knowledge and support relevant in these trying times when frontliners and resources are starting to becoming dearth.

10. We enjoin our fellow civil society organizations to be vigilant, to express concern on how dissent is responded to arising from confusion due to the crisis. We request them to check, monitor and evaluate human rights principles during these times.

11. We are facing a new normal and we thank the international funding partners for the technical and financial support they continue to provide throughout this period. We ask them to extend further empathy, understanding and consideration as part of solidarity.

12. We urge the Balay community – its general members, board of directors and staff to stay strong, together, with our partner-beneficiaries and partner-stakeholders.

At these trying times, we, Balay Rehabilitation Center, as member of the civil society – are being invited to build bridges of understanding and solidarity, and not to sow interpersonal intrigues or social division. The virus transcends ideology and partisan politics. We must do the same, with the core values and concept of human rights and kapwa-tao as our guiding principles. Contributing ideas and providing practical support based on a human rights discourse should be a shared standpoint of the government, civil society, and the private sector. It should not intend to undermine affirmative actions to bring the contagions under control, rather it should help in public education, foster principled humanitarian solidarity, and help facilitate the implementation of measures undertaken by government that protect, promote, and fulfil the right to health and safety, survival, and fundamental freedoms.

We may be physically distant to one another, but we can still cross the socio-spatial landscape by communicating and reaching out to each other – to our families, to our friends, to our partners, and to the larger human community. The situation urges us to convey our concern, provide helpful factual information, offer a listening heart, contribute to the shaping and implementation of sound public policy, and inspire each other and offer practical support, if we can.

Together, let us put hope in the hearts of each other while not losing sight of what’s ahead, not forgetting our values, and not forsaking our principles on human rights and social justice. Let us join hands in this struggle to fight COVID-19.

14 April 2020

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[Statement] of CHR Spokesperson, Atty. Jacqueline Ann de Guia, on recent COVID-19 measures that impact the right to privacy and free choice of employment

Statement of CHR Spokesperson, Atty. Jacqueline Ann de Guia, on recent COVID-19 measures that impact the right to privacy and free choice of employment

At this stage of the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID) pandemic, we are seeing the steady growth of confirmed cases, the increasing number of deaths, and the growing challenges that beset our public health system. In this context, we recognize the urgency of implementing restrictive measures to address the gravity of the situation.

However, as we have previously stressed, protecting public health entails protection of other rights as well, which are equally essential to the genuine fulfilment of the highest standard of the right to health. There are clear guidelines in ensuring balance in protecting public health while respecting human rights based on international law as well as domestic laws. Under the Siracusa Principles—a guide to government response for reasons of public health or emergency—the measures must be proportionate to the attainment of clear objectives, least intrusive and restrictive available, respectful of human dignity, among others.

Two recent pronouncements of the government—disclosure of personal information of COVID-19 cases to enhance contract tracing efforts and deployment ban of overseas healthcare workers to address shortage of healthcare personnel—are susceptible to overreach in terms of guaranteeing the right to privacy and freedom to choose gainful employment respectively.

On the disclosure of personal information, while the government clarified that this shall be done in accordance with the Data Privacy Act, clear parameters must be outlined to ensure that it will not overstep the right to privacy. We recognize the importance of contract tracing to contain the virus, but it must be done with utmost care for privacy and confidentiality.

Click the link below to read the complete story:

Statement of CHR Spokesperson, Atty. Jacqueline Ann de Guia, on recent COVID-19 measures that impact the right to privacy and free choice of employment

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[Statement] On Joshua Molo’s forced public apology -YND

The Youth for Nationalism and Democracy – (YND) Philippines strongly upholds the right of the students and the youth to freedom of speech and expression and condemns any act of intimidation and suppression of such, as what had happened in the case of a student-leader in Nueva Ecija.

Facing threat of a libel case over his Facebook post expressing his dissent on President Duterte’s lack of action to address the needs of the Filipinos amidst the Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19) in the country, University of the East (UE) Dawn’s editor-in-chief Joshua Molo was forced to make a public apology on 04 April 2020.

According to a report by Redwire, Molo’s former teachers in high school who are pro-Dutertes were offended by his social media post against the Duterte administration and reported him to the Brgy. Hall of San Fernando Sur, Cabiao, Nueva Ecija where he was coerced to be filmed apologizing and promising to never do such, again.

This incident is a clear violation of Molo’s right to freedom of speech and expression as guaranteed by the 1987 Constitution. Moreover, it is never libelous for concerned and responsible citizens of the Philippines to express their political beliefs including their criticisms on the administration’s processes and actions.

This act of political intimidation of teachers to their student who merely exercises critical thinking is a reflection of how political patronage has wreaked havoc on the democratic spaces of the youth and the students’ academic freedom where exchange and expressions of their ideas and beliefs are unconstrained by authorities.

