Tag Archives: Commission on Human Rights (Philippines)

WATCH Now! Live Stream – Nandito Kami! CoViD19 PH: Commission on #HumanRights and Civil Society Organization response

Nandito Kami! CoViD19 PH: Commission on #HumanRights and Civil Society Organization response

Kasama Sina:
Karen Gomez Dumpit
Commissioner,
Commission on Human Rights

Atty. Jacqueline Anne De Guia
Executive Director,
Commission on Human Rights

Jaybee Garganera
Alyansa Tigil Mina
Steering Committee Member, iDEFEND

Tagapagpadaloy:
Rose Trajano
Secretary General
Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates

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COVID-19 Human Rights Violation Reporting
https://idefend.ph/covid19-hrv-reporting

Websites

iDEFEND
https://idefend.ph/

PAHRA
https://philippinehumanrights.org/

Social Media

iDEFEND
https://www.facebook.com/iDEFENDofficial

PAHRA
https://facebook.com/philippinehumanrights.org

iDEFEND

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[Statement] PAHRA to the 5th Commission on Human Rights: have a firm grasp and sharp analysis of the human rights situation of the country

PAHRA to the 5th Commission on Human Rights: have a firm grasp and sharp analysis of the human rights situation of the country
June 19, 2015

This will serve as solid bases for the 5th CHR to map out your plan for the whole of your term as well as for your annual planning. There will always be a need for flexibility for unexpected incidents of human rights concerns that demand immediate responses.

pahra logo copy

This first challenge includes a comprehensive assessment of what has been done by the 4th Commission and learn from lessons both positive and negative. Such action would be a precedent that should be made a tradition along with other duty-bearers reporting to their claimholders.

Broad, participative and transparent consultations are key to obtain to true and reliable information and data.

REVIEW AND STRENGTHEN OUR NHRI’S STRUCTURES, BOTH ON THE NATIONAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS FOR MORE APPROPRIATE, TIMELY AND EFFECTIVE RESPONSES TO SITUATIONS OF HR CONCERNS.

This is to finally overcome “bureaucratic inertia”, as well as eradicate the culture of patronage and retribution now embedded within the relationships between officers and the rank and file, and even between regular and co-terminus employees.

As 5th Commission you are inheriting an institutional legacy of the 4th Commission marked with a relatively widespread demoralization and discontent among personnel brought about by the unprecedented protest of more than a hundred officers and staff against a promotion of a person with questionable eligibility and done with “indecent haste”.

As the new Commission you have to resolve the issue of the Executive Director and his consequent actions objectively and with fairness to all. Doing so otherwise may affect the integrity and credibility of both the 5th Commission and the CHRP as institution.

There is need to revitalize the prime institution of human rights with appropriately-capacitated and committed personnel adhering above all to accepted HR principles and standards. Promotion should be based on merit and dedication to the promotion and protection of human rights.

INSTITUTIONALIZE CHRP-CSO RELATIONSHIP

After a presentation of the CHR’s Road Map in 2010 which included civil society human rights defenders participation in the NHRI’s planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, a tenet in the Paris Principles, i.e., Section (g), that deal with the importance of national institutions establishing and maintaining close relations with Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and Non- Government Organizations

(NGOs) working in the field of human rights, the Media and Civil Society Relations Office (MCSRO) directly under the Office of the Chairperson was established. For the whole term of the 4th Commission it was non-functional. The office and the intent withered away.

There is urgent need to institutionalize CHR-CSO relationship so as to converge personnel, capabilities, resources and efforts to break through impunity and advance human rights. Furthermore, the deputization or deputation of CSO-HRDs is long awaiting final approval.

The ARMM Regional Human Rights Commission (RHRC) has moved ahead when it institutionalize its relationship with the Bangsamoro civil society human rights defenders. The newly formed NHRI of Mongolia has in its brochure its own institutionalized structure with their civil society.

The Commissioners of the 5th Commission will find all the ingredients at their disposal not only to catch up if used judiciously, but also to move ahead.

CONDUCT A THOROUGH AND SUSTAINED MONITORING OF STATE COMPLIANCE OF ITS OBLIGATIONS TO ENABLE TIMELY INTERVENTIONS.

A broadening participative process is being presently achieved in making both joint (government, CHR, CSOs) and independent or alternative Universal Periodic Review reports and even in the submitted reports to the eight international human rights treaties to which the Philippines is a State Party.

The 5th Commission need to monitor priority human rights issues or situations which have long been the environ for the culture of impunity. The land issue is one. Many extra-judicial killings, enforced disappearances and torture ensued from land conflicts. The CHR had no thorough and sustained monitoring of the obligations of the State in fulfilling the land rights of thousands of peasants as contained in CARP and later in CARPER.

