Tag Archives: Catholic

[In the news] Priests recount death threats -PhilStar.com

Priests recount death threats

Three priests who have received death threats allegedly for their criticism of the Duterte administration’s war on drugs declared that they are not scared.

Fathers Robert Reyes, Flavie Villanueva and Albert Alejo yesterday went public and said that they have been receiving death threats and even monitored suspicious men lurking near their houses and offices.
“We took a stand to speak out and say, Digong, we’re not afraid of you… we only abide by our lord God,” Reyes said in Filipino.

Reyes, a vocal critic of the administration, was the most daring in his words, directly addressing President Duterte in his message.

Reyes said the threats, insults and curses all stemmed from the President’s sharp tongue against the Catholic Church.

Read full article @www.philstar.com

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[In the news] More priests bare death threats under Duterte’s watch -RAPPLER.com

More priests bare death threats under Duterte’s watch

More Catholic priests came out on Monday, March 11, to expose death threats against them under the watch of President Rodrigo Duterte.

Fathers Flavie Villanueva, Robert Reyes, and Albert Alejo appeared in a press conference at the Saint Vincent School of Theology in Tandang Sora, Quezon City, to report death threats they have recently received.

In the press conference, the priests showed copies of text messages they have received, cursing at them, Lingayen-Dagupan Archbishop Socrates Villegas, and Caloocan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David.

Read full article @www.rappler.com

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Include your full name, e-mail address and contact number.

All submissions are republished and redistributed in the same way that it was originally published online and sent to us. We may edit submission in a way that does not alter or change the original material.

Human Rights Online Philippines does not hold copyright over these materials. Author/s and original source/s of information are retained including the URL contained within the tagline and byline of the articles, news information, photos etc.

[In the news] UN: Not passing RH bill will reverse devt gains -InterAksyon.com

UN: Not passing RH bill will reverse devt gains
By Jason Gutierrez, Agence France-Presse |Chichi Conde, InterAksyon.com
August 5, 2012

MANILA, Philippines — (UPDATE – 3:39 p.m.) The United Nations warned Sunday that failure to pass a controversial birth control law in the Philippines could reverse gains in development goals amid stiff opposition from the powerful Catholic church.

The bill seeks to make it mandatory for the government to provide free contraceptives in a country where more than 80 percent of the population is Catholic and which has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in Southeast Asia.

Ugochi Daniels, country representative from the UN Population Fund, said she remained “cautiously optimistic” that President Benigno Aquino III‘s allies who dominate the House of Representatives could muster the numbers to pass the bill on Tuesday after 14 years of often divisive debate.

“What is important now is to highlight the urgency of the bill,” Daniels said.

The UN, in a separate statement, said the Philippines was unlikely to achieve its millennium development goal of reducing maternal deaths by three quarters and providing universal access to reproductive health by 2015

Read full article @ www.interaksyon.com

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[From the web] Access and citizen power -INQUIRER.net

Access and citizen power
By Rina Jimenez-David, Philippine Daily Inquirer
February 9, 2012

Anyone who posts anything on the Internet should be aware that he or she is releasing it to the whole world—or at least the “wired” world. Which is why when I heard that mothers of young Filipinas who were engaging in cyber-sex over the Internet justified their daughters’ activities by saying that “at least our daughters are not touched,” I was appalled and amused. Sure, the clients couldn’t put their hands on their daughters’ nubile bodies, but were they aware that their daughters’ faces and identities could be accessed by anyone with a computer or similar device, and that their “naughty” activities would be recorded for all eternity? (Or at least for as long as the Internet is in existence.)

Like with most anything in this world, the Internet has both an upside and a downside. Cyber-sex and all other forms of nefarious activities flourishing on the web (along with the death of privacy) may be a downside. But an upside is that persons who previously, because of their humble circumstances, were voiceless and faceless could, through accessing the Internet, gain a worldwide audience.

I recently attended a round-table discussion on “IT, Gender and Citizenship” where the results of a project involving urban poor community leaders were shared. Under the project, the leaders, many of them women, underwent training on writing news and features, and afterwards were fielded to “report” on events in their neighborhoods or on the views of their neighbors. Their stories were uploaded on an e-magazine titled “Boses ng Komunidad (Voices of the Community)” contained in the website of Likhaan, an NGO engaged in both service provision and advocacy on reproductive health issues.

Read full article @ opinion.inquirer.net

[In the news] Pope urges ‘profound renewal’ in Catholic hierarchy to combat child abuse -InterAksyon.com

Pope urges ‘profound renewal’ in Catholic hierarchy to combat child abuse
Dario Thuburn, Agence France-Presse
February 7, 2012

VATICAN CITYPope Benedict XVI urged “profound renewal” on every level of the Catholic Church to prevent child abuse, as a top cardinal conceded that canon law was not enough to deal with pedophilia.