We call on teachers and educators to encourage their students to exercise critical thinking for nation-building as the realest value of education, instead of reporting and getting offended by such practice. We also appeal the students and all concerned citizens to continue speaking up for the truth and their rights and beliefs and not be threatened by any act of harassment and intimidation so long as we do not violate any law.

Speaking the truth amidst prevalent disinformation and misinformation in the country is all the more critical. It is high time that we assert our freedom of speech and expression as the tyrannical administration relentlessly attacks its critics. No act of harassment shall mute the collective voices of empowered, nationalist, and democracy-loving students, leaders, and citizens.

#DefendFreedomOfSpeech
#UpholdFreedomOfExpression
#NoToPoliticalIntimidation
#ResistTyranny
#DefendAcademicFreedom

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[From the web] Joshua Molo, editor-in-chief of UE Dawn, the official student publication of the University of the East, was forced to apologize in public over a Facebook post criticizing negligence amid the coronavirus pandemic

𝗔𝗟𝗘𝗥𝗧: Joshua Molo, editor-in-chief of UE Dawn, the official student publication of the University of the East, was forced to apologize in public over a Facebook post criticizing the Duterte administration’s negligence amid the coronavirus pandemic.

This happened after Molo argued with his former high school teachers, who were offended by Molo’s online post.

At around 1:00 p.m. today, April 5, barangay officials of Cabiao, Nueva Ecija, escorted Molo, together with her mother, who is also an officer of their barangay.

Meanwhile, one of Molo’s former journalism teachers, namely, Jun Ainne Francisco went to their barangay hall in San Fernando Sur to ask for blotter. Molo was accused of cyber libel because he called out his teachers for making fun of his earlier post.

“Inaamin ko po na ako ay nagkamali, at hindi na muling mauulit ang pangyayari,” said Molo in his public apology posted online.

Moreover, Molo’s case is not the first recorded attack against press freedom this time of the pandemic.

On March 25, Today’s Carolinian (TC), the official student publication of the University of San Carlos, published an article condemning the order of Cebu Governor Gwendolyn Garcia against its critics for tracing individuals who will criticize the government’s actions against the COVID-19.

Garcia also commented to the article, inviting the editor-in-chief of TC, Berns Mitra, to discuss the matter, which is a clear manifestation to intimidate her critics.

Click the link below to read more:

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[From the web] DAKILA condemns the harassment of Joshua Molo, the Editor-in-Chief of the UE Dawn, for publishing his opinion about the current administration’s response in the #COVID19 pandemic

We strongly condemn the harassment of Joshua Molo, the Editor-in-Chief of the University of the East’s official publication UE Dawn, for publishing his opinion about the current administration’s response in the #COVID19 pandemic.

Earlier today, Molo was threatened by barangay officials with the filing of a libel case against him if he will not issue a public apology after he criticized the Durterte administration which offended some of his high school teachers.

We believe that this is a direct attack not only to campus journalists, media practitioners, and society’s watchdogs but also to citizen who are expressing their dissent whether online or offline.

Now more than ever, we must never be silenced for upholding our freedoms and rights. Let us continue to #HoldTheLine and #DefendPressFreedom.

#UpholdFreedomOfExpression

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[In the news] Rights groups slam Duterte’s ‘shoot to kill’ order: Prioritize lives, not violence -RAPPLER.com

Human rights group says President Rodrigo Duterte’s statement may lead to more abuses as Luzon remains in lockdown in the face of the novel coronavirus outbreak

Human rights groups on Thursday, April 2, condemned President Rodrigo Duterte’s “dangerous” shoot-to-kill order against quarantine violators amid the novel coronavirus outbreak in the Philippines.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) said that Duterte’s new threats should not be viewed as empty, considering the thousands killed under his anti-illegal drugs campaign.

“At the very least, Duterte gives the police all the justification they need to commit human rights abuses against people who may be violating these COVID19 regulations because they needed to find work or food,” Carlos Conde of HRW said in a statement.

Read complete story @www.rappler.com

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[In the news] Group gives free fast food to poor barangays under Luzon lockdown -CNN Philippines

While the government tries to contain the COVID-19 pandemic with a Luzon-wide quarantine, a group has volunteered to help provide free fast food meals to the most affected communities.

The people behind the Facebok page “Pakainin ang Buong Barangay” has partnered with Jollibee Corporation and Jollibee Foundation in a project seeking to feed residents of poor barangays who may be experiencing hunger under the lockdown.

“People have no jobs and are getting very hungry. We realize this is a drop in the bucket but we need to do something,” said Gary Ramirez, who led the initiative.