A thorough and sustained monitoring with timely intervention in highly volatile areas where extractive industries intrude into indigenous peoples’ ancestral lands and domains could prevent impunity. People or community rights-based monitoring mechanisms can be jointly set up by CHR, CSOs and local government units together with the security forces. These local monitoring mechanisms (LMMs) can supplement one of the main tasks of an NHRI.

PAHRA as claimholders are only too willing to converge their commitment to dignity and human rights with that of the members of the 5th Commission and of the NHRI’s officers and staff to end impunity and advance a culture of human rights.
Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA)
53-B Maliksi St. Bgy. Pinyahan
Quezon City, Philippines (1100)
Tel/fax (632) 436-26-33
Mobile : 0906-553-1792
E-mail: pahra@philippinehumanrights.org
Fb account: philippinehumanrights
Website: http://www.philippinehumanrights.org
Twitter : @PAHRAhr
Skype : pahra1986

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[People] CHR’s Personnel Arising Against “Midnight” Appointment of Executive Director by Commissioners Rosales, Cardona and Dela Cruz -by Max De Mesa

Commission on Human Rights’ Personnel Arising Against “Midnight” Appointment of Executive Director by Commissioners Rosales, Cardona and Dela Cruz
April 25, 2015

The arising of more than 100 personnel to register their strong protest against an appointment to the institution’s adjudged as done in “indecent haste” augers well for a renewal of good governance in our Commission on Human Rights (CHR). It is indeed a welcome refreshing wind of unprecedented change to demand from the CHR Commissioners its rights-based obligations as duty bearers in governance, i.e., participation, transparency and accountability. It vindicates quiet deep sensitivity for fairness of the many hard-working and faithful personnel in the CHR.

The first-of-its-kind petition forged and signed by CHR Directors, Officers-in-Charge (OICs) and rank-and-file employees from the national and regional offices disputes the eligibility and procedures assented to and conducted by Chairperson Etta Rosales, Commissioners Ma.Victoria Cardona and Norberto dela Cruz to appoint Atty. Marc Titus B. Cebreros as CHR Executive Director (ED). Commissioner Jose Manuel Mamauag dissented and preferred to leave the appointing of the ED, out of delicadeza, to the next Commission. The petition has been submitted to the currently sitting en banc Commission.

The Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA) strongly decry this “midnight” appointment last April 13, 2015 while the Commission term ends on May 5, 2015. It deliberately sets aside the rules of promotion stated in the provisions of the Civil Service Commission (CSC) and in the CHR’s own all-personnel-approved Merit Selection Plan (MSP). After studying judiciously the data and documents related to the said appointment, PAHRA stands in solidarity with the findings and protest petition of the CHR personnel.

Furthermore, PAHRA demands the immediate removal of Chairperson Etta Rosales, Commissioners Ma. Victoria Cardona and Norberto dela Cruz for grave abuse of discretion.

The three CHR officials have tailor-fitted requirements and procedures for one who seems to be a pre-favored candidate for ED, Atty. Cebreros.

A janitress applicant required to undergo a neuro-psychological examination to clean the Chairperson’s office, but examinations needed for eligibility as ED, the top career position in the Commission to oversee the work and operations of the national office and 13 regional offices, are all set aside. The Civil Service Commission (CSC) advised that it should take at least a month to screen applicants/candidates for managerial positions but the vetting process were manipulatedly short-cutted by the 3 CHR officials to fast-track in four (4) working days said process of appointment.

What alarms PAHRA the most, if not acted upon by the appropriate authorities, is that this grave abuse of discretion may become a justifiable precedent action and a new acceptable standard for Commissioners and personnel of CHR. Much less should it be implanted and perpetuated in the institution.

Whether this grave abuse of discretion has been done near the end or at any period of any Commissioner’s term, it merits the same disciplinary action. It goes against the common Paris Principles for NHRIs in the areas of transparency, accountability and rule of law.

This is unacceptable. This should stop now.

No to “midnight” appointment. Stop grave abuse of discretion.
Justice and dignity for us all,
Max M. de Mesa
Chairperson, PAHRA

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[In the news] ‘Soldiers shot botanist, companions after thinking they were communist rebels’ -InterAksyon.com

‘Soldiers shot botanist, companions after thinking they were communist rebels’
By Abigail C. Kwok, InterAksyon.com
December 18, 2012

InterAksyon logo2The Commission on Human Rights (CHR) said soldiers mistook botanist Leonard Co and his companions as communist rebels when they fired at Co’s group two years ago in Kananga, Leyte.