“Healing for victims must be of paramount concern in the Christian community, and it must go hand in hand with a profound renewal of the Church at every level,” the pope said in a statement released by the Vatican.

In his message to the 200 bishops, cardinals and academic experts taking part in the Vatican’s first-ever conference on the issue, the pope also called for “a vigorous culture of effective safeguarding and victim support.”

Catholic leaders from 100 countries were taking part in the closed-door four-day meeting, as well as the Vatican’s anti-abuse prosecutor, Archbishop Charles Scicluna, and just one abuse victim, Ireland’s Marie Collins.

Read full article @ www.interaksyon.com

[Event] Training on the Immorality of Debt – FCAID

The Faith-based Against Immoral Debts (FCAID) is a three-year old network of faith-based groups and individuals who envisions a debt burden-free society. Currently, it is on its second phase with the project, “Walking with the Poor: the faith-based sector as a voice of the voiceless for the country’s liberation from immoral debts.”

Debt is an issue that has been the root cause of worsening poverty and as a result brings about crises. For some, debt should be left within the realm of economic planners and managers. However for FCAID, debt is not simply a question of economics but more so an ethical and moral one. Therefore, debt is within the realm of the faith-based to address. It talks about not only forgiveness and charity but justice. Dependence on borrowings can impede a nation’s well-being and spiritual life.

In fact, it is an issue recognized in the Old Testament of the Holy Bible. Debt in Scripture is mentioned mostly in contexts where the poor get indebted and are rendered vulnerable to lender abuse. It is assumed that there will always be poor in the land who, because of various misfortunes, are driven to seek relief in loans, subjecting them to exploitation and eventually, in extreme cases, slavery.

Debt as a priority of the faith-based community has taken a backseat for quite sometime now despite its importance. If the community is really serious about addressing poverty, then it is time to answer the hard questions, choose to side with the people and not maintain the status quo. Respond to the root cause of the problem, understand the issue, speak and advocate about the debt. As a network, we believe that the influential voice of the faith-based community is needed more than ever to amplify the voice of the poor, marginalized and affected communities, provide an alternative faith-based analysis and speak-up on the issue.

With that belief, the network developed a training module on the Immorality of Debt and used it for developing possible advocates.

However, we need more advocates who are willing to spend time and effort in working on the campaign and convincing others to join the cause so that the community can be a formidable voice on the issue.

The concept of immoral debts was specifically developed for the faith-based community to understand the relationship between debt and the possible harm it can do to people once governments become dependent on it.

For this specific training, we invite individuals who preferably came from the faith-based community, both the Catholic and Evangelical/Protestant, but also including leaders from indigenous peoples community to share on indigenous spirituality (i.e. catechists, JPIC and/or Social Action coordinators, Religion and/or Theology professors, Sunday school teachers, lay/parish leaders, religious/diocesan priests, nuns, pastors, Catholic school student council leaders, IP leaders). However, we are also inviting those who have experiences and are involved in social movements such as CSO advocates, which is one of the additional criteria. We also need participants who can represent his/her organization. Lastly, the network is on the lookout for participants who are willing to become real advocates who will work for the advocacy/campaign. Each organization is allowed to send two representatives at most to participate in the training.

The two-day training will be held on November 29-30, 2011, Tuesday to Wednesday at the BEC Development Center, Bgy. Asisan, Tagaytay City, Cavite. The training is free including transportation from Manila-to-Tagaytay, Tagaytay-to-Manila. However, transportation expenses of participants coming from provinces are not included in the package. We hope the organization that decided to send-in regional participants can take-on that expense as their counterpart/initial commitment to the advocacy.

The training is a very useful tool for understanding further the issue of debt – basic debt situation how does it relate to important issues like poverty and environment, the culture of Filipinos on the debt, its faith-based perspectives and how the faith-based community can help as debt advocates.

Attached with this letter is the tentative program of the two-day training and the participant’s registration form.

Should you have further inquiries about the event, please contact Jofti Villena (09088945174).

[Video] The Edsa Stories: June Keithley – focusweb.org

http://focusweb.org/edsav2/category/women/


Uploaded in youtube by edsastories

In February 1986, after the military knocked down the transmitter of Radio Veritas, the Catholic broadcast station that played a key role in the powerful uprising that dismantled Ferdinand Marcos‘ dictatorship and restored democracy in the Philippines, the station transferred to a secret location. It was June Keithley , together with Angelo Castro, who continued broadcasting in what was now called Radyo Bandido. She became the voice of that powerful medium; she was the broadcaster who kept everyone’s spirits alive and gave the people valuable information that helped them mobilize into a successful movement that brought down Marcos and his government.

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