“We have come to an agreement with Jollibee Corporation and Jollibee Foundation to help out in our own little way. We agreed that Jollibee Foundation will match whatever meals we order for the barangays,” the group, with over 800 members, said in one of its posts.

Read complete story @cnnphilippines.com

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[Statement] Pagkain, tulong, proteksyon, hindi banta ng pandarahas -iDEFEND

Tuwiran nang nilantad ni Pangulong Duterte ang kawalang kakayahan ng gobyernong tugunan ang pinakamahahalagang usapin sa panahon ng pandemyang COVID19.

Sa gitna ng kagutuman at kahirapang dulot ng Luzon lockdown ang tanging sagot ni Duterte sa mamamayang kumakalam ang sikmura ay pananakot at pandarahas. Subalit higit na pinsala ang inutil at militaristang tugon ni Duterte sa hinaing ng mamamayan.

Matatandaang ito rin ang naging tugon niya sa anya’y talamak na problema sa droga. Tuloy tuloy ang EJK sa ilalim ng giyera laban sa droga. Dumagdag sa panganib na ito ang pandemyang coronavirus.

Imbes na pabilisin ang proseso at pahusayin ang pagbibigay ng ayudang pagkain o pera sa mamamayan, bibigwasan tayo ng “maghintay na lang” at may sundot pang “walang mamamatay sa gutom”.

Maari ngang wala pang namamatay sa gutom mula sa sitwasyong dulot ng COVID -19, ngunit tiyak na marami nang namatay mula sa kapabayaan ng gubyerno, tingnan na lamang ang bilang ng namatay na mga medical personnel bunga ng kawalan ng sapat na personal protective equipment o mga mamamayang namatay na sa COVID-19 na di man lang inabot ng testing.

Sa pagka insecure ni Duterte sa tibay ng suporta sa kanya ng mamamayan, sinimulan ang panggigipit sa mga lider tulad ni Mayor Vico Sotto ng Pasig, na patuloy na nagbibigay ayuda na ramdam ng kanyang mga nasasakupan. Sinimulan din ang planong pag iimbestiga kay Vice President Leni Robredo, dahil sa mababaw na dahilang nauungusan ang ehekutibo (nasyunal na pamahalaan) sa pamimigay ng serbisyo sa tao. Lalong masaklap ang BAHO Law (R.A. 11469) na naka ambang tugisin ang mga kritiko ng palpak na mga patakarang pambansa sa harap ng pandemyang COVID-19.

Sa totoo, hindi na dapat problema ang pera—ito ang unang tiniyak sa paspasang pag-apruba ng Bayanihan We Heal As One Act. Matapos ang isang linggong walang nangyari, higit na malinaw ngayon na walang konkreto at epektibong plano ang pambansang gobyerno sa kabila ng emergency powers na ipinagkaloob kay Duterte.

Nanatiling maraming mamamayan ang naiiwan sa para-paraang pag-angkop sa sitwasyong bunga ng enhanced community quarantine o lockdown. Pasakit at hindi malasakit ang sukli sa mamamayang pwersadong manatili sa kanilang mga pamayanan.

Saan ngayon aasa ang Pilipino kundi sa sarili na nyang lakas at talinong mapanlikha? Sinu sino ang magtutulungan kundi ang mga sektor at komunidad na higit na apektado ng crisis sa kalusugan at crisis sa pamahalaan? Nakanino ang kaligtasan kundi sa ating aktibong pagkilos na mismo?

Read more @idefend.ph

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[Statement] BMP condemns arrest of QC protestors

The Bukluran ng Manggagawang Pilipino condemns the arrest and dispersal of urban poor residents of Sitio San Roque, who were holding a noise barrage near their community along EDSA this morning. The residents were seeking for food and assistance from the government.

In this time of crisis, food and state assistance are just and legitimate demands. Hunger and desperation are natural consequences of the state-imposed, ill-conceived enhanced community quarantine (ECQ). This is further exacerbated by the inept and disorganized response of agencies and local government units all over the country.

Fact is, these households already belonged to the poor and near-poor economic brackets even before the COVID 19 outbreak, the administration of President Duterte should have placed these communities on the top of their priorities and should heavily consider their plight when they decided to implement the ECQ.

To arrest hungry and desperate people is a new low for this administration. Not only did they dilly-dally in addressing the crisis in late February, the government treated the health crisis as a peace and order issue and deployed security forces instead of medical practitioners.

Protests similar to what was held in San Roque today will not be an isolated case. More and more people are questioning and rising up against the violent yet impossible implementation of ECQ in urban poor communities similar to the cases of Quiapo, Taguig and elsewhere. More community actions and marches shall burst open in the days to come as Duterte and minions continue to dismiss the calls for free mass testing and fail to guarantee food rations for all families.