Although the Army operation was was “legitimate,” the supposed encounter was not, CHR chairperson Etta Rosales said in a phone interview.

“There was no legitimate encounter because the military failed to see the difference between the combatants and non-combatants. These were civilians and soldiers mistook them to be combatants. They shot at these people. That is a violation of the International Humanitarian Law (IHL),” Rosales said.

Read full article @ www.interaksyon.com

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[From the web] The right to live a life of human dignity (CHR on RH Bill) – www.chr.gov.ph

13 May 2011
THE RIGHT TO LIVE A LIFE OF HUMAN DIGNITY

Good afternoon.

The past few weeks made us witnesses to impassioned debates surrounding the Reproductive Health Bill, with one side of the bench labeling itself as pro-choice and the other, pro-life. Controversial social legislations such as this generate heated public attention and for good reason – it opens up a democratic space for the public to participate in the creative process of legislation. Unfortunately, the cacophony of opposing positions and disparate opinions seems to have drowned out focus on what the issue is really about: THE RIGHT TO LIVE A LIFE OF HUMAN DIGNITY.

More than morality and anti-poverty, Reproductive Health is foremost about Human Rights. Reproductive Health is about the right of every person – regardless of sex, gender, age, social status, political or religious conviction – to the highest attainable standard of health. It is about the right of the woman to know how to take care of herself, take full control of her body and make life-changing decisions. It is about the right of everyone to information and the right to an informed choice on whether or not one wants to bring a new life into the world. It is about the right of the woman, the man and the child to live a life free from threats of diseases, hunger and want. It other words, Reproductive Health is about every single person having a shot at a life worthy of a human being. All these are human rights which the government of the Philippines is obligated to respect, protect, fulfill and promote under our Constitution and the various international treaties we signed and ratified.

The Commission on Human Rights, as the Gender Ombud under R.A. 9710 or the Magna Carta of Women, shall issue a comprehensive advisory on Reproductive Health in the next few days. In the meantime, may we enjoin the public to be guided by reason and not be overwhelmed by inordinate passion. After all, we are actually on the same side when we say that we are anti-abortion, anti-corruption, anti-poverty, pro-life and pro-choice.

LORETTA ANN P. ROSALES
Chairperson
Commission on Human Rights

[From the web] 4th Year of Jonas’ Abduction -freejonasburgosmovement.blogspot.com

Please join us in a gathering tomorrow, 28 April, 3 pm at the Bantayog ng mga Bayani Grounds as we mark the 4th year of the Jonas Burgos’ abduction. Allow us to thank you for your continued support and help us remind the government that we shall continue the search until my Jonas and other disappeared are returned to us.

EDITA BURGOS

[In the news] Jonas Burgos’ mother to Maj. Harry Baliaga Jr.: Name the mastermind behind my son’s abduction – Interaksyon.com

Jonas Burgos’ mother to Maj. Harry Baliaga Jr.: Name the mastermind behind my son’s abduction – Interaksyon.com.

On the fourth anniversary of the abduction of activist-farmer Jonas Burgos, a political crime that sparked protests and inquiries around the world, his mother Edita wrote an Army officer with one simple request: name the one who gave the orders to seize her son.

Mrs. Burgos, who has appeared before justice and human-rights panels in the US Congress, in Europe and in countless legal forums in the Philippines, released the contents of her open letter to the Philippine media, in hopes it would spur some soul-searching in Army Major Harry Baliaga Jr., the first uniformed officer tagged in a Commission on Human Rights report as being a direct participant in the brazen abduction, on April 28, 2007 in a Quezon City mall where Jonas, middle son of the late world press-freedom icon Joe Burgos Jr., was taking his lunch.

Read full article @ Interaksyon.com (Link above)

Revillame treatment of dancing boy in tears criminal–CHR – INQUIRER.net, Philippine News for Filipinos

Revillame treatment of dancing boy in tears criminal–CHR – INQUIRER.net, Philippine News for Filipinos.

Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 04:40:00 03/30/2011

Filed Under: Entertainment (general), Television, child abuse, Human Rights, Crime

MANILA, Philippines—What the show “Willing Willie” did to Jan-Jan Suan, the 6-year-old boy who was told to simulate a striptease while in tears in exchange for cash in front of a cheering studio audience, was criminal, the Commission on Human Rights (CHR) said Tuesday.

The CHR said it would investigate the episode as it appeared to have violated a law protecting children.

“The commission will investigate this incident in order to identify the person/s liable and to recommend proper legal actions against them,” it said in a statement.

The statement was signed by CHR Chair Loretta Ann Rosales and Commissioner Ma. Victoria Cardona, who is in charge of children’s issues.

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