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[Statement] Digital rights advocates demand the repeal of Section 6 of Bayanihan to Heal as One Act

We, the undersigned, express our grave concern over a provision of Republic Act No. 11469 or the Bayanihan To Heal As One Act that threatens our constitutional rights to free expression and access to information.

Haphazardly approved on 25 March 2020, the law penalizes “fake news” or disinformation under Section 6 (f), which reads:

“Individuals or groups creating, perpetuating, or spreading false information regarding the COVID-19 crisis on social media and other platforms, such information having no valid or beneficial effect on the population, and are clearly geared to promote chaos, panic, anarchy, fear, or confusion; and those participating in cyber incidents that make use or take advantage of the current crisis situation to prey on the public through scams, phishing, fraudulent emails, or other similar acts.”

While the provision appears to address the long-standing concern of journalists and activists over false information, which is typically circulated by paid trolling, it can also be used to curtail free speech, especially pieces of information that are critical of the government. Given its specific context and current form, Section 6 can be just as detrimental to democracy and human rights.

‘False information’ is not defined in any existing law, which means that its determination is left to the whims of law enforcers. The provision does not distinguish between those who passively ‘like’, share, comment and those who deliberately generate false content or actively discuss pieces of information that are deemed false.

The COVID-19 pandemic has a historical significance, being the most infectious threat that has hit multiple countries since Ebola and SARS. In this context, sharing complete and correct information can save many lives. But the pandemic also has global and local political ramifications, which require scrutiny and vigilance. It speaks of Philippine relations to China. It puts the knowledge, skills, strategies, and authenticity of public officials to the test. Like any disaster, it shakes up systems in ways that expose the good and the bad. Good practices including consultative planning, innovative thinking, and collaborative approaches continue to shine through amidst the double standards, nepotism, corruption, censorship and red tape imposed by many government offices and public officials.

In the last two weeks alone, we have seen abuses perpetrated by public officials. In Cebu, for example, the governor made a rapper promise before the public that he would never swear at and criticize the government’s response to COVID-19 in social media. During patrols, we have seen barangay officials and police apprehend curfew violators and penalize them by exposing them under the sun for hours, placing a child in a coffin and detaining teens in a dog cage. This, on top of the Duterte administration’s military rather than a public health approach to the pandemic.

But we have also seen the positive impact of free speech and organizing over social media, particularly during the lockdown of Luzon and other places. Individuals and groups were able to pool together resources and support health and other essential workers. Public outrage exposed the unnecessary use of the limited COVID-19 testing kits by asymptomatic politicians and prevented the unfair sacking of health officials who opposed this VIP treatment. It also forced the Department of Health (DOH) to go back to the drawing board after it announced the measly allowance for volunteer health workers. It also exposed incidents of gender-based violence in certain checkpoints.

As courts are closed during the lockdown, it is unlikely that those accused of violating Section 6 will have access to legal remedies. This will further congest detention centers and eventually the dockets. More importantly, it will likely target the more critical voices, especially among those who have no political clout.

We urge the government to repeal Section 6, particularly its provision on false information and instead use its resources to generate, curate and disseminate critical pieces of information to the public and specific constituents towards addressing COVID-19 and supporting the needs of those most rendered vulnerable. We have seen creative examples of these which, when practiced more widely, can benefit more communities.

The COVID-19 pandemic is not only a crucial point to use information in saving lives. It is also a time to make people and systems work in favor of rights. Our democratic space is more crucial than ever. The damages wrought upon it by fake news prior to the pandemic can only be repaired by promoting critical discourses. Make it healthy by keeping it free.

Signatories:

Individuals:

  • Al Alegre
  • Alvin Gallardo
  • April Gomez Baldovino
  • Archill Niña F. Capistrano, BOT Chairperson of the Children’s Legal Bureau and Assistant Professor, UP Cebu
  • Dianne Olivan
  • Floyd Scott Tiogangco, writer and performance artist
  • Jhewoung Capatoy
  • Jason A. Baguia, writer and assistant professor, UP Cebu
  • Joan Dymphna Saniel-Amit, Executive Director of the Children’s Legal Bureau & Faculty Member of USC College of Law
  • John Nery, columnist, Philippine Daily Inquirer
  • Kathy del Socorro
  • Lito Averia
  • Marnie Tonson
  • Nica Dumlao
  • Niel Anthony Lajot
  • Noemi Lardizabal-Dado
  • Ryan Silverio
  • Shebana Alqaseer
  • Violeta de Guzman
  • Winthrop Yu
  • Weena Jade Gera, Vice Chancellor for Administration, UP Cebu
  • Yllang Montenegro, artist
  • Zenaida Ligan-Ashburn, Professor, UP Cebu

Organizations:

  • Active Vista
  • ASEAN SOGIE Caucus
  • Center for Migrant Advocacy, Phils. Inc.
  • Coalition Against Trafficking in Women – Asia Pacific
  • Dakila – Philippine Collective for Modern Heroism
  • Democracy.Net.PH
  • Digital Rights Coalition
  • Empowerment Through Art
  • Foundation for Media Alternatives
  • Human Rights Online – Philippines
  • In Defense of Human Rights and Dignity Movement
  • Legal Network for Truthful Elections (LENTE)
  • Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates
  • Philippine Human Rights Information Center
  • Philippine Internet Freedom Alliance
  • Sentro ng mga Nagkakaisa at Progresibong Manggagawa
  • True Colors Coalition
  • Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau

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[Announcement] Serbisyong pangkalusugan sa panahon ng COVID-19 -PMPI

Sa mga mahal po naming mga kababayan,

Ang PMPI (Philippine-Misereor Partnesrship, Inc), isang network ng mga 250 CSO (civil society organization) ay magbibigay po ng serbisyong pangkalusugan sa mga komunidad na sakop ng ating network.

Dahil sa katangian ng kinakaharap nating situwasyon, ang serbisyo po ay sa pamamagitan ng cell phone at ibang paraang online gamit ang social media (katulad ng Messenger, Facebook, Viber, o website).

Katuwang po natin sa serbisyong ito ang dalawa nating CSO – INAM Philippines (Integrative Medicine for Alternative Healthcare Systems [INAM] Philippines, Inc) at MAG (Medical Action Group, Inc).

INAM PHILIPPINES
Ang INAM Philippines po, sa pamamagitan ng ilang boluntaryong doktor at integrative medicine practitioner ay magbibigay ng direktang konsultasyon online o sa cell phone. Nasa ibaba po ang mga pangalan ng mga boluntaryo, at ng serbisyong puede nilang ibigay, iskedyul ng konsultasyon, at paraan ng pagkontak sa kanila.

May ilang datos lang po na hihingin ang mga boluntaryong manggagamot para sa ating rekord. Dito po ay hinihingi na namin ang inyong pahintulot na maisama ang mga datos ninyo sa aming rekord (Ito po ay bilang pagsunod sa ating Data Privacy Law). Wala naman pong problema kung hindi kayo magbigay ng datos (o ilang datos) kung hindi kayo sang-ayong magbigay. Patuloy pa rin po kayong pagsisilbihan ng mga boluntaryong manggagamot. Ang ilan pong mga datos ay gagamitin para sa statistics (o sa pagbibilang ng mga pasyente, edad nila, diagnosis, at iba pa) sa ating dokumentasyon at report.

ITO PO ANG MGA DATOS PARA SA ATING DOKUMENTASYON:

1. Pangalan ng pasyente

2. Edad

3. Kasarian

4. Tirahan [hindi po eksakto, puede na po ang bayan o distrito; halimbawa Taytay o Tondo)

5. Kontak (cell phone o email address; mahalaga po para sa follow-up)

6. Paano nalaman ang ating serbisyo (PMPI, organisasyon ninyo, Facebook, kaibigan, kapitbahay, o iba pa)

7. Diagnosis (manggagamot po ang magtutukoy, ayon sa kanyang pagsusuri)

8. Action (manggagamot din po ang magdedetermina; halimbawa po ay counselling, payo, reseta, referral, o iba pa) Mananatili pong kumpidensiyal ang mga datos; hindi tutukuyin ang inyong pangalan o anumang pagkakakilanlan sa anumang report.

MAG
Ang MAG ay nagbibigay din po ng serbisyo ng kanilang mga volunteer na doctor, psychologist, psychiatrist, neurologist, internist, pediatrician, at iba pang espesyalistang doktor.

Kontakin po si DR AMY NG-ABCEDE kung nais ninyong magpakonsulta.
CP: 09982369934; 09658907715
Website: https://www.facebook.com/medicalactiongroup

PMPI
Ang PMPI po ay may mga boluntaryo rin, na karamihan ay mga psychosocial counsellor (nagbibigay ng payo sa inyong mga alalahanin). Katulad po ng sa INAM (sa itaas) ang pagtrato natin sa mga datos. Nasa ibaba rin po ang lista ng mga boluntaryo ng PMPI, at ng serbisyong pwede nilang ibigay, iskedyul ng konsultasyon, at paraan ng pagkontak sa kanila.

Sana po ay mapangibabawan natin ang COVID sa lalong madaling panahon. Patuloy po nating payo sa ating lahat ang physical distancing (1 dipa ang layo sa ibang tao), handwashing, disinfection ng mga doorknob at ibang parating hinahawakan, at pagpapalakas ng resistensiya (8 oras na tulog, libangan, masustansiyang pagkain).

May mga detalyado rin pong impormasyon na inihanda ang INAM Philippines tungkol sa pag-iingat sa COVID-19. Ipagtanong po sa inyong samahan o bumisita sa facebook ng INAM: Integratib Medisin.

Mag-ingat po tayong lahat tuwina.

Padayon!

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Watch now! iDEFEND LIVE STREAMING – KKB sa gitna ng #COVID

KKB sa gitna ng #COVID… Kanya-Kanyang Balak 0 KASAHANG KOMUNIDAD AT BAYANIHAN
DATE: April 1, Wednesday , 4:00 PM

Makipagtalakayan sa iDEFEND LIVE STREAM sa YOUTUBE Kasama sina:
Ka Rene Magtubo, Partido Mangagawa (PM), Konsehal, Marikina
Fr. Flavie Villanueva, Kalinga Center
Ms. Jean Enriquez, CATW-AP

Rose Trajano/Egay Cabalitan (Moderators/Livestream administrators)

Manuod ng LIVESTREAM, Iclick ang links
https://idefend.ph/live0401

https://www.facebook.com/events/822168521618966

Pls support! I-copy at paste po ang buong text at ishare.ang post na ito sa inyong wall. Salamat.

 

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[Statement] NAGKAISA! Condemns Violence, Abuse, Discrimination Against Health Workers

The NAGKAISA! Labor Coalition condemns the violence, abuse, and discrimination against our fellow workers, in particular the health workers in this fight against the Coronavirus 2019 (COVID 19).

NAGKAISA!, the biggest labor alliance in the country, holds that discrimination, abuse or violence against workers who have risked their lives to save others is not only lamentable but highly deplorable or condemnable to the highest degree.

Among the recently reported acts of violence, abuse, and discrimination of Health Workers were, among others:

1. A male nurse in a privately owned hospital based in Cebu City was reportedly splashed with chlorine by two men on board a motorcycle while he walking along Tres De Abril Street in Cebu City on Friday evening, March 27, 2020(CDN 3/29/20)

2. A utility staff member of St. Louis Hospital in Tacurong, Sultan Kudarat, was harassed and splashed with bleach solution. (DOH, ABS-CBN 11:11pm 3/29/20)

3. Hospital security guards and nurses in Bataan were evicted from their rented houses because their owners feared that they would be infected by these health workers. (DZMM 7am news, 3/29/20).

4. A Nurse of a private hospital was splattered by bleach all over his face while he was on his way to report for duty in Tacurong, SK (MB 3/29/20).

5. Physicians, nurses, medical technologists, and other health workers have been expelled from their dormitories or were even being looked upon with disdain like they were carriers of the coronavirus themselves in Baguio City (MB 3/25/20).

6. Several homeowners, belonging to a subdivision in Bogo City, were planning to draft a petition that would seek to bar hospital workers from entering their properties. (CDN 3/29/20).

7. Health workers were also refused service in eateries, denied rides in public transport and asked to leave their apartments. (PDI 3/31/20).

NAGKAISA is one with the Department of Health (DOH) and other women and men of goodwill in condemning these cases of discrimination, abuse or harassment of health care workers. Once more, these acts of abuse and harassment are unacceptable!

NAGKAISA! strongly protests and demands that the situation be corrected as soon as possible by the authorities to investigate these incidences and penalize the culprits or responsible persons who committed these deplorable acts as these are not an ordinary breach of law but violations of human rights.

NAGKAISA! recognizes that health workers have the right to live in freedom and safety and the right to live life without discrimination while performing their jobs. These are among the rights recognized in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Violence, abuse or discrimination towards health workers or persons who may have come in contact with, as well as health practitioners helping patients is a breach of human rights.

NAGKAISA! views these incidents as unfair and unfortunate and one way to avoid these being repeated is for LGUs to secure their safety. Alternatively, health workers must be provided temporary living quarters at their place of work or nearby.

As of Monday, the Philippines has a total of 1546 COVID-19 cases, with 78 fatalities and 42 recoveries.

Twelve Filipino doctors have sacrificed their lives against this COVID-19 pandemic.

NAGKAISA! supports our physicians, nurses, medical technologists, security guards, utility personnel and other health workers in the frontline. They need society’s protection when they are at home, in transit to and from the hospital, or wherever they are now!

Though our workers have the right to refuse to work in a dangerous and hazardous situation, NAGKAISA! is deeply grateful for the volunteerism of the health workers who risk their lives and limbs in the frontlines.

NAGKAISA! salutes our health workers for their bravery and volunteerism in the frontlines. They are fighting to mitigate and prevent the spread of coronavirus 2019.

They are fighting for you and me.

NAGKAISA! LABOR COALITION

Atty. Sonny Matula
Chairperson
Cp 09178079041

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[In the news] San Carlos bishop seeks release of political prisoners amid pandemic -INQUIRER.net

BACOLOD CITY — San Carlos Bishop Gerardo Alminaza has asked the release of political prisoners to decongest the jails in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Alminaza pointed out in a statement released on Saturday, March 28, the looming possibility that coronavirus would hit the highly congested jail facilities in the country.

“We must muster courage to address the glaringly high-risk of a COVID-19 outbreak, now forced upon those behind bars,” he said.

To help decongest the jails, he said the more than 600 political prisoners in the country should be prioritized for release as they had been detained on “questionable and dubious charges.”

Click the link below to read full story:

San Carlos bishop seeks release of political prisoners amid pandemic

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[In the news] After bleach thrown at personnel’s face, Sultan Kudarat hospital condemns discrimination -RAPPLER.com

The St. Louis Hospital utility worker was passing by the public market when he was attacked by 5 individuals

St. Louis Hospital in Tacurong City, Sultan Kudarat condemned the harassment experienced by one of its utility workers on Friday, March 27. (Editor’s note: We previously identified the hospital personnel as a nurse. We apologize for the error.)

According to the hospital’s Facebook post, the utility worker was passing by the public market when he was attacked by 5 individuals.

“Outnumbered and alone, he was helpless as these vile individuals splattered Zonrox (bleach) all over his face,” the statement said, adding that the crime could have resulted in irreparable and permanent damage to his sight.

Fortunately, the utility worker immediately headed to the hospital and was given prompt treatment. The case was then reported to the President Quirino Police Station.

Read full story @www.rappler.com

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[Off-the-shelf] Physical, emotional and digital protection while using home as office in times of COVID-19 -Front Line Defenders

Ideas & tips for human rights defenders

A global pandemic is a new situation for all of us. Most of us already are or soon may be forced to start working remotely. Many will use their home as an office. In some places, there is no doubt this crisis will be abused to further repress human rights defenders (HRDs) and human rights organisations (HROs) like many other crisis situations have been used in the past. Physical and emotional environments are also very different for each of us.

However, Front Line Defenders has experience advising HRDs working remotely and part of its own team has been working remotely – and securely – for years. Below is some of our thinking and learning around the challenges of this modality of work. It is hard to put down one size fits all solutions, especially for physical and emotional protection. This is offered as inspiration to evaluate and improve protection of your particular situation. And if you are a HRD or HRO at risk in your country, you may always reach out to Front Line Defenders for help – the organisation is at work and fully operational during this time.

We encourage you to communicate clearly and promptly with your donors and partners regarding your particular situation. Donors in the human rights space are highly sensitive to the difficulties this crisis is posing to its partners and grantees, even as they face a variety of unprecedented challenges. We believe it makes situation much more manageable if they know what is possible and impossible at this moment for you and your organisation regarding your work or cooperation with them. They also may be able to help you with your specific needs right now, things like portable equipment to work from home or additional at-home security measures.

Read full story @www.frontlinedefenders.org

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[In the news] LGBT group sa Tabaco City lumikha ng 800 masks para sa COVID-19 frontliners -ABS-CBN news

Umabot sa 800 face masks ang nagawa ng grupong Tabak Sangre para sa mga health workers ng lungsod.

Ayon sa presidente ng Tabak Sangre na si Phem Baliwag, ito ang kanilang paraan para makapag-ambag sa pagpuksa sa pagkalat ng COVID-19.

Noong Miyerkoles ng gabi, nagtungo ang grupo sa ilang ospital sa lungsod para personal na mamigay ng face mask.

Sa ngayon, may mga nagdo-donate na daw sa kanila ng tela at garter na gamit sa paggawa ng face masks.

Read full story @news.abs-cbn.com

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[In the news] After backlash, DOH studying increase in health workers pay -RAPPLER.com

‘Humihingi rin po kami ng tawad kung ang impresyon na naibigay ng P500 daily allowance ay ganito lamang ang halaga na ibinigay natin sa ating health care workers. Hindi po ito mas lalayo pa sa katotohanan,’ says DOH

After backlash on their offer to pay P500 a day to volunteer health care workers, the Department of Health (DOH) said on Saturday, March 28, that it is now studying its supplemental budget to increase the compensation.

“Ngayon pong nabigyan na po tayo ng supplemental budget ng Kongreso, amin na pong inaayos ang paghahati ng pera para mapaglaanan natin ang mga importanteng bagay tulad ng compensation para sa ating health care workers,” said Health Undersecretary Maria Rosario Vergeire.

(Now that the Congress has given us a supplemental budget, we will be sorting out the allocation of our budget to fund important things like compensation for our health care workers.)

The DOH called out for volunteer health care workers to ensure sufficient staffing, as it implements an every 2 weeks policy for its current manpower. Health care workers would work for 2 weeks but they would have to be put on quarantine after, also for two weeks, and so on.

The DOH said it would pay volunteers P500 a day, which drew flak from the public for being too low an amount, and not commensurate to the risk they faced doing the job.

The current daily minimum wage in Metro Manila for the non-agricultural sector, which includes health workers, is P537.

Read full story @www.rappler.com

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[From the web] De Lima on mass testing for COVID-19: What is taking us so long?

DOJ Sec. Leila De Lima File photo: pinoymagazine.com

Opposition Senator Leila M. de Lima slams health authorities for delaying the implementation of national testing for COVID-19 even after admitting that they are in possession of thousands of test kits, both purchased and received from foreign donors.

De Lima also joins the calls of several groups and personalities who are petitioning the government to immediately start mass testing in highly-populated areas, especially to cities or municipalities with widespread poverty and vulnerable societies.

“Ilan pa ba sa ating mga kababayan – mga health workers, frontliners, PUIs, PUMs, at mamamayang bulnerable, gaya ng mga matatanda at may malulubhang karamdaman – ang mamamatay na lamang bago pa matiyak na may COVID-19 sila at mabigyan ng karampatang gamutan?” she asks.

“Kailan pa natin masisiguro ang kaligtasan ng lahat mula sa posibleng pagkakahawa sa mga hindi nagpapakita ng sintomas, ngunit nagdadala ng virus? Kailan pa ba natin balak kumilos, kapag madami na ang namatay?” she added.

Scientists, health groups, youth organizations, politicians and prominent personalities, among others, have raised concerns on why the Department of Health (DOH) has repeatedly downplayed the importance of widespread testing.

Even the World Health Organization have repeatedly urged countries to “test, test, test”, emphasizing the need of a clearer picture of the extent of the pandemic in the country for a more focused response to mitigate the virus’ effects.

The health department also claimed that they are still waiting for the accreditation of more laboratories capable of testing multiple samples at a time, across the country.

“Day by day, we learn that the total no. of confirmed cases reportedly increases, yet we cannot be certain of the accuracy of these figures. Even DOH Secretary Duque admitted that they could be missing half of the actual totality of COVID-19 cases in the country,” De Lima said.

“It’s as if you are trying to conceal the real numbers – the question is why? To lessen the panic, or to feed your bruised ego?”, she added.

As of March 26, official numbers indicate that there are 707 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the Philippines, with 45 fatalities. However, experts believe that the estimates are not consistent with global data due to the limited number of tests conducted in the country.

Despite having announced that almost 7,000 persons are considered as PUIs (Persons under Investigation) and PUMs (Persons under Monitoring), the DOH have only conducted less than 2,000 tests.

“What is taking us so long? Figuring out how to conduct mass testing for its citizens should be high on the government’s priority list if we are to make it through this pandemic,” the lady Senator from Bicol said.

“The sooner we identify who are afflicted with this virus, the sooner we can isolate them and get them treated. Conversely, the more we wait the more resources we waste. The more resources we waste, the more people will be infected and inevitably die from this pandemic,” she added.

To address the gap, De Lima recommended that both the national government and local government units (LGU) should divide the responsibility of mass testing, indicating that most local officials are capable and willing to shoulder the burden.

“The local government can do preliminary testing while the national government reserves the right to undertake final confirmatory tests. In doing so, the whole of government will be able to perform their duties in harmony,” she said.

“I strongly urge the DOH to strongly consider issuing temporary accreditation credentials and grant them limited testing capabilities. This will not only decongest other accredited laboratories to screen tests but will speed up the release of results and cover the bigger population waiting to get tested,” she added.

After the announcement of the lockdown, initially in the National Capital Region and later the whole island of Luzon, citizens have observed that local officials outshined their national counterparts in implementing measures to limit the spread of the virus.

The DOH also received backlash after reports exposed that high-ranking government officials who requested for COVID-19 testing were granted preferential treatment, while other patients with much severe symptoms, were left for weeks on a waiting list.

De Lima on mass testing for COVID-19: What is taking us so long?

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[From the web] I was COVID-19 Patient No. 4 -GMAnews

I was COVID-19 Patient No. 4

“The only way to battle this is through faith and belief that you will be better.”

Ito ang mensahe ni Atty. Carlo Navarro, isang COVID-19 survivor.

Siya si Patient number 4, ang kauna-unahang Pilipino na nagkaroon ng COVID-19 sa Pilipinas. Ngayong patuloy ang kanyang paggaling, ibinahagi niya ang kanyang mga karanasan sa paglaban sa sakit. Panoorin ang video na ito.

FULL STORY: https://bit.ly/39h1ca2

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